The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

vote4energy  public-health  air-quality  emission-reductions  natural-gas  infrastructure 

Kate Wallace

Kate Wallace
Posted August 23, 2016

The National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) released a new paper discussing the role of natural gas in public health throughout Turkey. The study focused on the relationship between the adoption of natural gas services and the mortality rates of adults and the elderly. Furthermore, the NBER released a study in February that focused on the relationship between the use of natural gas and infant mortality rates in Turkey.

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vote4energy  arkansas  natural-gas  renewable-fuel-standard  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 23, 2016

Among the country’s top 15 states in overall energy production, Arkansas had a more than 400 percent increase in natural gas output from 2005 through 2015 – thanks to safe hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling in shale and other tight-rock formations. By itself Arkansas accounted for 3.5 percent of U.S. gas production. In a real sense, the state is a snapshot of the U.S. energy renaissance, launched by fracking.

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indiana  vote4energy  natural-gas  refineries  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 22, 2016

Indiana’s significant industrial sector, which manufactures steel, aluminum, chemicals and more, used more energy (1,327 trillion Btu) than the state’s residential and commercial sectors combined (972.8 trillion Btu) in 2014. The sector is the state’s largest natural gas user, consuming more gas than all other sectors combined, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

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oregon  vote4energy  natural-gas  lng-exports  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 20, 2016

Even in a big hydroelectric power-producing state like Oregon, petroleum-based fuels play an important energy role. Hydro accounted for 55.5 percent of the state’s net electricity generation in 2015 and supplied 34 percent of the energy Oregonians used in 2014 – the largest single energy source. Yet, combined fuels from oil and natural gas supplied 54.5 percent of the energy the state used. By itself, natural gas supplied 23 percent of the energy the state consumed.

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rhode-island  vote4energy  natural-gas  infrastructure  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 19, 2016

Without any oil or natural gas of its own, Rhode Island ranks 49th among the 50 states in energy production. Thus, virtually all of the energy Rhode Island uses must come from somewhere else. In 2015, 95.2 percent of Rhode Island’s net generation of electricity was fueled by natural gas, which makes sufficient infrastructure – pipelines and gas-fired power plants – an imperative. 

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natural-gas  climate  offshore-energy  virginia  access  emission-reductions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 17, 2016

Politicians’ issue positions are scribbled in sand, not granite, right? But here’s one that shouldn’t shift one bit – whether you’re a Democrat, Republican, an Independent or whatever: support for domestic natural gas and the hydraulic fracturing that’s producing record volumes of it. Thanks to fracked natural gas the United States leads the world in reducing carbon emissions, we're more energy secure and consumers are benefiting. No issue is more bipartisan than American-made energy – the natural gas and oil that primarily fuel our economy and our modern lifestyles, brought to us all by safe, responsible fracking.

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georgia  vote4energy  natural-gas  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 17, 2016

Georgia is another good example of an all-of-the-above energy state. As an energy producer, Georgia has more nuclear electric power than any other energy source. At the same time, natural gas is the state’s leading fuel for generating electricity, accounting for 40.2 percent of its net generation in 2015. As a heavily forested state, Georgia produces large volumes of feedstock for biomass electricity generation, ranking third in net electricity from biomass in 2014. It truly takes an all-of-the-above energy approach – including oil and natural gas, nuclear, renewables – to energize a state and a country.

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natural-gas  climate  emission-reductions  renewable-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 15, 2016

I really like this quote from Chris Mooney’s analysis in the Washington Post last week – the speaker being Italian scientist Elena Verdolini, whose new research basically finds that solar and wind energy need big help from natural gas:

“If you have an electric car, you don’t need a diesel car in your garage sitting there. But in the case of renewables, it’s different, because if you have renewable electricity and that fails, then you need the fast acting gas sitting in your garage, so to speak.”

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natural-gas  fracking  emission-reductions  climate  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 11, 2016

Thanks to fracking, the United States has reduced CO2 emissions to levels not seen in more than two decades, allowing the U.S. to lead the world in that important climate category – as it leads the world in oil and natural gas production. Around the globe there’s a lot of talk about making climate progress; the United States is actually achieving that progress, and it is doing so without sacrificing jobs, economic growth, energy security or consumer affordability.

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natural-gas  emissions  epa34  carbon-dioxide  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 3, 2016

Some context for legal challenges to EPA’s final rule for new oil and natural gas sources, filed individually this week by a coalition of states, API and other organizations.

As we’ve noted before, methane emissions from field production of natural gas are falling – mainly because industry wants to capture as much of the primary component of natural gas as possible, to deliver to customers. Industry is on it, deploying technologies and know-how to prevent emissions during production. Bottom line: In a period of soaring production, we’ve had falling methane emissions.

This is happening under the current regulatory regime.

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