The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

ethanol  renewable-fuel-standard  epa34  consumers  blend-wall 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 15, 2013

Before taking a look at EPA’s proposals for 2014 ethanol use announced Friday, first consider a number that must guide the discussion of how much ethanol America’s refiners should be required to blend into the U.S. fuel supply: 132.65 billion gallons. That’s what the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), projects for 2014 gasoline demand.

Do the simple math. Using the government projection, the U.S. supply of conventional E10 fuel (up to 10 percent ethanol), for which the vast majority of cars and trucks on the road today were designed, would require 13.265 billion gallons of ethanol. If the ethanol mandate in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) required more, then you’re running into the ethanol “blend wall” – that is, to satisfy the RFS, refiners would have to blend fuel with higher ethanol content than millions of vehicles are designed to use.

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renewable-fuel-standard  ethanol-blends  epa34  consumers 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 11, 2013

The cost of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) hurts American businesses and consumers as ethanol production drives up food prices, higher-ethanol blend fuels get less mileage than conventional gasoline and higher blends can damage to engines both large and small.

The Historic Vehicle Association (HVA) and others associated with classic cars are especially concerned with the impact on engines that weren’t designed for fuels containing ethanol – much less higher-ethanol blends – at a time when ethanol-free fuel is getting harder to find because the RFS-driven ethanol “blend wall” is forcing E0 gasoline out of the market, reducing choice for consumers. More on ethanol and the RFS from their perspective.

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renewable-fuel-standard  ethanol  consumers  epa34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 8, 2013

Grainchicken and turkey producers are just parts of America's food industry that are being impacted by the ethanol mandates in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). 

When corn to produce ethanol requires more growing space, there’s less room for other crops, driving those prices higher. Demand for corn to make ethanol is driving the cost of feed for livestock higher, making meat costlier. And when some kinds of meat rise in price, demand (and thus, price) increases for cheaper meat. The American Frozen Food Institute (AFFI) and the American Meat Institute (AMI) add their voices to the other food industry perspectives on the RFS that we've highlighted in recent weeks.

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renewable-fuel-standard  ethanol  consumers  blend-wall 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 7, 2013

Check out a new video that quickly and efficiently captures the compelling reasons the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) should be repealed. 

When the RFS was created in 2007, the U.S. was in a much different place energy-wise, looking at a future dominated by energy scarcity. But with the shale energy revolution that has unfolded in the past few years, driven by innovative technologies that have resulted in advances in hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, the U.S. is producing oil at levels not seen in nearly a quarter century.

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e15-gas-blend  engine-safety  epa34  ethanol-lobby  consumers 

Bob Greco

Bob Greco
Posted November 6, 2013

They’re at it again. The ethanol lobby’s biggest voice, the Renewable Fuels Association (RFA), issued a press release last week trying to defend E15, the controversial fuel blend containing up to 15 percent ethanol. Only in this case, RFA was defending against an imaginary argument.

RFA claims the development of new vehicle models that can withstand E15 – which research has shown could damage enginesand fuel systems in models that weren’t designed to use it – “shines a bright light on Big Oil’s long-sustained, detrimental resistance to infrastructure build out.”

It’s an imaginary argument because no one opposed the increasing availability of E15-compatible cars. The problem with E15 is the 95 percent of the vehicle fleet that isn’t built to handle E15 and the retroactive nature of the E15 partial waiver.

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e1534  e8534  renewable-fuel-standard  consumers  epa34  aaa34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 1, 2013

It’s understandable that supporters of the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) might be anxious these days. Consider that EPA reportedly is thinking about lowering its 2014 ethanol mandates under the RFS, and that more than 160 members of the U.S. House of Representatives are urging the same in a letter to EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy.

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e1534  ethanol-blends  renewable-fuel-standard  consumers 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 31, 2013

The Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI), an international trade association representing more than 84 small engine, utility vehicle and outdoor power equipment manufacturers and suppliers worldwide, is closely watching public discussion of the Renewable Fuel Standard’s ethanol mandates and the push for wider use of E15 fuel. That’s because the small engines its members build and supply aren’t designed for higher ethanol blends. A look at E15 from OPEI and others in the small-engine sector.

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ethanol-blends  epa34  renewable-fuel-standard  consumers 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 28, 2013

The American Motorcyclist Association (AMA) talked last week about a recent survey from Harris Interactive that showed: “… more than three-fourths of Americans fear that E15 fuel may damage car engines and fuel system components, the American Motorcyclist Association reports. Also, more than two-thirds of those surveyed believe that using more corn for ethanol production could force up food prices …”

Here is more on E15, from the AMA.

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consumers  e1534  epa34  ethanol-blends  rfs34 

Bob Greco

Bob Greco
Posted January 30, 2013

Earlier this week API highlighted new research by the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) on serious potential problems with vehicle fuel systems when operated on E15 fuel – gasoline containing 15 percent ethanol.

In addition to CRC’s research, we want to call attention to a recent paper from Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) that was published by the Society for Automotive Engineers (SAE).  This study examined the effects of E15 on malfunction indicator lights (MIL), also known as “check engine lights.”

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consumers  e1534  epa34  ethanol  renewable-fuel-standard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 29, 2013

There’s new research showing E15 (15 percent ethanol) fuel could damage vehicles, potentially stranding motorists and/or saddling them with expensive repair bills – one of a number of reasons the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) should be scrapped. Following on a report last spring that said E15 could damage engines and cars and trucks, the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) has a new study that found E15 can mess up fuel pump systems and fuel measurement systems, potentially affecting “millions and millions” of vehicles, Bob Greco, API downstream and industry operations director, said in a conference call with reporters.

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