The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

analysis  mississippi  income  ozone-regulations  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 7, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Mississippi. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and reviewed Florida, Kansas, Maryland and South Dakota earlier this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Mississippi, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  south-dakota  biofuels  e1534  energy  ethanol  income  renewable-fuel-standard  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 6, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with South Dakota. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and reviewed Florida, Kansas and Maryland earlier this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with South Dakota, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  natural-gas-consumption  electricity  emissions  eia34  methane  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 5, 2015

New government stats on falling carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from electrical power generation point to a good-news story on energy and climate, one that should grab the attention of policymakers nationally and in the states. This is seen in data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

Plotting CO2 emissions from the electric power sector from 1988 to this April, EIA reports emissions hit their lowest point for any month in 27 years. This is largely because of increased use of natural gas in power generation – a market choice that’s based on the availability and affordability of natural gas, as well as the fact it is clean-burning. 

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analysis  maryland  crude-oil-exports  income  energy  gasoline-prices  lng34  pricewaterhousecoopers  trade  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 5, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Maryland. We started this week with Florida and Kansas; the series began on June 29 with Virginia. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Maryland, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  energy-exports  crude-oil  domestic-production  economic-growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 4, 2015

Something we hear frequently (and too often from people who should know better), is that as long as the United States is an oil importer it shouldn’t export domestic crude. It sounds logical and certainly makes for a good headline. But the idea ignores reality and sound economic analysis.

A quick skim of government data on U.S. trade shows that goods imported into the United States are often goods that also are exported from the United States. The fact is that oil is traded globally, and the ebbs and flows of global supply affect us here in the U.S. Bruce Everett, who teaches oil market economics at Tufts University, explained in a recent article for Politico:

… it’s certainly true that the US will still require imported oil for the foreseeable future to meet our needs.  But the implication here is that exporting US crude oil would increase our import needs and therefore undermine national security. And that’s not how the oil market works. The US has an open economy, and American consumers pay world prices for oil – just as they do for wheat, corn, copper, gold and other internationally traded commodities.  Crude oil is sold in a single, integrated global market.  If the world oil price spikes, the US will suffer, along with everyone else, to the extent we rely on the global market for imports.  But exporting some domestically produced oil would not affect this equation.

Energy isolationism isn’t in the United States’ best interest – economically or from a security standpoint. While some argue that shutting in U.S. crude oil is better for America, that kind of faulty thinking ignores the way free markets work – and can work to America’s benefit if we lift the ban on exporting domestic crude.

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analysis  kansas  e1534  biofuels  income  regulation  renewable-fuels-standard  ethanol  wood-mackenzie  pricewaterhousecoopers 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 4, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Kansas. We started the series with Virginia on June 29. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Kansas, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  florida  crude-oil-exports  economy-and-energy  gasoline-prices  lng34  income  pricewaterhousecoopers  revenue  trade  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 3, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Florida. We started our focus on the state level with Virginia on June 29. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Florida, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  washington  crude-oil-exports  energy  income  gasoline-prices  lng-exports  pricewaterhousecoopers  revenue  trade  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 31, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Washington. Yesterday we looked at Alaska. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Washington, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  energy-exports  crude-oil  american-petroleum-institute  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 30, 2015

We’ve stressed the economic benefits of lifting the ban on U.S. crude oil exports – GDP growth, job creation and consumer savings – because they’re considerable and would affect virtually every American in a positive way. No less important are the benefits for American security and foreign policy from letting U.S. crude trade freely in the global marketplace. API President and CEO Jack Gerard:

“Experts across the academic and political spectrum agree that American exports would spur greater U.S. oil production, put more oil on the world market, and reduce the power that foreign suppliers have over our allies. Our ability to strengthen the global energy market against future disruptions will shape events around the globe, adding a key tool to America’s diplomatic arsenal.”

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analysis  alaska  arctic  beaufort-sea  chukchi-sea  income  oil-and-natural-gas  pricewaterhousecoopers  regulations  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted July 30, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Alaska. We started the week with a look at North Dakota. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Alaska, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

Read More