The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

american-energy  economy  jobs  energy-security  imports  growth 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 12, 2014

Bloomberg News: U.S. fuel imports fell to a 15-year seasonal low as refineries processed increasing domestic crude output, moving the nation closer to energy independence.

Deliveries slid 653,000 barrels a day to 1.68 million in the week ended June 6, the fewest for the period since 1999, the Energy Information Administration data showed today. The 28 percent drop was the biggest decline since the week ended June 18, 2013. Fuel imports peaked at 4.97 million barrels a day in October 2005.

“There’s a change in the dynamic,” said Phil Flynn, a senior market analyst at Price Futures Group in Chicago. “We’re not going to stop importing products but the overall number should move lower. We’re turning into a hub where products are both imported and exported based on price.”

Shipments to the U.S. from abroad have dropped as the shale boom provided refiners with an ample supply of cheaper domestic crude to make fuel. West Texas Intermediate, the U.S. benchmark crude, has traded at an average discount of $12 to Brent oil from the North Sea over the past four years. WTI traded at an average premium of more than $1 to the European grade from 1988 to 2008.

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american-energy  energy-security  economy  jobs  global-energy  global-markets 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 9, 2014

Wall Street Journal (Joseph Nye): HOUSTON — The United States produced enough energy to satisfy 84 percent of its needs in 2013, a rapid climb from its historic low in 2005, according to a report from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

The nation produced 81.7 quadrillion British thermal units of energy last year and consumed 97.5 quadrillion, the highest ratio since 1987. The nation’s energy output rose 18 percent from 2005 to 2013, as a surge in oil and gas production offset declines in coal. Meanwhile, its total energy used fell 2.7 percent during that period.

The nation’s ability to meet its own energy needs hit an all-time low in 2005, when the amount of energy produced domestically met just 69 percent of demand. The last time the United States’ energy production exceeded its energy use was in the 1950s, according to the Energy Information Administration, an agency of the Energy Department.

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economy  energy-security  environment  jobs  fracking  alaska  crude-oil 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 6, 2014

UPI: WASHINGTON --Strong growth in onshore U.S. oil and gas production means fewer problems from hurricanes, the analytical arm of the U.S. Energy Department said Wednesday.

Sunday marked the start of the Atlantic hurricane season. As of Wednesday, there are no cyclones reported in the Atlantic Ocean, though Tropical Storm Boris is headed north from the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico at a rate of 5 miles per hour.

Though offshore oil and gas installations may be shut in by any major storm in the Atlantic, EIA said inland production could make up for any shortfall.

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energy-security  american-energy  economy  jobs  fracking  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 2, 2014

EIA Today in Energy: Total U.S. energy production reached 81.7 quadrillion British thermal units (quads) in 2013, enough to satisfy 84% of total U.S. energy demand, which totaled 97.5 quads. Natural gas was the largest domestically produced energy resource for the third year in a row and, together with the other fossil fuels (coal, crude oil, and hydrocarbon gas liquids), accounted for more than three quarters of U.S. energy production. In total, the United States consumed 97.5 quads of energy, 82% of which was fossil fuels. Renewable and nuclear energy made up 10% and 8%, respectively, of U.S. energy consumption.

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american-energy  jobs  economy  fracking  lng-exports  exports  energy-security 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted May 30, 2014

The Hill: The Department of Energy (DOE) released two reports Thursday with favorable conclusions about the environmental impacts of exporting liquefied natural gas (LNG).

The department said it is not “reasonably foreseeable” that there would be any domestic environmental impacts from the increased natural gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. And in Europe and Asia, the natural gas would have much lower greenhouse gas emissions than coal when used for power generation.

The DOE is publishing the reports to gather comments on them and eventually use them in determining whether individual LNG export applications are in the country’s interest. Neither report is required by law, the agency said.

The reports came the same day the DOE proposed a new, streamlined process for considering applications to export LNG to countries with which the United States does not have a free trade agreement.

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energy-security  economy  jobs  energy-policy  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted May 28, 2014

The Hill (Charles McConnell): The two cornerstones of our global society that are fundamental to our lives today and for our future are 1) the affordability and security of our energy and 2) environmental responsibility. The balance and harmony of these two are what comprise energy sustainability, the topic I will be contributing to in the coming year for The Hill.

In my former role as assistant secretary of energy at the Department of Energy and my current position as executive director of Rice University's Energy and Environment Initiative, we are constantly challenged by this responsibility of energy sustainability in the utilization of fossil fuels. Our future will be determined by increasing energy requirements on a global basis for electricity, fuels and chemicals to meet a doubling of world demand by 2050. Fossil fuels will continue to be more than 80 percent of the world's fuel supply in 2050, as cited by the International Energy Agency, so it is not "if" we will be consuming coal, oil and natural gas, but "how." We must have a genuine "all of the above" energy strategy, and to do so, we must invest in fossil-fuel technology to ensure energy sustainability.

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fracking  american-energy  jobs  economy  energy-security  new-york  texas  ohio  keystone-xl-pipeline  ethanol 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 30, 2014

Albany Business Review: Some New York farmers, particularly those living in the state's Southern Tier, are in favor of high-volume hydraulic fracturing. Steuben County dairy farmer Terry Waters, 60, said it would "pull us out of the hole."

 

As farmers like Waters continue to face financial hardship due to rising costs, they are seeing their counterparts in Pennsylvania benefiting from the natural gas resources located underneath their properties.

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american-energy  energy-security  global-markets  jobs  lng-exports  emissions  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 28, 2014

Breaking Energy: Two timely research studies from think tanks inside the Beltway address energy security with particular focus on America’s new role in rearranging the established global energy order. This order is in flux precisely because of the renaissance in the American energy sector ignited by its shale (tight) oil and gas boom. Over the last decade, US crude oil and natural gas production has risen significantly. According to EIA projections in its AEO2014 Reference case, US natural gas production will continue to grow, increasing by 56% between 2012 and 2040. Similar gains are projected for US oil production.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  american-energy  energy-security  environment  fracking  california 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 24, 2014

Washington Post: If foot-dragging were a competitive sport, President Obama and his administration would be world champions for their performance in delaying the approval of the Keystone XL pipeline.

 

Last Friday afternoon, the time when officials make announcements they hope no one will notice, the State Department declared that it is putting off a decision on Keystone XL indefinitely — or at least, it seems, well past November’s midterm elections. This time, the excuse is litigation in Nebraska over the proposed route, because that might lead to a change in the project that various federal agencies will want to consider. The State Department might even decide to substantially restart the environmental review process. This is yet another laughable reason to delay a project that the federal government has been scrutinizing for more than five years.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  infrastructure  jobs  energy-security  fracking  manufacturing  technology 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 21, 2014

Forbes (Christopher Helman): Whenever businesses and bureaucrats don’t have the guts to stand behind a decision they’ve made, they release the news late on a Friday. In the case of the Obama administration’s move to delay indefinitely a decision to approve or deny the Keystone XL pipeline, it speaks volumes that the announcement was made not just on any Friday, but on the convergence of Good Friday and Passover.

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