The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

exports  jobs  ohio  maryland  texas  north-dakota 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 29, 2014

NEW YORK (AP) — Whether to allow more exports of U.S. oil and natural gas has become a matter of political debate in Washington. But to economists, the answer is clear: The nation would benefit.

The vast majority of economists surveyed this month by The Associated Press say lifting restrictions on exports of oil and natural gas would help the economy even if it meant higher fuel prices for consumers.

More exports would encourage investment in oil and gas production and transport, create jobs, make oil and gas supplies more stable and reduce the U.S. trade deficit, they say.

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environment  economy  jobs  energy-101  exports  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 22, 2014

Forbes: Today is Earth Day, the annual celebration of Mother Earth and all she provides to us. So I just wanted to spend a few moments and words here urging you all to take time out of your busy days to thank Mother Earth for the following:

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american-energy  energy-security  fracking  exports  lng34 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 9, 2014

Wall Street Journal: The global energy equation has changed dramatically in recent years, thanks in large part to the impact of the shale-gas revolution. To get a handle on how the expectations of huge gas exports may shape the geopolitical future, The Wall Street Journal's John Bussey talked to Daniel Yergin, author and Vice Chairman of IHS Inc. Edited excerpts of their conversation follow.

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american-energy  fracking  jobs  economy  energy-security  keystone-xl-pipeline  exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 8, 2014

San Antonio Express-News: The oil and gas boom brought about by new drilling technology is drawing people to shale plays like iron filings to magnets.New census data show a population surge as the oil boom draws workers and families to oil fields around the country. Some of the nation's fastest-growing communities include Midland and Odessa in the Permian Basin and three cities near North Dakota's Bakken Shale field: Williston, Dickinson and Minot. The rapid increase in drilling in the Eagle Ford Shale has spilled into San Antonio.

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crude-oil  exports  energy-exports  job-creation  economic-growth  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 31, 2014

new study by ICF International makes the case for lifting trade restrictions that prevent the export of U.S. crude oil – consumer savings, job creation, domestic production growth and more:

  • $5.8 billion in consumer savings a year, on average, between 2015 and 2035 due to falling costs of gasoline, heating oil and diesel fuel.
  • Up to 300,000 additional jobs created in 2020, both due to higher oil production and U.S. consumers having more money to spend on goods and services.
  • As much as a 500,000 barrels-per-day rise in domestic oil production in 2020.
  • A $22 billion decrease in the U.S. trade deficit in 2020.
  • Economic growth totaling as much as $38 billion in 2020, with an average GDP increase of up to $27 billion a year through 2035.
  • An additional $15 billion to $17 billion invested in domestic exploration, development and production between 2015 and 2020.
  • An increase of as much as $13.5 billion in federal, state and local government revenues in 2020.

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economy  energy-efficiency  jobs  fracking  energy-security  exports  lng34 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 21, 2014

To Americans used to thinking of energy in terms of the Middle East, the names of the world's top producers of natural gas might come as a surprise.

 

No. 1 is the United States. No. 2 is Russia. Together they stand as the giants of gas production. What separates them is that the U.S. consumes its gas, while Russia has become the world's largest exporter — a key reason why President Vladimir Putin felt confident that he could seize Crimea from Ukraine and get away with it. Russia supplies 30% of Europe's gas needs, making it hard for European leaders to muster the resolve to resist.

 

The good news is that the West can turn the tables on Putin, freeing Europe from its dependency and in the process making Russia pay dearly. That can't be done fast enough to neuter the current crisis, nor will it come cheaply. But if Putin believes his actions will drive Europe toward energy independence, he'll have to think twice. Deprived of its biggest market, Russia's fragile, energy-based economy would erode, along with its power and Putin's stratospheric popularity.

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american-energy  fracking  exports  lng34  texas  policy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 28, 2014

U.S. Will Meet Energy Needs by 2020, Citi Researcher Says

Forbes: By the end of this decade, the United States will produce all the energy it needs, the head of commodities research for Citigroup said in Chicago Thursday.

Edward L. Morse, managing director and global head of commodities for Citi, said the gas and oil boom will combine with improved efficiency to make the U.S. a net-zero importer of energy by 2020.

“I think that the chances are close to 100 percent that the U.S. will be supplying 100 percent of its energy requirements for power generation and transportation,” Morse told about 100 people at a Fairmont Hotel gathering sponsored by The Chicago Council on Global Affairs.

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trade  economy  jobs  education  manufacturing  exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 24, 2014

Energy Trade is a Key Part of Overall U.S. Trade Flows

EIA Energy Today: Energy trade has long been a key component of overall U.S. trade flows. Recent developments in U.S. energy production, notably the rapid growth of tight oil and shale gas output, are leading to significant changes in the nation's energy trade flows. Another important factor is consumption trends, which reflect both increased efficiency of vehicles and other energy-using equipment, and structural changes in the economy. This article, which focuses on current energy trade in the context of overall trade flows, will be followed by several others in the coming days that consider the evolution of trade flows in major energy fuel categories since 2002.

 

As shown in the figure above, overall U.S. trade includes both goods and services but is dominated by goods. In 2013, as in other recent years, the United States was a net importer of goods and a net exporter of services. Energy accounted for 15% of gross U.S. goods imports in 2013, while energy exports, which have grown significantly in recent years, accounted for 7% of overall U.S. goods exports. Focusing on the net U.S. trade position, shown by the black line in the chart above, net energy imports account for nearly half of the total U.S. trade deficit in goods and services.

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american-energy  energy-security  global-markets  exports  jobs  economy  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 7, 2014

The Shale Factor in U.S. National Security 

Reuters (Dobriansky, Richardson and Warner): The boom in domestic shale oil and gas production has increased U.S. prosperity and economic competitiveness. But the potential for this to enhance our national security remains largely unrealized.

The shale surge has boosted production by 50 percent for oil and 20 percent for gas over the last five years. Yet our political leaders are only just beginning to explore how it can help further national strategic interests.

We led a major study at the Center for a New American Security in the last year, bringing together a nonpartisan panel to examine national security implications of the unconventional energy boom. We decided that outdated idealization of “energy independence” is preventing the administration and Congress from focusing on current energy vulnerabilities and figuring out how Washington should secure our economic and security interests.

Though the United States now imports less oil than it has for more than a dozen years, we should not distance ourselves from international oil markets by pursuing full energy self-sufficiency. The best way to advance energy security is to remain engaged internationally with major energy players.

Read more: http://reut.rs/1iyeOys 

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american-energy  energy-markets  global-energy  exports  infrastructure  fracking  jobs  economy  keystone-xl 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 27, 2014

Free America’s Energy Future: Drop Washington’s Counterproductive Oil and Natural Gas Ban

Forbes (Doug Bandow): For years people have been told to expect a dismal energy future.  But because of rapid free market innovation, Americans now can look forward to a future of energy abundance.  The U.S. could even become a leading exporter—if Washington gets out of the way.

Successive presidents and Congresses imposed controls, approved subsidies, created bureaucracies, and issued proclamations.  The most common commitment was to achieve “energy independence.”  But President Ronald Reagan set the stage for today’s energy advances by unilaterally eliminating oil price controls and pushing Congress to drop natural gas price and use restrictions.

His successors, however, have regressed back to expensive social engineering.  George W. Bush declared war on the common light bulb.  Barack Obama poured billions into the coffers of well-connected alternative energy firms, several of which, such as Solyndra, have gone bankrupt.  And everyone continued to support the authoritarian Gulf kleptocracies, led by Saudi Arabia, to ensure access to imported oil.

Yet an energy revolution is underway.  Observed Mark P. Mills, an Adjunct Fellow at the Manhattan Institute, “The game-changing technologies that have emerged involve hydrocarbons:  natural gas, oil, and coal.”  Major advances have been made in locating and extracting resources—such as horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or fracking—and operating in more distant and hostile environments.


Read morehttp://onforb.es/1f7kRXN

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