The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

economy  energy-security  jobs  exports  keystone-xl-pipeline  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 24, 2014

Friends of U.S. Chamber of Commerce Blog: American free enterprise can achieve almost anything. But, only if we allow it to work properly (this requires a nimble regulatory environment and a streamlined permitting process). One stark example of this gone wrong is the increasingly evergreen example of the Keystone XL pipeline, a project that is projected to create 42,000 new jobs and generate 4 billion in economic activity. So far, we've waited 6 years for a response on the permit request.

Studies have been conducted. Talking heads and scientists have hashed out all the pros and cons. And despite broad affirmation and support, the American people are stuck waiting for Washington to act. Six years is a disgrace; bigger things can be done in far less time.

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american-energy  economy  energy-security  jobs  keystone-xl-pipeline  exports  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 21, 2014

Forbes (Robert Bradley Jr.): The environmentalist campaign to block the Keystone XL pipeline has run out of gas.

 

Canada’s largest energy firm, TransCanada, has announced plans to create an alternative to KXL that lies entirely within Canada’s borders – a pipeline that would transport crude from Alberta’s oil sands to our northern neighbor’s east coast.

 

Known as Energy East, the new project presents clear proof that, even without a U.S. pipeline, the Canadian oil sands will continue to be developed. By blocking KXL, the fourth and final leg of a 2,151-mile transnational project, green activists are simply denying Americans the project’s wide-ranging benefits. The U.S. State Department counts42,000 new jobs, plus the opening of a new way to get oil from Montana and North Dakota to Gulf Coast refineries.

 

If the Obama Administration doesn’t approve the 800,000 barrels/day, Alberta–U.S. Gulf Coast pipeline soon, an historic opportunity to improve the American economy and strengthen our country’s energy infrastructure will be squandered.

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crude-oil  energy-exports  keystone-xl-pipeline  crude-oil-prices  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  women-in-energy-industry 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 8, 2014

New York Times: HOUSTON — The Singapore-flagged tanker BW Zambesi set sail with little fanfare from the port of Galveston, Tex., on July 30, loaded with crude oil destined for South Korea. But though it left inauspiciously, the ship’s launch was another critical turning point in what has been a half-decade of tectonic change for the American oil industry.

The 400,000 barrels the tanker carried represented the first unrestricted export of American oil to a country outside of North America in nearly four decades. The Obama administration insisted there was no change in energy trade policy, perhaps concerned about the reaction from environmentalists and liberal members of Congress with midterm elections coming. But many energy experts viewed the launch as the curtain raiser for the United States’ inevitable emergence as a major world oil exporter, an improbable return to a status that helped make the country a great power in the first half of the 20th century.

“The export shipment symbolizes a new era in U.S. energy and U.S. energy relations with the rest of the world,” said Daniel Yergin, the energy historian. “Economically, it means that money that was flowing out of the United States into sovereign wealth funds and treasuries around the world will now stay in the U.S. and be invested in the U.S., creating jobs. It doesn’t change everything, but it certainly provides a new dimension to U.S. influence in the world.”

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american-energy  economy  jobs  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline  gas-prices 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted September 24, 2014

The Washington Post: The crude oil boom in the western United States has changed the way states do business. North Dakota is growing so rapidly that the legislature is considering returning to special session to make big investments in new infrastructure. Wyoming now receives more than half its tax dollars from oil and gas companies paying to extract fuel. And big parts of Colorado, California, Texas, Oklahoma and a handful of other states increasingly rely on the energy industry for jobs.

Domestic production peaked in 1986, at 283 million barrels per month, according to the Energy Information Administration. In September 2005, domestic production hit a nadir of just 126 million barrels a month. In the last decade, technological advances, including the increasing production from hydraulic fracturing, has reversed that 20-year decline in crude oil production.

Today, production is back up to 256 million barrels a month, according to the latest EIA figures.

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energy-security  energy-101  jobs  american-energy  keystone-xl-pipeline  oil-sands  economy  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted September 19, 2014

An unhappy birthday: Six years ago the Keystone XL pipeline application was first submitted. Now, after six years and five State Department reviews concluding that Keystone XL is in the national interest, Americans continue to wait for the jobs, revenue and security this project would provide. Meanwhile, since the application was filed in 2008, more than 10,000 miles of oil and natural gas pipeline have been built in the U.S – all while the Obama administration continues to delay a Keystone XL decision. And America loses.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  economic-growth  oil-sands  canada 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 16, 2014

This week the Keystone XL pipeline reaches a dubious anniversary – six years waiting for the Obama administration to approve a shovel-ready, privately financed infrastructure project that would create jobs while strengthening America’s energy, economic and national security.

It has been an unfortunate, unnecessary wait. Such projects historically are approved by Washington in one to two years. In the six years Keystone XL has been left on hold by this White House, 10,000 miles of oil and natural gas pipelines have been built in the United States.

While Keystone XL languishes, Canada – our neighbor, friend and largest supplier of imported oil – gets the cold shoulder from an administration that has dithered, delayed and dumbfounded its way into obstructing a vital piece of energy infrastructure – pleasing a small minority instead of advancing the national interest.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  shale-energy  keystone-xl-pipeline  energy-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted September 15, 2014

(Wall Street Journal): Skeptics of the U.S. energy boom say it can't last much longer because it requires drilling an ever-increasing number of wells.

But the boom already has lasted longer than anyone would have imagined just a decade ago and has more room to run. That's because oil and natural-gas wells have become more productive—an unrecognized but potent trend that should keep the fuels flowing.

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economy  jobs  american-energy  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline  pipelines 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted September 3, 2014

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: Two major pipeline projects are in the works to ship natural gas from the Marcellus and Utica shales to the southeastern U.S., a region with a growing appetite for natural gas.

Downtown-based EQT Corp. said Tuesday it is moving forward with its partner NextEra Energy, a Florida electric utility, to form a joint venture dubbed Mountain Valley Pipeline LLC. The partnership plans to build a 330-mile pipeline that would provide at least 2 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/​d) of transmission capacity to the mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic regions. The project, which is now seeking firm commitments for capacity from shippers during an open season, was first announced in June, and has already gotten commitments for 1.5 Bcf/​d, EQT said.

Meanwhile, a partnership of four energy companies — Dominion, Duke Energy, Piedmont Natural Gas and AGL Resources — also announced Tuesday a roughly $5 billion pipeline project to take about 1.5 Bcf/​d to North Carolina and Virginia. The Atlantic Coast Pipeline would span 550 miles from Harrison County, W.Va., through Virginia and then south to North Carolina.

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american-energy  economy  jobs  pennsylvania  exports  gulf-leases  gulf  refinery  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 21, 2014

Wall Street Journal: U.S. economic growth accelerated in the second half of 2013 before unexpectedly contracting early this year. But growth late last year was uneven across the nation, with some energy-rich states leading the pack while economies slowed in New England and on the Plains.

 

That’s according to new data released Wednesday by the Commerce Department. The agency already reported gross domestic product for the nation on a quarterly basis and at the state level annuallyNow, it has offered a quarterly breakdown for state-level GDP data through the end of 2013. The data are volatile from quarter to quarter, but allow a finer understanding of the ups and downs in regional economies.

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energy-security  jobs  economy  keystone-xl-pipeline  oil-sands  fracking  north-dakota 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 15, 2014

Forbes: The U.S. arm of the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) has been making news this week with a ‘new’ report claiming the Obama Administration drastically underestimated carbon emissions of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.  The report seeks to make the case as to why the final portion of the Keystone pipeline system should not be built.

As tantalizing as the report sounds, supporters of the pipeline have been quick to point out the report is actually a recycled 2013 SEI report which the State Department took into account, and largely dismissed.

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