The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

keystone-xl  energy 

Sabrina Fang

Sabrina Fang
Posted March 5, 2013

More from around the web on the new State Department draft analysis of the Keystone XL oil pipeline, which, again, proved the economic benefits and lack of negative environmental impacts from the pipeline?  First to the Washington Post:

In its 2,000 pages, the report dismantled the case that nixing the Canadian pipeline must be a priority for anyone concerned about climate change, explaining anew that accepting or rejecting the project won’t make much difference to global emissions, U.S. oil consumption or world oil markets.

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energy  oerb  storage-tanks 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 5, 2013

Safety at unmanned oil well sites is important to the oil and natural gas industry.  A key issue is safety at oil field storage tanks. Typically these are located in rural or remote locations – though oil and natural gas development is moving into more urban, more populated areas as well.  People who aren’t authorized to be on these sites should stay away from such facilities.

Standards developed by API and industry companies are designed to reduce the risk of accident, and improving them is an ongoing effort.  Standards that take safety into account are being studied as are efforts to expand education and outreach efforts. Existing standards address tank installations and maintenance and promote safe working conditions and operations.

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natural-gas  energy  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 1, 2013

We say opportunities for oil and natural gas development in federally controlled areas – onshore and offshore – have been limited. Some are saying that’s false. Let’s look at the facts.

Claim: 70 percent of undiscovered oil and natural gas on federal lands is available for leasing and development.

Fact: 83 percent of areas controlled by the federal government are closed to oil and natural gas development.

What we have here is some sleight of hand with terminology. We’ll use the offshore situation to illustrate. During last year’s State of the Union address the president said he was directing the administration to open up more than 75 percent of America’s offshore resources for development.

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natural-gas  keystone-xl  energy  access  oil34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 28, 2013

Main points from White House energy advisor Heather Zichal in an update of the administration’s positions on energy and environmental policy at an event this week hosted by the Center for Strategic & International Studies:

  • Safe, reliable, affordable energy is the lifeblood of America’s economy and is fundamentally linked to U.S. security in the world.
  • America’s energy narrative has been rewritten – chiefly due to innovations that have launched the shale oil and natural gas revolution – from one of scarcity to one of abundance.
  • The administration’s chief economic goal is to create more middle-class jobs, and energy is and can continue to be a key driver of job and economic growth.

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taxes  revenues  energy  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 26, 2013

The White House is continuing the drum beat for higher taxes on oil and natural gas companies – oddly, as a reaction to higher gasoline prices. Press Secretary Jay Carney this week:

“Anybody fill up their gas tank this weekend?  Think the oil and gas companies can maybe afford to give up their taxpayer – special interest break?  I think most Americans would say yes.”

Let’s think this through. Gasoline prices have been rising – mostly because of underlying increases in the cost of crude oil due to higher global demand for oil – and the White House press secretary’s response is to connect gasoline prices with a tired proposal to raise taxes on the producers of gasoline.

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energy  community 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 26, 2013

Energy From Shale has a new television ad that looks at Searcy, Ark., and the important and robust discussions that occur between residents and energy developers in energy-producing communities. Dialogue is an important part of the energy-developing process: Today’s oil and natural gas companies are investing time and energy to listening and responding to community voices.

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supply  prices  gasoline  energy  demand  crude-oil  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 22, 2013

Gasoline prices have been climbing. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports:

The average U.S. retail price for regular motor gasoline has risen 45 cents per gallon since the start of the year, reaching $3.75 per gallon on February 18. Between January 1 and February 19, the price of Brent crude, the waterborne light sweet crude grade that drives the wholesale price of gasoline sold in most U.S. regions, rose about $6 per barrel, or about 15 cents per gallon.

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taxes  investments  energy  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 21, 2013

While the White House talks again about raising taxes on oil and natural gas companies, let’s look at a chart that captures the starkly different outcomes – in terms of revenue for government – from two policy paths: higher energy taxes vs. increased energy development:

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natural-gas  energy  atlantic-ocs  oil34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 20, 2013

The map below makes clear that while there’s talk in Washington of an all-of-the-above approach to energy, there’s much to be done in applying that concept to our outer continental shelf (OCS) oil and natural gas reserves. Other claims notwithstanding, the number to focus on is 87 – as in the 87 percent of federal offshore acreage that’s off limits to oil and natural gas development, indicated in red.

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regulation  natural-gas  energy  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 15, 2013

Of the energy-related lines in the president’s State of the Union address earlier this week, none stood out more than this one:

“… the natural gas boom has led to cleaner power and greater energy independence. That's why my administration will keep cutting red tape and speeding up new oil and gas permits.”

Certainly, the president is right, that the development of natural gas – especially from shale, developed with hydraulic fracturing – and oil are a big part of shrinking imports and cleaner air.

First the environment. We’ll keep saying it: Increased use of natural gas is a major factor in the reduction of U.S. carbon emissions to 1992 levels, which is allowing the U.S. to lead the world in emissions reduction, according to the International Energy Agency – all while producing more than ever before.

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