The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

us-crude-oil-production  global-markets  shale-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  saudi-arabia  exxonmobil  epa-regulation  pipelines  utica-shale 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 4, 2014

National Journal: World oil producers have put oil prices into a free fall, refusing to pare back global supplies in the hopes that low prices will derail the fracking-backed production boom in the U.S. and preserve OPEC's power over world energy markets.

But global analysts are skeptical that the move will work.

The basic reason: Prices remain high enough to keep pumping. "Looking out there, it seems like there's a huge amount of oil that can be produced at $60, $70 per barrel," said Michael Lynch, president of consulting firm Strategic Energy and Economic Research, referring to the prices for Brent crude oil, a global reference point.

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maryland  safe-operations  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  fracking  natural-gas-development  shale-energy  tax-revenues  royalty-payments  lng-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 2, 2014

Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley’s recent announcement – that he plans to lift the state’s three-year moratorium on hydraulic fracturing, possibly clearing the way for future natural gas development – is potentially good news for the state, its citizens and America’s broader energy picture.

A new report by the state’s Department of the Environment and the Department of Natural Resources details some of the possible benefits:Garrett County in western Maryland could gain as many as 2,425 new jobs while realizing $3.6 million in tax revenues and $13.5 million in severance tax revenues.Neighboring Allegany County could see as many as 908 new jobs, $1.8 million in tax revenues and $2.3 million in severance tax revenues over 10 years. “Royalty payments to the owners and lessors of mineral rights could provide significant income,” the report says.

Significantly, the department concludes what a number of other states have found and are demonstrating – that advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling to develop natural gas and oil from shale and other tight-rock formations can be conducted safely and efficiently.

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american-energy  oil-and-natural-gas-production  shale-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  fracking  crude-oil  exports  gasoline-prices 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 27, 2014

Happy Thanksgiving everybody.

When it comes to energy there’s much for which Americans can give thanks.

We have plentiful and accessible reserves of oil and natural gas that fuel healthy, mobile, modern lifestyles.

We enjoy safe and secure crude oil imports from Canada, our neighbor and ally and No. 1 source of imported oil.

Our country is served by a vibrant, modern industry – one that’s second to none in the use of safe, hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, offshore development and environmental awareness.

America keeps running thanks to a vast pipeline network and the world’s biggest, most-efficient refineries. And there’s more.

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lng-exports  natural-gas-development  economic-growth  job-creation  trade  shale-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 13, 2014

A good deal of the buzz generated by America’s ongoing energy revolution has centered on the way surging domestic production is changing the crude oil imports picture. No question, it’s a pretty one, with net imports as a share of consumption falling to levels not seen in nearly three decades. That’s great news for job creation, the economy, our balance of trade and America’s energy security.

But here’s another pretty picture: declining imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG). Actually, “declining” is too mild a term for what we’re seeing. Thanks to energy developed from shale using hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, the U.S. has become the world’s No. 1 natural gas producer – which has dramatically cut the need to shop the world market for supplies of natural gas, illustrated in plummeting LNG imports.

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shale-energy  lng-exports  fracking-chemicals  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  natural-gas-pipelines 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 12, 2014

EIA Today in Energy Blog: Increased natural gas production is projected to satisfy 60% to 80% of a potential increase in demand for added liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports from the Lower 48 states, according to recently released EIA analysis. The report, Effect of Increased Levels of Liquefied Natural Gas Exports on U.S. Energy Market, considered the long-term effects of several LNG export scenarios specified by the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The study also considered implications for natural gas prices, consumption, primary energy use, and energy-related emissions. Effects on overall economic growth were positive but modest. A discussion of caveats and limitations of the analysis is also included.

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american-energy  oil-and-natural-gas-development  economic-growth  job-creation  keystone-xl-pipeline  shale-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 4, 2014

Even before Americans went to the polls Tuesday, it’s clear American-made energy is this year’s winner. You could see it in pre-election public opinion surveying showing overwhelming support for increased production of domestic oil and natural gas as a job creator (90 percent), a national priority (87 percent) and as a boon to consumers (79 percent).

Regardless of who wins the most seats in Congress, the nation’s leaders should view policy choices with the knowledge that Americans strongly believe the ongoing U.S. energy revolution is a catalyst for individual prosperity, overall economic growth and national security. API President and CEO Jack Gerard, in a guest post for The Hill:

It may take weeks and a few run-off elections to determine control of Congress. But the American people have already given the House and Senate a clear mandate:  create jobs, boost the economy and advance America’s energy security through commonsense energy policies.

Here’s how we know this is true: As you look across the expanse of America, represented in the different state contests for the U.S. Senate, there’s broad bipartisan support for U.S. energy.

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hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  fracking  oil-and-natural-gas-development  safe-operations  interior-department  shale-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 28, 2014

In an interview with the Huffington Post, U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, in just a handful of minutes, does a pretty good job answering some of the most common attacks on hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling made by opponents of fracking – many of whom apparently want no part of the job creation, increased U.S. energy security and reduced emissions of methane and carbon dioxide that safe and responsible fracking brings. Jewell:

“Fracking has been around for over 60 years. It is the ability to actually unlock oil and gas from reservoirs away from the wellbore. New techniques with directional drilling and staged fracking have enabled people to direct those fractures into formations that release a lot of oil and gas a long way away – maybe two miles from the actual wellhead.”

In a nutshell she describes the marriage of advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling that is responsible for America’s ongoing energy renaissance – dramatically increasing domestic oil and natural gas production from vast shale reserves to the point where the U.S. now is No. 1 in the world in natural gas production and is expected to be No. 1 in oil output soon.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  us-crude-oil-production  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  shale-energy  economic-benefits  job-creation  global-markets 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 16, 2014

Early in a panel discussion of energy policy and politics hosted by Real Clear Politics, the question was asked whether U.S. voters pay much attention to energy issues in an election year. RCP tweeted panelist/Wall Street Journal energy reporter Amy Harder’s response - that voters only notice energy when the prices are high.

Certainly, that’s generally been an accurate analysis. Less than a decade ago energy issues were challenging for U.S. policymakers staring at flat or declining domestic oil and natural gas production

But the U.S. energy picture has been dramatically altered by surging production here at home – an energy revolution made possible by advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling and vast resources in shale and other tight-rock formations. Result: Good news in the absence of challenging energy developments – for U.S. consumers (if not for hosts of events on the intersection of energy and politics).

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shale-energy  marcellus-natural-gas  investments  income  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 15, 2014

Natural gas production in the Marcellus Shale continues to surge – and with it, industry spending on construction and maintenance, according to a new study.

The latest drilling productivity report from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) projects Marcellus natural gas output will hit 15,828 million cubic feet per day (mcf/d) or about 37.1 percent of production from the major U.S. shale plays. EIA expects Marcellus output will top 16,000 mcf/d in November.

The production gains are reflected in industry spending on workers in construction and maintenance from 2008 to 2014 – the subject of the new study by the Oil and Natural Gas Industry Labor-Management Committee. The study showed spending grew more than 60 percent between 2012 and 2013, reaching $5 billion, resulting in a 40 percent increase in jobs in eight trades (union and non-union members included). Another $6.5 billion already is committed for 2014, the study reports.

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