The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

oil-and-natural-gas-development  energy-future  emissions  economic-benefits  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 13, 2015

The language of issue activism can have drawbacks. Sound bites charged with political activism seldom set the stage for useful policy discussions.

The White House recently earned four “Pinocchios” from the Washington Post’s FactChecker for mirroring the anti-Keystone XL talk heard from those who want the U.S. to stop using oil.

Similarly, in a climate change speech at the Atlantic Council this week, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry mischaracterized America’s energy reality, calling U.S. oil and coal “outdated energy sources.” Said Kerry, “Coal and oil are only cheap ways to power a nation in the very near term.”

Not according to those who get paid to quantify U.S. energy, now and in the future. In its 2014 Annual Energy Outlook report, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) said that oil and natural gas supplied 63 percent of U.S. energy in 2012, with coal supplying another 18 percent. EIA projects that oil and natural gas will supply 61 percent of our energy in 2040, with coal holding steady at 18 percent.

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ohio  oil-and-natural-gas-development  shale-energy  utica-shale  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  fracking  safe-operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 12, 2015

Ohio is returning to the ranks of the country’s leading energy-producing states – thanks to the Utica Shale and safe hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. We say returning, because Ohio was one of the “cradle” states for U.S. oil production.

This “Back to the Future” aspect of Ohio energy is illustrated on the Energy From Shale website in a new photo gallery that features 19th-century photographs alongside contemporary shots for a fascinating then-and-now portrayal of the state’s oil and natural gas development.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  texas  colorado  shale-energy  new-york  liquefied-natural-gas  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 4, 2015

AEI Carpe Diem Blog: The Energy Information Administration (EIA) released new state crude oil production data last week for the month of December, and one of the highlights of that monthly report is that oil output in America’s No. 1 oil-producing state – Texas – continues its phenomenal, eye-popping rise. Here are some details of oil output in “Saudi Texas” for the month of December and the economic impact that production is having on the state and national economies:

For the ninth straight month starting in April 2014, oil drillers in Texas pumped out more than 3 million barrels of crude oil every day (bpd) during the month of December.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  access  president-obama  congress  energy-policy  economic-benefits  trade  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 26, 2015

The president’s Council of Economic Advisers (CEA) understands the significance of the U.S. energy revolution quite well – reflected in the energy chapter of its recent 2015 Economic Report of the President.

The chapter should be widely read by policymakers, from the president and Congress on down, because it notes the role of surging domestic oil and natural gas production in the ongoing energy revolution. From there it’s possible to identify needed policies for the future.

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energy  oil-and-natural-gas-development  access  keystone-xl-pipeline  jack-gerard  economic-benefits 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 14, 2015

Some time ago the Keystone XL pipeline debate stopped being a discussion of energy infrastructure and whether the privately financed project was in the national interest. Thank Keystone XL’s opponents, who detached the debate from fact and scientific analysis to better serve their purposes.

Keystone XL’s most ardent foes readily acknowledged as much. They said that for them the pipeline was a symbol to be used in pursuit of political power.  As one anti-pipeline activist put it: “The goal is as much about organizing young people around a thing. But you have to have a thing.”

Symbolism over substance, politics over the greater public good? Too often that’s the way it’s played Inside The Beltway. But at some point political power needs to give way to actual power, and public policy should be grounded in our energy reality, not symbolism. It should be fact-based and consider the impacts on the daily lives of real people, not narrow ideological agendas.

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offshore-energy  oil-and-natural-gas-development  outer-continental-shelf  atlantic-ocs  wind-energy  economic-benefits  tax-revenues  safe-operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 29, 2015

Offshore energy is getting lots of attention this week, which is good. Offshore energy is vital to America’s economy and energy security.

This week the Interior Department proposed the first draft of its next five-year program for offshore oil and natural gas leasing, in the 2017-2020 timeframe. While the draft plan doesn’t go far enough, it could include the first Atlantic lease sale in decades, and that would be a positive step. Meanwhile, on Thursday the federal government is scheduled to hold a lease sale for offshore wind in the Atlantic.

All of the above …

That’s more than a rhetorical flourish. America will need energy from all available sources in the future – thus the case for a genuine all-of-the-above strategy. We hope this week’s wind sale is successful.

Energy isn’t a zero-sum game, and neither is energy job creation. Offshore energy development of any kind can generate jobs and raise significant revenue for government. The country benefits and so do individual Americans – you know, folks holding the middle-class jobs everyone wants to support.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  safe-operations  leasing-plan  offshore-drilling  economic-benefits  atlantic-ocs  gulf-of-mexico  alaska  pacific-outer-continental-shelf-ocs  interior-department  boem  federal-leases 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 28, 2015

Three maps, two views of America’s offshore energy wealth.

One reflects vast offshore oil and natural gas resource potential – nearly 50 billion barrels of oil and more than 200 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. We say potential because these areas represent the 87 percent of America’s federal offshore acreage that has been closed to exploration and development, dwarfing the areas where development is allowed.    

Nonetheless, what’s visible is the profile of an offshore energy giant, an offshore superpower. This is energy muscle waiting to be flexed. These are resources that could benefit Americans in terms of energy security, as more oil and natural gas is safely and responsibly produced right here at home, as well as job creation and economic stimulus.

That’s what energy superpowers do. They develop their resources to increase their security in a world where secure energy is fundamental to overall security. They develop their resources to fuel economic growth and to help ensure the prosperity of their citizens.  

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energy-policies  keystone-xl-pipeline  president-obama  state-of-the-union  oil-and-natural-gas-development  state-of-american-energy  jack-gerard  economic-benefits  state-department  canadian-oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 21, 2015

In a State of the Union address that mostly skimmed over energy issues – remarkable, given the generational opportunities stemming from America’s ongoing energy revolution – President Obama still underscored the yawning disconnect between his all-of-the-above energy rhetoric and his administration’s failure to put that rhetoric into action.

Talking about the need for infrastructure investment, the president said:

“Democrats and Republicans used to agree on this. So let’s set our sights higher than a single oil pipeline. Let’s pass a bipartisan ... infrastructure plan that could create more than 30 times as many jobs per year and make this country stronger for decades to come. Let’s do it. Let’s get it done.”

We agree. America’s infrastructure needs are greater than a single oil pipeline – the political football known as the Keystone XL – which the president has been punting around for more than six years.

But there’s no good reason, no good excuse, for not making the Keystone XL pipeline Job No. 1 in a procession of infrastructure projects. President Obama hasn’t offered any beyond calling “temporary” the 42,100 jobs the U.S. State Department has said Keystone XL would support. Yet, those jobs are no more temporary than the ones that would be supported by building bridges, roads and other projects the president routinely cites.

That’s the disconnect between what President Obama peddles in speeches to Congress and around the country – and what his administration is doing.

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shale-energy  safe-operations  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  horizontal-drilling  oil-and-natural-gas-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 21, 2015

In a new API television ad, energy industry geologist Barbara Pickup calls the forest trails of Colorado her “streets” and the towering trees “my skyscrapers.” The Dillon, Colo., resident says she is for protecting the environment – but also for safe energy development, noting that hydraulic fracturing has been around for 65 years:

“Fracking will help secure America’s energy future, and I want to make sure we’re protecting the land and water, too. There has to be a balance.”

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  federal-lands  regulation  permitting  access  leasing  blm34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 15, 2015

Charting some of the latest Bureau of Land Management (BLM) data on federal oil and natural gas activity – which mostly shows continuing decline.

First, BLM issued fewer new oil and natural gas leases in fiscal year 2014 than in any year since FY1988. That year 9,234 new leases were issued, a number that fell to 1,157 in FY2014. Last year’s number was a retreat from FY2013, when 1,468 new leases were issued.

Other indicators also show declining oil and natural gas opportunity in areas controlled by the federal government.

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