The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Digital Resources

Study: Economic Benefits of the Marcellus Shale

Expanding natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale would produce additional jobs, generate increased government revenue and provide stable, reliable supplies to help secure the nation’s energy future.

API Blogger Conference Call: Energy Issues Post Deepwater Horizon - 7.22.10

On July 22, 2010, API hosted a conference call with 11 bloggers to discuss pressing energy issues following the Deepwater Horizon incident, including the drilling moratorium, the potential economic impact of new taxes being considered by Congress, oil spill liability issues, and new ethanol standards proposed by the EPA.

Healthy Earnings Create Jobs and Drive Economic Growth

http://EnergyTomorrow.org American Petroleum Institute (API) Chief Economist Dr. John Felmy explains how healthy earnings from the oil and natural gas industry generate new jobs, revenue for federal and local governments, and help spur investments in new energy technologies. He also discusses the potential impacts of misguided policies currently being considered by Congress, pointing out that Congress should not repeat mistakes of the past. We should move beyond Washington rhetoric and focus on developing rational energy policies. To learn more, visit http://EnergyTomorrow.org.

The Harmful Effects of a Severance Tax on Pennsylvania's Energy Economy

http://EnergyTomorrow.org Timothy J. Considine, Ph.D. of Natural Resource Economics and author of a new study on natural gas production in the Marcellus Shale region, explains how a Pennsylvania severance tax could reduce capital inflows for developing natural gas production in the state. For more information, visit http://EnergyTomorrow.org.

How New York's Drilling Moratorium Could Impact the New York Economy

http://EnergyTomorrow.org Based on his recent study, Timothy J. Considine, Ph.D. of Natural Resource Economics, forecasts the continuation of New York's moratorium on Marcellus natural gas development will cost the state valuable economic opportunities and future development of the even more promising Utica Shale region. For more information, visit http://EnergyTomorrow.org.

The Economic Impacts of the Marcellus Shale

http://EnergyTomorrow.org Timothy J. Considine, Ph.D. of Natural Resource Economics, shares his new study on natural gas production in the Marcellus Shale region and explains how a high-development in this region would fuel energy security, job-creation and our economy over the next decade. For more information, visit http://EnergyTomorrow.org.

The Economic Impacts of the Marcellus Shale: Implications for New York, Pennsylvania &

According to the study, “The Economic Impacts of the Marcellus Shale: Implications for New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia,” by Timothy J. Considine, Ph.D. of Natural Resource Economics, natural gas production in the Marcellus Shale region—if developed—could create 280,000 new American jobs and add $6 billion in new tax revenues to local, state and federal governments over the next decade.

Hydraulic Fracturing: Unlocking America's Natural Gas Resources

Clean burning natural gas is critical to American manufacturing jobs, to farmers for fertilizer, to households for heating and cooking, to businesses for electricity and fuel for transportation needs, and to society to help address climate change concerns because of its low carbon-content. But getting to the natural gas isn’t always easy. That’s where hydraulic fracturing plays an important role in America’s energy supply. Hydraulic fracturing is a proven technology used safely for more than 60 years in more than a million wells. It uses water pressure to create fissures in deep underground shale formations that allow oil and natural gas to flow. In fact, hydraulic fracturing is so important that without it, we would lose 45 percent of domestic natural gas production and 17 percent of our oil production within five years.

Who Will Be Hurt By Higher Taxes on Energy Companies?

http://EnergyTomorrow.org American Petroleum Institute (API) Tax Policy Manager Stephen Comstock explains why it makes no sense for Congress to raise energy taxes. Raising energy taxes would hurt the 2.1 million people directly employed by the oil and natural gas industry as well as their local economies and communities. For more information, visit http://EnergyTomorrow.org.

Provisions Increasing Taxes on the Oil and Natural Gas Industry

Some in Congress want to increase federal revenue by repealing or modifying several long-standing, legitimate tax policies affecting the U.S. oil and natural gas industry. At a time of high unemployment when we are struggling to recover from a recession, these proposals will threaten U.S. jobs and weaken U.S.-based companies.