The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

oil-and-natural-gas-development  access  energy-investments  job-creation  energy-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 3, 2014

Here’s the president, lauding the lift America’s domestic energy revolution has provided the nation’s economy in a speech this week in Illinois:

“The first cornerstone is new investments in the energy and technologies that make America a magnet for good, middle-class jobs. So right off the bat, as soon as I came into office, we upped our investments in American energy to reduce our dependence on foreign oil and strengthen our own energy security.  And today, the number-one oil and gas producer in the world is no longer Russia or Saudi Arabia.  It’s America. For the first time in nearly two decades, we now produce more oil than we buy from other countries.  We’re advancing so fast in this area that two years ago I set a goal to cut our oil imports by half by – in half by 2020, and we’ve actually – we will meet that goal this year, six years ahead of schedule.” 

It’s good to hear the president talking about the benefits to America of resurgent oil and natural gas production here at home. He’s right: The United States is the world’s No. 1 producer of natural gas and is poised to be No. 1 in oil production. He’s also right that this domestic output has cut imports significantly, putting America on a path to zero net imports in the foreseeable future – a good bench mark for something everyone wants: genuine U.S. energy security.

Now let’s talk plainly.

These energy developments and their benefits have occurred without much help from this White House. They’ve happened even as the president’s actions and those of his administration have fallen well short of his “all-of-the-above” rhetoric on energy.

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oil-and-natural-gas-investments  infrastructure  job-creation  economic-growth  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 15, 2014

It’s one thing to talk about energizing the U.S. economy, it’s another to walk the talk. America’s oil and natural gas industry is doing that, with four companies ranked in the top 10 of the Progressive Policy Institute’s list of leaders in U.S. capital spending in 2013.

ExxonMobil ($11.07 billion), Chevron ($10.56 billion), ConocoPhillips ($6.35 billion) and Occidental Petroleum ($5.5 billion) ranked in the top 10 in U.S. capital spending – expenditures for plants, property and equipment. Also significant: The same four are in the top 10 of cumulative U.S. capital spending over the three years (2011-2013) PPI has compiled its “investment heroes” list.

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american-energy  oil-and-natural-gas  hydraulic-fracturing  afl-cio  access  american-petroleum-institute  economic-growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 28, 2014

Despite the hyper-partisanship currently flourishing in Washington, there is a potential tie that binds: American energy.

Thanks to advanced technologies, entrepreneurial risk-taking and abundant oil and natural gas reserves, U.S. energy is on the rise: We’re the world’s No. 1 producer of natural gas and likely to be No. 1 in crude oil production next year, according to the International Energy Agency. Our energy revolution is creating jobs, boosting the economy and increasing America’s energy security and influence in the world. It’s also a bridge to bipartisanship.

API Executive Vice President Louis Finkel touched on these themes in a recent op-ed for the Reno Gazette-Journaland in a presentation before the Nevada state convention of the AFL-CIO. 

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oil-and-natural-gas  economic-growth  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 3, 2014

It looks like a pretty solid national jobs report for June, with the 288,000 positions that were added  exceeding the hiring rate over the year’s first five months and unemployment dipping to 6.1 percent. That’s a good story. There’s an even better one deeper in the Labor Department data: The oil and natural gas industry and its supporting activities are setting the pace in job creation.

Consider: Comparing numbers in this report with those from a year ago, the oil and natural gas extraction and supporting sectors outperformed the private sector as a whole in terms of job growth and a number of other relevant measurements, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  access  regulation  permitting  infrastructure  lng-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 26, 2014

It’s good to see the U.S. House of Representatives advancing a true all-of-the-above energy strategy with legislation that would help increase access to domestic reserves, promote common-sense regulation and reasonable permitting policies, foster development of key energy infrastructure and capitalize on America’s energy superpower status.

All are elements in a working, all-of-the-above approach to energy. Combined with energy from coal, nuclear and renewables, increased development of American oil and natural gas and associated infrastructure will keep our economy and country running – today and tomorrow.

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us-energy-security  federal-lands  energy-production  oil-and-natural-gas-development  eia34  iea34  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 20, 2014

Let’s make a couple of points with the juxtaposition of the newest U.S. report on energy production on federal lands and a pair of new analyses people are talking about this week.

First, there’s this piece by the Manhattan Institute’s Jared Meyer on the Real Clear Energy website, asserting that surging U.S. crude oil production is playing a big role in keeping global crude prices stable despite turmoil around the world:

The most important contribution to oil's price stability has been the substantial increase in U.S. production. U.S. crude oil production has risen 50 percent since 2008, to 7,443 thousand barrels a day. This increase has been driven by advances in drilling technology. Hydraulic fracturing has opened up previously-known reserves that were either inaccessible or too cost-prohibitive for drilling.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  safe-operations  hydraulic-fracturing  methane-emissions  access  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 10, 2014

New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman’s Sunday piece highlighted a conversation he had a few weeks ago with President Obama, during which the president talked about energy and climate change. A few things stand out:

Realistic Policy

The president signaled that climate policy should consider the real-world roles that are being played by various energy sources, saying:

“… we’re not going to suddenly turn off a switch and suddenly we’re no longer using fossil fuels, but we have to use this time wisely, so that you have a tapering off of fossil fuels replaced by clean energy sources that are not releasing carbon.”

Sounds reasonable, given the forecast of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) in its 2014 Annual Energy Outlook – that fossil fuels’ share of total U.S. energy use will be 80 percent in 2040, down only slightly from where it was in 2012 (82 percent). Oil and natural gas, which supplied 63 percent of the energy we used in 2012, are projected to supply 61 percent in 2040. Oil and natural gas are America’s energy today and tomorrow. 

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american-energy  oil-and-natural-gas-development  lng-exports  hydraulic-fracturing  shale-benefits  drilling  access  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 6, 2014

America has a clear choice on energy. An historic American energy revolution is in progress -- thanks to vast shale reserves safely developed with advanced drilling technologies, industry innovation and leadership. This revolution is creating jobs, strengthening our economy and making our country more secure and muscular in the world. With the right energy choices the revolution can continue and grow.

Yet, somehow, Washington is conflicted. While the Obama administration embraces the shale revolution as integral to its all-of-the-above energy strategy, it advances policies fraught with the potential to needlessly hinder it. Instead of taking actions to enhance America’s energy renaissance, the administration is engaged in a regulatory march that quite likely could diminish it. Sustaining this energy revolution should be a no-brainer – not the brain-bender the administration is fostering with muddled vision and contradictory statements.

During a conference call with reporters this week, API President and CEO Jack Gerard discussed inconsistencies between what top administration officials say about U.S. energy development and what the agencies under them are doing to U.S. energy development.

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economic-growth  kentucky  access  income 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 14, 2014

Much is written about the macro-economic effects of public policy, including energy policy. America’s oil and natural gas industry supports 9.8 million jobs – 5.6 percent of total U.S. employment – and contributes $1.2 trillion to national GDP, according to a study by PwC. But what about the state impacts? Over the next couple of weeks we’ll push out a series of posts focusing on selected states to examine energy’s more localize economic effects, as well as other energy-related issues.

Let’s start with Kentucky, where energy means jobs.

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energy-outlook  access  domestic-oil-production  imports  energy-information-administration  fracking  technology 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 7, 2014

Take a good look at the chart below – brand-new from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). The green line disappearing into the horizontal axis between the years 2030 and 2040 is what U.S. energy self-sufficiency looks like.

This is a big, big deal – a goal of every U.S. president since Richard Nixon more than 40 years ago: the point where domestic production exceeds imports, which EIA never included in any of its projections. Until now.

Because of surging tight-oil production – oil from shale and other tight-rock formations, developed with advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling – the agency is including in its 2014 Annual Energy Outlook a high-production scenario under which net imports would reach near-zero between 2030 and 2040.

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