The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

american-energy  economy  exports  crude-oil  imports  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 23, 2014

Dallas Business Journal: So far this year, the U.S. has imported 369.8 million barrels of crude oil, according to the Energy Information Administration. Sure, that sounds like a lot, especially in light of the shale boom renaissance that has swept the country. Until you look at the past few years. For the same period in 2010, the U.S. imported 456.1 million barrels of crude, according to the EIA. So, in four years, oil imports have declined 19 percent and will likely continue to decrease in future years.

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american-energy  global-energy  global-markets  economy  fracking  new-york  jobs  keystone-xl-pipeline  regulations 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 22, 2014

Wall Street Journal: In early October, Saudi Arabia’s representative to OPEC surprised attendees at a New York seminar by revealing his government was content to let global energy prices slide. Nasser al-Dossary ’s message broke from decades of Saudi orthodoxy that sought to keep prices high by limiting global oil production, said people familiar with the session. That set the stage for Saudi Arabia’s oil mandarins to send crude prices tumbling late last month after persuading other members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries to keep production steady.

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fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  new-york  economy  jobs 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 19, 2014

Editorial pages and columnists weigh in on Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s decision to ban hydraulic fracturing in New York:

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fracking  economy  jobs  environment  new-york  new-york-moratorium 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 18, 2014

Yesterday, New York Gov. Cuomo’s administration issued a statewide ban on fracking, a move that denies New Yorkers – especially landowners in the Southern Tier –benefits associated with the drilling method that’s driving America’s energy revolution.

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energy-security  economy  american-energy  jobs  exports  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 17, 2014

San Antonio Express-News: Gasoline prices are low, U.S. oil production is growing and OPEC is widening discounts for oil. Congratulations America, this is what energy security looks like. Every U.S. president since Richard Nixon has called for energy security by either producing more, using less or switching fuel sources. Over the past 20 years, we’ve done all three, while encouraging an international market where no single actor can monopolize supply. “The thing about energy security is that you don’t want bad people overseas to be able to hurt you by suddenly changing the oil market,” said Eugene Gholz, an associate professor at the University of Texas’ LBJ School of Public Affairs. “You are secure if you are protected from shocks in supply, especially from politically induced shocks.”

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economy  jobs  american-energy  fracking  lng-exports  exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 16, 2014

EIA Today in Energy: The average U.S. household is expected to spend about $550 less on gasoline in 2015 compared with 2014, as annual motor fuel expenditures are on track to fall to their lowest level in 11 years. Lower fuel expenditures are attributable to a combination of falling retail gasoline prices and more fuel-efficient cars and trucks that reduce the number of gallons used to travel a given distance. Household gasoline costs are forecast to average $1,962 next year, assuming that EIA's price forecast, which is highly uncertain, is realized. Should the forecast be realized, motor fuel expenditures (gasoline and motor oil) in 2015 would be below $2,000 for the first time since 2009, according to EIA's December 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook(STEO).

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economy  jobs  american-energy  fracking  lng-exports  exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 15, 2014

Penn Live (Raymond Keating): At this weekend's annual Pennsylvania Society Holiday Dinner in New York City, I suspect energy policy will be a frequent topic of discussion — as it should rightfully be. From Benjamin Franklin's first experiments with electricity in Philadelphia to the energy revolution taking place in the Marcellus Shale natural gas play, the Keystone State has led the way in developing resources to the benefit of all Pennsylvanians and the entire nation.

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Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 12, 2014

Pittsburgh Business Times: It's no secret that the shale energy boom is having an impact on the manufacturing sector, but according to a report released Thursday by PwC US, that impact may be bigger than expected.

As a result of the surge in shale gas production, the firm increased its forecast on cost savings and long-term employment gains in domestic manufacturing. According to the report, PwC estimates the "shale effect" could bring an annual cost savings of $22.3 billion by 2030, assuming a high natural gas recovery and low price scenario.

In terms of job creation, PwC estimates continued shale activity will create 930,000 shale gas driven manufacturing jobs by 2030 and 1.41 million by 2040. 

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Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 11, 2014

Breaking Energy: The EPA has long promoted cellulosic ethanol as the future of biofuels, but technical challenges have kept production far below targets. A recent rule change allows RNG, renewable natural gas, to qualify as cellulosic biofuel even though RNG is not cellulosic, but this helps EPA appear to be meeting their goals.

 

RNG growth has been dramatic and is the lowest carbon vehicle fuel available today. Perhaps the EPA should be promoting a Renewable Gas Standard instead of a Renewable Fuel Standard.

 

In 2013, production of cellulosic ethanol was effectively zero, even though the legislated target volume for 2013 was 1 billion gallons. In August 2013, EPA reduced the target to 6 million gallons, and again reduced the target retroactively to 810,185 gallons, less than 1 million. By all accounts this represents a complete failure of the cellulosic ethanol program. In July 2014 the EPA revised the cellulosic biofuel rules to allow RNG to be categorized as cellulosic.

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american-energy  economy  growth  jobs  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 10, 2014

Reuters: A surge of oil and gas production will drive the U.S. economy 1 percent higher in 2040 than it would have otherwise grown, and energy exports will only stoke the expansion, an independent study on energy policy concluded on Tuesday.

New drilling technologies such as 'fracking' have unlocked an abundance of fossil fuels from shale deposits and the bounty will both jolt the economy and increase tax receipts, according to the study from the Congressional Budget Office.

Officials estimate "real (inflation-adjusted) GDP product will be about two-thirds of 1 percent higher in 2020 and about 1 percent higher in 2040 than it would have been without the development of shale resources," the report finds.

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