The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

canada  oil-sands  job-growth  economic-benefits  exports  oil-and-natural-gas  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 11, 2014

America’s trading relationship with Canada is key to U.S. energy security but also to the U.S. economy, as discussed in this recent post.

Some numbers from the International Trade Administration (ITA) help make a couple of finer points. First, while the United States imports more crude oil from Canada than any other country, our goods exports to Canada supported nearly 1.3 million jobs here in 2013 – and that number is on the rise. Second, U.S. oil and natural gas sector goods exports account for more than half of the growth in overall jobs supported by goods exports to Canada from 2010 to 2013 – and that number also is increasing.

Read More

oil-and-natural-gas-industry-earnings  economic-benefits  stock-ownership  pension-funds  mutual-funds  iras  401k  retirement-funds  investments 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 21, 2014

Sonecon’s updated look at ownership of the U.S. oil and natural gas industry shows that the benefits of a successful, rigorous industry sector continue to accrue to a broad range of Americans – who are the industry’s true owners. Here’s what we mean by broad:

  • Public and private pension and retirements plans, including 401(k)s and IRAs, hold 46.8 percent of all shares of U.S. oil and natural gas companies in 2014.
  • Asset management companies, including mutual funds, hold 24.7 percent of oil and natural gas shares.
  • Individual investors hold 18.7 percent of all oil and natural gas company shares.

Combined, that’s 97 percent of all oil and natural gas company stock – held by millions of Americans across the country.

Read More

oil-and-natural-gas-development  us-crude-oil-production  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  shale-energy  economic-benefits  job-creation  global-markets 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 16, 2014

Early in a panel discussion of energy policy and politics hosted by Real Clear Politics, the question was asked whether U.S. voters pay much attention to energy issues in an election year. RCP tweeted panelist/Wall Street Journal energy reporter Amy Harder’s response - that voters only notice energy when the prices are high.

Certainly, that’s generally been an accurate analysis. Less than a decade ago energy issues were challenging for U.S. policymakers staring at flat or declining domestic oil and natural gas production

But the U.S. energy picture has been dramatically altered by surging production here at home – an energy revolution made possible by advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling and vast resources in shale and other tight-rock formations. Result: Good news in the absence of challenging energy developments – for U.S. consumers (if not for hosts of events on the intersection of energy and politics).

Read More

crude-oil  energy-exports  economic-benefits  gasoline-prices  job-creation  manufacturing  investments  refineries 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 14, 2014

A new study by the Aspen Institute joins a series of analyses concluding that one benefit from exporting U.S. crude oil would be lower gasoline prices here at home. Aspen’s projected reduction of between 3 and 9 cents per gallon parallels findings in previous major studies by ICF International (3.8 cents per gallon), IHS (8 cents) and Brookings/NERA (7 to 12 cents) that exports would lower pump prices.

Aspen and the other studies project other benefits from exporting crude oil, including broad job creation, economic growth and increased domestic energy production. Yet the solidifying consensus that consumers also would benefit is critically important as the public policy debate on oil exports continues.

Read More

colorado  oil-and-natural-gas-development  economic-benefits  government-revenues  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  fracking  safe-operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 10, 2014

A new University of Colorado study affirms the dynamic and critical role energy development is playing in the state – in terms of support for public schools, job creation and the economy.

Just looking at 2012, oil and natural gas activity generated more than $200 million for Colorado schools, supported nearly 94,000 jobs in the state and created more than $23 million in state economic activity, according to the report conducted by the university’s Leeds School of Business and commissioned by API.

Read More

oil-and-natural-gas  domestic-energy  economic-benefits  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  horizontal-drilling  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 10, 2014

The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has another report on oil imports that underscores the incredible sea change in America’s energy picture – due to increased domestic production of oil and natural gas. EIA says net imports of energy as a share of energy consumption fell their lowest level in 29 years for the first six months of 2014.

This is a snapshot of America’s energy revolution – the fundamental shift from energy scarcity to abundance that would have been unthinkable less than a decade ago. The shift is the result of surging oil and natural gas production using advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, harnessing oil and gas reserves in shale and other tight-rock formations. Safe, responsible energy development has made the United States the world’s No. 1 natural gas producer, and the U.S. could become the world’s top producer of crude oil related liquids before the year is out, the International Energy Agency reports (h/t Financial Times.com).

Read More

energy-exports  crude-oil  natural-gas-supplies  lng-exports  economic-benefits  production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 6, 2014

We’ve posted a number of times on the merits of U.S. energy exports, because whether the subject is exporting crude oil or natural gas, there are compelling economic and energy reasons to lift restrictions on America’s ability to be a major player in global markets. While those restrictions remain, America and Americans lose.

A number of studies have said that energy exports will benefit our economy and stimulate more domestic production – here, here and here on liquefied natural gas (LNG) and here and here on crude oil. A new report from Columbia University’s Center for Global Energy Policy added that LNG exports could help strengthen the United States’ foreign policy hand.

Thanks to abundant oil and natural gas reserves, advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling and investments by a robust industry sector, the U.S. is the world’s No. 1 producer of natural gas and is about to become No. 1 in oil output (subscription required). Yet, because of self-imposed and outdated (in the case of the crude oil) export restrictions, the U.S. isn’t harnessing its energy potential as it could and should.

Read More

lng-exports  liquefied-natural-gas  economic-benefits  production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 1, 2014

Earlier this month Oilprice.com’s Nick Cunningham wrote this piece explaining that the debate over exporting U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) has been won – citing the openness of the Obama administration and leading Democrats to exports. Cunningham writes:

In fact the Obama administration and Congressional Democrats have received little blowback for the LNG projects that have received approval. And with tacit or overt support from Democrats, the LNG issue has largely been won by export supporters.

Still, some export opponents try to gain traction despite the findings of a number of studies (NERA, ICF, Brookings) that project broad economic benefits to the United States from LNG exports, with minimal effect on domestic prices. Earlier this year NERA updated its 2012 study:

LNG exports provide net economic benefits in all the scenarios investigated, and the greater the level of exports, the greater the benefits. The market for LNG exports is self-limiting, in that little or no natural gas will be exported if the price of natural gas in the US increases much above current expectations. High levels of exports can be expected only if natural gas is plentiful and inexpensive enough to produce so that prices remain below current levels, even with high levels of exports. (Emphasis added)

The issue of domestic prices is important because export opponents have been using an apples-to-oranges argument trying to scare up unfounded concern about the domestic effects of exports, citing conditions in Australia’s natural gas market.

Read More

crude-oil  exports  trade  oil-production  economic-benefits 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 10, 2014

A new report from Brookings’ Energy Security Initiative adds more scholarly weight to the analytical case for lifting America’s decades-old ban on crude oil exports. Echoing earlier studies by IHS and ICF International, the Brookings research finds that allowing the export of domestic crude would stimulate more oil production here at home, provide broad economic benefits and strengthen U.S. energy security. Brookings:

… we believe that the U.S. should allow the market to determine where crude oil will go and move immediately to lift the ban on all crude oil exports. … After 40 years of perceived oil scarcity, the United States is in a position to help maximize its own energy and economic security by applying the same principles to free trade in energy that it applies to other goods. By lifting the ban on crude oil exports, the United States also will help mitigate oil price volatility while alleviating the negative impacts of future global oil supply disruptions.

Read More

oil-and-natural-gas-jobs  economic-benefits  oil-and-natural-gas-development  energy-development  hydraulic-fracturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 9, 2014

One way to measure the positive impact of America’s oil and natural gas industry is the 9.8 million jobs it supports nationally, accounting for 5.6 percent of total U.S. employment. Another way to look at our industry’s economic breadth is the size and diversity of supporting businesses, reaching into every state in the union and the District of Columbia.

That’s what you see in a new vendor supply survey unveiled this week, listing 30,000 operators, contractors, service companies, suppliers and other vendors that support oil and natural gas operations. Even if there isn’t an oil or natural gas well site near where you live, chances are good a business that supports the oil and natural gas industry is.

Read More