The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

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Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 31, 2014

So long, 2014. From an energy standpoint, you’ll be missed. Let’s count the ways:

Surging domestic oil and natural gas production – largely thanks to safe hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling – is driving an American energy revolution that’s creating jobs here at home and greater security for the United States in the world.

It’s a revolution with macro-economic and geopolitical impacts, for sure. But it’s also a revolution that’s benefit virtually every American.

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energy-policy  oil-and-natural-gas-development  regulation  epa34  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  energy-exports  keystone-xl-pipeline  proved-reserves 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 30, 2014

UPI:  House Republicans will work to create the "architecture of abundance" needed to take advantage of North American energy leadership, a lawmaker said.

The House Energy and Commerce Committee published a 105-page strategy document meant to highlight the agenda of the incoming Republican-led Congress. It says federal policies are ill-suited to develop the infrastructure needed to take advantage of the oil and gas production boost in the United States.

"Creating this architecture of abundance is slowed at every step by archaic federal rules that can cause years of delays and even block some pipeline and power line projects outright," the paper reads.

Rep. Fred Upton, the committee's chairman, said the new Congress would work to advance its blueprint when it comes into power in January.

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renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  epa34  ethanol-in-gasoline  blend-wall  e8534  flexible-fuel-vehicles 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 12, 2014

Things got pretty bumpy for Janet McCabe, EPA's acting air chief, during her House subcommittee appearance this week, where she talked about the agency's failure to issue 2014 ethanol use requirements under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

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ozone-standards  epa34  economic-growth  air-quality 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 19, 2014

A couple of data points to remember with EPA poised to propose new, lower ground-level ozone standards, perhaps as soon as next month:

Air quality is and has been improving under the current, 75 parts per billion (ppb) standards, which are still being implemented across the country. Meanwhile, EPA reports national average ozone levels have fallen 33 percent since 1980 and 18 percent since 2000.

Against that backdrop, EPA staff reportedly is recommending a new primary ozone standard of between 60 and 70 ppb, which could put 94 percent of the country out of compliance – potentially stunting job creation and economic growth for little, if any, health benefit.

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renewable-fuel-standard  e1534  ethanol-in-gasoline  engine-safety  epa34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 17, 2014

Saw a tweet last week from Jalopnik, a website “obsessed with the cult of cars and everything that moves you,” and it reminded me of an important point in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) debate.

First, Jalopnik doesn’t actually do a car-of-the-year award because it considers them to be so much media hype. The tweet was a little jab at car awards. Still, Matt Hardigree, the site’s editor-in-chief, says the ’94 Miata really is a great, classic car.

Which leads to our point about the RFS: If you’re a lucky owner of a vintage Miata, don’t let E15 anywhere near its fuel tank.

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methane-emissions  emission-reductions  natural-gas-production  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  epa34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 22, 2014

This from Judi Greenwald, the Energy Department’s deputy director for climate, environment and efficiency, talking about methane regulation during a panel discussion this week (as reported by Fuel Fix.com):

“We know enough to act. There are uncertainties about methane emissions — and part of the administration’s strategy is to improve our numbers — but we know enough to take some action, and this problem may be easier to solve than many characterize.”

While others talk about methane and problem solving, industry already is significantly lowering methane emissions – even as natural gas production soars, thanks to safe fracking.

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renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  ethanol-in-gasoline  epa34  blend-wall  refinieries  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 8, 2014

Others are picking up on how late EPA is in setting this year’s ethanol use requirements – as well as how political calculations appear to be affecting the administration’s management of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). Politico (subscription required) has this:

The Obama administration is nearly a year late in setting its 2014 biofuels mandate, but both ethanol supporters and critics say with politics at play, the White House may delay its decision until after the midterm elections.

Politico adds:

Several sources following the issue closely say that the White House hoped that boosting the overall volumes would be enough to act as a boon to (Democrat Bruce Braley in Iowa’s U.S. Senate race). But renewable fuels advocates in the state aren’t happy with that compromise, so anything short of a clear victory for ethanol makers could hurt Braley’s campaign. … “If they increase the number, but it’s still tied to the (ethanol) blend wall, in our view, they will have killed the program, and that will be seen as a huge loss for Braley, and they’ll wait until after the election,” said one person in the biofuels industry. “If it’s good for Braley, it’ll be before the election. If it’s bad for Braley, it’ll be a punt. And people will see the punt.”

Indeed they will. They can’t help but see energy policy being contorted to serve political ends. It’s no way to conduct energy policy, and it’s no way to treat Americans who ultimately could be impacted by decisions (or the lack thereof) under the RFS.

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methane-emissions  greenhouse-gases  regulation  epa34  oil-and-natural-gas-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 7, 2014

New York Times columnist Joe Nocera has a new piece that calls for federal regulation of methane emissions from oil and natural gas production and distribution. Reducing methane emissions is a good idea – and industry has been doing it for years – which makes talk of new regulatory regimes seem odd.

Voluntarily, industry efforts have reduced methane emissions from fracked natural gas wells 73 percent since 2011, according to recent EPA data. That’s actually a fantastic number – one that parallels EPA’s greenhouse gases inventory showing a nearly 40 percent decrease in overall methane emissions from 2006 to 2012 – while natural gas production grew 37 percent.

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renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  ethanol-in-gasoline  blend-wall  epa34  cellulosic-biofuels  refinieries  e8534 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 2, 2014

Update: EPA waves white flag on 2014 RFS requirements.

The absurdity surrounding the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) continues:

Those Late 2014 Ethanol Requirements – EPA now is 10 months late with setting this year’s requirements for ethanol use. Under the RFS, the agency is required to tell obligated parties, like refiners, how much ethanol they’re required to use in a calendar year by November of the previous year. Thus, requirements for 2014 ethanol use were due in November, 2013.

As it is we’re getting closer to the point where the absurd becomes the ridiculous, with the growing possibility EPA could end up setting 2014’s requirements in 2015. It would be like something from one of the late, great Johnny Carson’s “Carnac the Magnificent” sketches: “Oh Unfortunate Ones, here’s how much ethanol you should have used …”

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greenhouse-gas-emissions  methane-emissions  oil-and-natural-gas-development  epa34  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 30, 2014

Some talk – some take to the streets – pushing for reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. The oil and natural gas industry is actually doing it. New EPA data supports:

  • Methane emissions from oil and natural gas systems decreased 12 percent since 2011.
  • The largest reductions come from hydraulically fractured natural gas wells – down 73 percent since 2011.
  • Industry’s overall greenhouse gas emissions (CO2 equivalent) decreased 1 percent in 2013 compared to 2012.
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