The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

news  energy-exports  crude-oil  liquefied-natural-gas  pipelines  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  ozone-standards  canadian-oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 27, 2015

Wall Street Journal op-ed (John Hess): While one can debate the reasons for the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries’ decision in November to continue flooding the oil markets, the fact is that this is squeezing many U.S. shale oil producers out of business. Oil prices have dropped by 50% in the past six months, and crude oil inventories in the U.S. have grown from 350 million barrels last year to more than 480 million barrels today.

Part of the reason inventory has ballooned is that crude produced in the U.S. is literally trapped here, because American firms are not allowed to sell it overseas. An antiquated rule bans crude oil exports from the lower 48 American states, even though producers could earn $5-$14 more per barrel by selling on the world market. At this moment the U.S. government is considering lifting sanctions on Iranian crude oil exports. Why not lift the self-imposed “sanctions” on U.S. crude exports that have been in place for the past four decades?

The export ban is a relic of a previous era, put in place around the time of the 1973 Arab oil embargo against the U.S., when Washington thought very differently about ensuring America’s energy needs. Other measures related to the 1973 embargo, such as price controls and rationing, were eliminated decades ago, as policy makers realized that they impeded, rather than aided, American energy security. But the ban on crude oil exports persists.

There is no defensible justification for the continued ban on the export of U.S. crude oil.

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news  energy-exports  lng34  crude-oil  pipelines  regulation  shale-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 24, 2015

The Hill Op-ed (U.S. Reps. Calvert and Israel): These days there doesn’t seem to be many things Democrats and Republicans can agree on, but after a recent bipartisan Congressional Delegation trip to Ukraine, we came back in agreement on one thing. Visiting Kiev, and speaking with Ukraine’s leaders it is clear that while their economy is faltering, there are steps that we can take, in addition to sanctions, that will hamper Russia’s economy and future border advances. …

… It has become clear to us, and many others, that the U.S. is sitting on a unique opportunity to advance our economic and national security goals.  By increasing our ability to export natural gas – in the form of liquefied natural gas or LNG – to Europe, the U.S. can weaken Russia’s strategic stronghold while boosting our domestic economy by increasing energy exports.

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energy-exports  oil-and-natural-gas-development  economic-growth  ozone  regulation  pipelines  innovation  technology 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 14, 2015

The National Interest (James Jay Carafano): Increasing American production and export of energy is a win-win-win proposition. It would enhance our national security, make international energy markets more free, and address environmental issues realistically. The next president should lead the campaign for an American energy export agenda. In the meantime, the present Congress can do much to prepare for the march.

The acme of presidential leadership is crafting policies that make the nation safe, free, and prosperous. Satisfying all three priorities is often the Oval Office's greatest challenge. It is like single-handedly trying to get squabbling triplets into their car seats. Yet, the confluence of geopolitics, America's energy abundance, and economic and environmental realities offers an almost unprecedented opportunity to do this successfully.

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american-energy  engineers  education  refiners  fracking  pipelines  gasoline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 2, 2015

Indy Star: Kalese Hoggard is spending part of her spring break back in the classroom, but she's not learning from books. She's working with a team of students to build rockets and robots at Walker Career Center. It's fun, she said, but there's a more important reason: "Women engineers — we need more of them. And I'm going to be one. Or a neurologist," she said. Kalese is among 20 eighth-grade girls from Stonybrook, Raymond Park and Creston middle schools in Warren Township who are participating in Gateway Academy STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) Camp.

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american-energy  fracking  economy  energy-security  innovation  efficiency  pipelines 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 1, 2015

Wall Street Journal (Holman W. Jenkins Jr.): If not for fracking, oil would probably be $200 a barrel and gasoline $6.50 in the U.S. Western economies would likely be in free fall. The grudging U.S. recovery would be in retreat. The modest and possibly illusory green shoots seen in Europe, largely a function of cheap oil and a strong dollar, would wither. Japan would be even more of a write-off than it already is.

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innovation  technology  jobs  fracking  new-york  maryland  pipelines  gulf 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 31, 2015

TribLive (Blog): I was taken with the mud the moment they told me it could talk. I had some built-up interest, sure. But its communicative abilities really were the clincher for me. This is the story of how I explored a drilling rig, discovered drilling mud, and got pretty into it.

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american-energy  regulation  fracking  texas  ohio  pipelines 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 26, 2015

The Daily Signal: Although the White House Council of Economic Advisers’ annual report to Congress largely restates the President’s State of the Union address on “middle-class economics,” it includes a welcome suggestion. This glimmer of hope is a lone, but surprising sentence in the report’s energy chapter: “The regulatory structure for addressing local environmental concerns, especially around land and water use [for hydraulic fracturing operations], exists primarily at the State and local level.” If the Obama Administration were to take the advice, it would mark a positive step in the right direction after years of moving in the opposite direction.

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trade  american-energy  fracking  exports  pipelines  small-business 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 6, 2015

Wall Street Journal: The U.S. oil boom is redrawing America’s trade picture. Petroleum imports accounted for less than 20% of the nation’s trade deficit last year, down from more than 40% only five years earlier, according to figures for 2014 released Thursday. But the overall U.S. appetite for overseas goods didn’t diminish over the period, which started with the global economy’s first full year of expansion after the 2007-09 recession. Imports of just about everything else have surged as Americans substitute other goods for foreign oil, leaving a growing trade deficit. “If we hadn’t had this oil boom I think our deficit would be lot larger than it is right now,” said IHS Global Insight economist Patrick Newport. “It’s a game-changer.”

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crude-oil  exports  infrastructure  permit-delays  regulation  education  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  pipelines  new-york-natural-gas 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 22, 2015

The Bakken Magazine: “Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200.”

This is the dreaded phrase on the “Go to Jail Card” that you’ve likely drawn, or at least heard of, when playing the game of Monopoly. Drawing this card is an all-around bummer. You lose a chance at scooping up valuable property before others do, you don’t get to collect $200 that you might need to purchase property, and it increases the chance that you lose the game. But at least it’s just a game. Right?

Wrong. What many people probably don’t realize is that we’re in a real-life game similar to Monopoly, but this one is focused on the global oil market, not property. And, it just so happens that we’re stuck holding the “Do not pass Go” card.

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us-crude-oil-production  global-markets  shale-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  saudi-arabia  exxonmobil  epa-regulation  pipelines  utica-shale 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 4, 2014

National Journal: World oil producers have put oil prices into a free fall, refusing to pare back global supplies in the hopes that low prices will derail the fracking-backed production boom in the U.S. and preserve OPEC's power over world energy markets.

But global analysts are skeptical that the move will work.

The basic reason: Prices remain high enough to keep pumping. "Looking out there, it seems like there's a huge amount of oil that can be produced at $60, $70 per barrel," said Michael Lynch, president of consulting firm Strategic Energy and Economic Research, referring to the prices for Brent crude oil, a global reference point.

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