The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

energy-exports  crude-oil  liquefied-natural-gas  lng34  economic-growth  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 8, 2014

The U.S. Commerce Department’s newest trade report released this week shows increased exports of crude oil and petroleum products were a major factor in shrinking the trade deficit in June to $41.5 billion, down from $44.7 billion in May.

That’s great news. Energy exports are helping build America’s economic strength globally while creating jobs and opportunity here at home. America is more secure as a result of our energy revolution that is bringing opportunities to engage world energy markets and harness U.S. energy for good. Allowing more U.S. oil and natural gas exports is the logical course to support and expand America’s global presence.

Read More

crude-oil  exports  trade  bakken-shale  fracking  emissions  oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 30, 2014

Washington Post Editorial: Quietly but wisely, the Commerce Department has decided to allow the first exports of U.S. crude oil since Congress imposed a ban on such sales (except to Canada) in the 1970s. To be sure, the agency’s ruling amounts to redefining crude in a way that applies only to a form of ultralight oil that U.S. refineries are ill-equipped to process. The executive branch couldn’t do much more than that to expand crude exports without congressional permission. Still, Commerce’s move is a step in the right direction because resuming oil sales abroad could help the U.S. economy reap the full fruits of the shale revolution that has propelled this country back into the top ranks of global oil and gas production.

The origins of the ban lie in the long-gone political and economic issues of the Nixon era. Specifically, the United States banned oil exports in response to the declining domestic production and Middle East supply shocks of that time, which, together with the then-existing system of U.S. price controls, made it seem rational to keep U.S.-produced oil at home rather than let it flow to the highest bidder on the world market. The world has changed dramatically since then; with U.S. production booming, this country is in a position to move the world market. Yet some still defend the export ban on the grounds that it holds down the price of crude to U.S. refineries and, by extension, the price of gasoline at U.S. pumps.

new report by IHS Global explains why that thinking is outmoded. 

Read More

oil-production  crude-oil  lng-exports  keystone-xl-pipeline  fracking  offshore-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 16, 2014

FT.com – Despite jitters over Iraq, the price of oil is at its most stable since the early 1970s, as a huge increase in US oil production offsets massive disruptions to supply from places such as Libya, according to BP.

Christof Rühl, group chief economist, said the world had seen a cumulative 3m barrels a day of supply disruption since the start of the 2011 Arab uprising but that had been “cancelled out” by a similar extra amount of US production.

“There has been an almost perfect match between outages in north Africa and elsewhere and US production growth,” he said. The equilibrium had created an “eerie quiet” in global oil markets.

Read More

economy  energy-security  environment  jobs  fracking  alaska  crude-oil 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 6, 2014

UPI: WASHINGTON --Strong growth in onshore U.S. oil and gas production means fewer problems from hurricanes, the analytical arm of the U.S. Energy Department said Wednesday.

Sunday marked the start of the Atlantic hurricane season. As of Wednesday, there are no cyclones reported in the Atlantic Ocean, though Tropical Storm Boris is headed north from the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico at a rate of 5 miles per hour.

Though offshore oil and gas installations may be shut in by any major storm in the Atlantic, EIA said inland production could make up for any shortfall.

Read More

crude-oil  energy-exports  economic-benefits  production  global-markets 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 29, 2014

Individual states would see significant job creation and economic growth from exporting U.S. crude oil, according to anew state-by-state report by ICF International and EnSys Energy. Specifically, 18 states could realize more than 5,000 new jobs each in 2020 from crude oil exports, with state economies growing by hundreds of millions of dollars each.

Kyle Isakower, API vice president for regulatory and economic policy, talked about the study during a conference call with reporters:

“There is a growing realization that this is a new era for American energy. Scarcity is giving way to abundance, and restrictions on exports only limit our potential as a global energy superpower. Additional exports could prompt higher production, generate savings for consumers, and bring more jobs to America. The economic benefits are well-established, and policymakers are right to reexamine 1970s-era trade restrictions that no longer make sense.”

Read More

crude-oil  lng-exports  energy-department  economic-growth  manufacturing  fracking 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 14, 2014

Wall Street Journal (subscription publication): Top Obama administration officials are considering relaxing federal laws banning crude-oil exports, a move that would upend decades-old policy, cause a political stir in Washington and sway the global oil market.

U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz said Tuesday that some of the fast-growing supply of domestically produced oil isn't suitable for refining locally, which could warrant re-examining a nearly 40-year-old law that bans exports of most crude.

"The nature of the oil we're producing may not be well-matched to our current refinery capacity," Mr. Moniz said Tuesday after an energy conference in Seoul. The administration is studying the issue, though government officials declined to comment on its scope or timing.

Read More

crude-oil  energy-information-administration  oil-and-natural-gas-access  shale-energy  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 11, 2014

Earlier this week the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) blew back a lot of folks’ hair with the high oil-production scenario in its 2014 Annual Energy Outlook – projecting for the first time ever that the net import share of U.S. petroleum and other liquids could reach zero. By 2037. That’s amazing considering that less than a decade ago the import share was nearly 60 percent.

Next from EIA: New data on growing U.S. crude oil and lease condensate reserves – more evidence of the ongoing U.S. energy revolution.

Read More

energy-exports  lng-exports  crude-oil  economic-growth  keystone-xl  oil-sands  fracking 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 4, 2014

Opponents of Natural Gas Exports Have It All Wrong

WSJ MarketWatch (Furchtgott-Roth): Americans opposed to the export of U.S. natural gas give many reasons for their position. But almost all of them are wrong.

The problem is that people underestimate the amount of this country’s natural gas and the potential effect exports could have on the world market.

Russia has swallowed parts of Georgia and Ukraine. No one is proposing that America send soldiers to defend those countries, even though we guaranteed Ukraine’s sovereignty in 1994 under the Budapest Memorandum. Instead, we can help our allies by diminishing Russia’s economic power over them. And that power rests on oil and gas.

Read More

crude-oil  exports  energy-exports  job-creation  economic-growth  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 31, 2014

new study by ICF International makes the case for lifting trade restrictions that prevent the export of U.S. crude oil – consumer savings, job creation, domestic production growth and more:

  • $5.8 billion in consumer savings a year, on average, between 2015 and 2035 due to falling costs of gasoline, heating oil and diesel fuel.
  • Up to 300,000 additional jobs created in 2020, both due to higher oil production and U.S. consumers having more money to spend on goods and services.
  • As much as a 500,000 barrels-per-day rise in domestic oil production in 2020.
  • A $22 billion decrease in the U.S. trade deficit in 2020.
  • Economic growth totaling as much as $38 billion in 2020, with an average GDP increase of up to $27 billion a year through 2035.
  • An additional $15 billion to $17 billion invested in domestic exploration, development and production between 2015 and 2020.
  • An increase of as much as $13.5 billion in federal, state and local government revenues in 2020.

Read More

crude-oil  exports  economic-growth  job-creation  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 23, 2014

The U.S. energy revolution continues to reshape America’s energy outlook for the better. Thanks largely to shale energy reserves and advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s 2014 Annual Energy Outlook estimates domestic oil production will approach 9.6 million barrels per day by 2016 – a level of output not seen since 1970. EIA also projects that U.S. liquid fuels net imports as a share of consumption will decline to about 25 percent in 2016, down from a high of 60 percent in 2005. Both are great pieces of news.

Read More