The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  colorado  safe-operations  oil-and-natural-gas-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 19, 2015

More from petroleum geologist Barbara Pickup in Breckenridge, Colo., featured in an API television ad earlier this year, talking about hydraulic fracturing and the environment.   

In the video below, Pickup talks about her love for the outdoors and environmental roots – and how they’re compatible with safe, responsible energy development using advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling.

Read More

fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  regulation  fracfocus 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 18, 2015

A number of congressional Democrats say they plan to reintroduce legislation to repeal the oil and natural gas industry’s “exemption” from the federal Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) and require disclosure of chemicals using in hydraulic fracturing.

This “Back to the Future” exercise – it first emerged in 2009 – is founded on two falsehoods: that industry is exempt from SDWA and that currently there’s no disclosure of chemicals used in fracking.

In short, the so-called “FRAC Act” that some in Congress hope to reanimate is one of those Washington solutions in search of a problem.

Read More

energy-exports  job-creation  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  north-carolina  infrastructure  ozone 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 17, 2015

Reuters: Lifting a 40-year-old U.S. ban on crude exports would create a wide range of jobs in the oil drilling supply chain and broader economy even in states that produce little or no oil, according to a report released on Tuesday.

Some 394,000 to 859,000 U.S. jobs could be created annually from 2016 to 2030 by lifting the ban, according to the IHS report, titled: "Unleashing the Supply Chain: Assessing the Economic Impact of a U.S. crude oil free trade policy."

Only 10 percent of the jobs would be created in actual oil production, while 30 percent would come from the supply chain, and 60 percent would come from the broader economy, the report said. The supply chain jobs would be created in industries that support drilling, such as oil field trucks, construction, information technology and rail.

Read More

ohio  oil-and-natural-gas-development  shale-energy  utica-shale  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  fracking  safe-operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 12, 2015

Ohio is returning to the ranks of the country’s leading energy-producing states – thanks to the Utica Shale and safe hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. We say returning, because Ohio was one of the “cradle” states for U.S. oil production.

This “Back to the Future” aspect of Ohio energy is illustrated on the Energy From Shale website in a new photo gallery that features 19th-century photographs alongside contemporary shots for a fascinating then-and-now portrayal of the state’s oil and natural gas development.

Read More

methane-emissions  natural-gas-production  hydraulic-fracturing  regulation  epa34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 10, 2015

Standout findings in a new major field study on methane emissions from natural gas collection and processing facilities across 13 states, led by Colorado State University include a couple of points:

First, of 130 facilities that collect natural gas from production wells, remove impurities and deliver it to inter- and intrastate pipeline networks,  101 had methane loss rates below 1 percent – including 85 of the 114 gathering facilities and all 16 of the processing plants studied. Put another way, methane containment at these facilities is more than 99 percent.

Second, the majority of emissions resulted from abnormalities involving broken or faulty equipment – issues that are relatively easy to address.

Read More

oil-imports  refineries  eia34  energy-exports  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  infrastructure  pipeline-construction 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 10, 2015

EIA Today in Energy: The increase in U.S. shale and tight crude oil production has resulted in a decrease of crude oil imports to the U.S. Gulf Coast area, particularly for light-sweet and light-sour crude oils. These trends are visualized in EIA's crude import tracking tool, which allows for time-series analysis of crude oil imported to the United States.

Historically, Gulf Coast refineries have imported as much as 1.3 million barrels per day (bbl/d) of light-sweet crude oil, more than any other region of the country. Beginning in 2010, improvements to the crude distribution system and sustained increases in production in the region (in the Permian and Eagle Ford basins) have significantly reduced light crude imports. Since September 2012, imports of light-sweet crude oil to the Gulf Coast have regularly been less than 200,000 bbl/d. Similarly, Gulf Coast imports of light crude with higher sulfur content (described as light-sour) have declined and have been less than 200,000 bbl/d since July 2013.

Read More

crude-oil  exports  infrastructure  permit-delays  regulation  education  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  pipelines  new-york-natural-gas 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 22, 2015

The Bakken Magazine: “Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200.”

This is the dreaded phrase on the “Go to Jail Card” that you’ve likely drawn, or at least heard of, when playing the game of Monopoly. Drawing this card is an all-around bummer. You lose a chance at scooping up valuable property before others do, you don’t get to collect $200 that you might need to purchase property, and it increases the chance that you lose the game. But at least it’s just a game. Right?

Wrong. What many people probably don’t realize is that we’re in a real-life game similar to Monopoly, but this one is focused on the global oil market, not property. And, it just so happens that we’re stuck holding the “Do not pass Go” card.

Read More

shale-energy  safe-operations  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  fracking  safety-standards  economic-benefits  pennsylvania 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 22, 2015

Small business owner Laura Ross in Washington, Pa., has a stake in safe energy development and environmental stewardship.

In the new television ad below, Ross talks about how her café and other businesses in town have seen an economic boost because of nearby energy development. But she’s also mindful of the environment, because her business carries items produced by local farms. The fact that hydraulic fracturing has been done safely for more than 65 years is reassuring to her and her patrons.

Read More

shale-energy  safe-operations  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  horizontal-drilling  oil-and-natural-gas-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 21, 2015

In a new API television ad, energy industry geologist Barbara Pickup calls the forest trails of Colorado her “streets” and the towering trees “my skyscrapers.” The Dillon, Colo., resident says she is for protecting the environment – but also for safe energy development, noting that hydraulic fracturing has been around for 65 years:

“Fracking will help secure America’s energy future, and I want to make sure we’re protecting the land and water, too. There has to be a balance.”

Read More

oil-and-natural-gas-production  job-creation  economic-growth  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  shale-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 20, 2015

API’s new national television ad underscores the ramifications of the United States as the world’s No. 1 producer of natural gas and its likely ascendance this year to No. 1 status in oil production. America is the world’s newest energy superpower.

As the ad notes, the domestic energy revolution that has elevated the U.S. the energy superpower status is because of safe, advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, which have unlocked vast oil and natural gas reserves held in shale and other tight-rock formations.

Read More