The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

analysis  access  oil-and-natural-gas-development  global-markets  oil-imports  american-petroleum-institute  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 18, 2015

Here’s the first of a series of posts sparked by speeches and presentations at this week’s U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) energy conference. U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz set the tone for EIA’s event, noting that the U.S. faces a set of energy challenges, vulnerabilities and opportunities. At the heart of the discussion: America’s energy resurgence. Moniz:

“By almost any simple measure for sure, our energy security position has been enhanced a great deal over the last several years: No. 1 producer of oil and gas, oil imports in terms of a fraction of crude plus products back at 1952 levels. In fact, our production increasing so substantially in the last five years that it has become a critical factor in global pricing dynamics, challenging decades-old assumptions by OPEC, for example. We have mothballed LNG import facilities are being repurposed for exports, likely to begin next year, and, frankly, likely to see us in several years at least become one of the major LNG players on the global scene.”

Moniz credited the energy revolution for rejuvenating U.S. manufacturing, particularly among energy-intensive industries that are capitalizing on affordable natural gas for power and/or as a feedstock for a variety of products. America’s increased use of natural gas also has helped lead U.S. efforts to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, he said.

In all of the above, the secretary certainly makes good point. Thanks to innovative, advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, the U.S. is the world’s energy-producing leader. America is stronger and its citizens are more prosperous because we’re producing more of the energy we use right here at home.

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news  oil-and-natural-gas-development  us-energy  bp234  oil-production  energy-exports  ethanol  climate-change  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 10, 2015

BloombergBusiness The U.S. has taken Russia’s crown as the biggest oil and natural-gas producer in a demonstration of the seismic shifts in the world energy landscape emanating from America’s shale fields.

U.S. oil production (green line in chart, left) rose to a record last year, gaining 1.6 million barrels a day, according to BP Plc’s Statistical Review of World Energy released on Wednesday. Gas output also climbed, putting America ahead of Russia as a producer of the hydrocarbons combined.

The data showing the U.S.’s emergence as the top driller confirms a trend that’s helped the world’s largest economy reduce imports, caused a slump in global energy prices and shifted the country’s foreign policy priorities.

“We are truly witnessing a changing of the guard of global energy suppliers,” BP Chief Economist Spencer Dale said in a presentation. “The implications of the shale revolution for the U.S. are profound.”

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analysis  north-carolina  oil-and-natural-gas-development  economic-growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 8, 2015

David McGowan was named executive director of the North Carolina Petroleum Council in 2013. Previously, McGowan served as director of regulatory affairs for the North Carolina Association of Realtors. He is a graduate of the University of North Carolina. Below, he talks with Energy Tomorrow about the potential for energy development in North Carolina, as well as the challenges for industry in his state. 

Q: What do North Carolinians think about the state’s onshore and offshore energy potential? Is it something people are aware of, and what do you believe they want most from industry as it develops that energy?

McGowan: An overwhelming bipartisan majority of North Carolinians support more domestic exploration and production for oil and natural gas resources, both onshore and offshore. According to a Harris poll in January, 91 percent of the state’s citizens believe that we should produce more energy here at home to strengthen our energy security. Furthermore, 90 percent believe that increased oil and natural gas production will lead to more jobs here in the state. North Carolinians also understand that our country and our state need oil and gas resources for our economy to grow. They understand that more domestic production increases global supplies, putting downward pressure on costs and benefiting consumers.

Finally, most people in the state understand that energy production and environmental stewardship are not mutually exclusive. They know that we can safely and responsibly develop our natural resources, create jobs and stimulate the economy – all the while ensuring that the health of our citizens and environment are protected.

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analysis  epa34  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  water  shale-energy  oil-and-natural-gas-development  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 4, 2015

After five years and millions of taxpayer dollars, EPA says what we in industry and others have said for some time: Safe hydraulic fracturing doesn’t threaten our drinking water. The salient quote from EPA’s draft report about fracking and associated operational components:

“We did not find evidence that these mechanisms have led to widespread, systemic impacts on drinking water resources in the United States.”

EPA’s findings discredit scaremongering used by fracking opponents and should help focus attention where industry is and has been focused – on continuous improvements in operational skill, guided by a set of rigorous best practices, and on technological advances.

EPA’s findings also effectively endorse the strong environmental stewardship that is being exercised by state regulators, who have been busy while EPA studied.

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analysis  women-in-energy-industry  workforce  colorado  american-petroleum-institute  oil-and-natural-gas-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 4, 2015

A big event in Denver this week, highlighting the career opportunities for women in the oil and natural gas industry. “Women in Power” was attended by about 150 of Denver’s most influential female leaders and launched a larger Colorado initiative designed to help attract women to the industry and to retain them for life-long careers.

The Denver event was keynoted by Democratic strategist Celinda Lake and Republican strategist Linda DiVall, co-authors of a study released earlier this year  that found the chief factor in increasing female representation in the oil and natural gas industry workforce is making them aware of the benefits of industry employment – including pay and security benefits and the chance for career advancement.

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analysis  oil-and-natural-gas-development  production  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  access  texas  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 28, 2015

We often call the United States a global energy superpower, and it is – No. 1 in the world in the production of petroleum and natural gas hydrocarbons in 2014, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

This is the result of an ongoing energy revolution, harnessing vast oil and natural gas reserves found in shale and other tight-rock formations, thanks to advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. America has the energy and the technologies, but also the robust industrial sector necessary to completely rewrite our country’s energy story.

Here’s another way to look at it: A number of individual U.S. states now rival the world’s major energy-producing countries. In other words, as separate countries those states would be world leaders in energy output.

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news  regulations  permit-delays  infrastructure  oil-and-natural-gas-development  liquefied-natural-gas  energy-exports  refineries  epa34  ethanol  shale-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 27, 2015

Wall Street Journal commentary (Engler and McGarvey): America’s business and labor leaders agree: President Obama and Congress can do more to modernize the permitting process for infrastructure projects—airports, factories, power plants and pipelines—which at the moment is burdensome, slow and inconsistent.

Gaining approval to build a new bridge or factory typically involves review by multiple federal agencies—such as the Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Forest Service, the Interior Department, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Bureau of Land Management—with overlapping jurisdictions and no real deadlines. Often, no single federal entity is responsible for managing the process. Even after a project is granted permits, lawsuits can hold things up for years—or, worse, halt a half-completed construction project.

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analysis  oil-and-natural-gas-development  gasoline-price-factors  crude-markets  federal-leases  permitting  hydraulic-fracturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 21, 2015

Consumers have felt some of the fruits of America’s energy revolution, API Chief Economist John Felmy told reporters in a pre-Memorial Day conference call

Felmy noted that drivers are paying about $1 less per gallon of gasoline on average nationwide than they did at this time a year ago, according to AAA. He said that thanks to advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, the U.S. energy resurgence has offset production declines in other parts of the world, which has resulted in a more stable global market for crude oil – and relief at the gas pump. He added that the U.S. energy picture currently is characterized by strong domestic supply, moderate demand, increasingly efficient production and a refining sector that’s turning out record amounts of gasoline.

Felmy said the right energy choices by our country’s leaders can help continue the energy revolution.

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news  pipelines  infrastructure  oil-and-natural-gas-development  epa34  regulation  lng-exports  cellulosic-ethanol 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 21, 2015

Fort Worth Star-Telegram (Weinstein): Thanks to what’s sometimes called the “shale revolution,” America has re-emerged as an energy superpower.

Even with prices 40 percent lower than a year ago, we remain the world’s No. 1 producer of crude oil and other liquid hydrocarbons. Imports of oil have dropped from 60 percent of consumption to about 35 percent just in the past five years. We’re also the world’s largest producer of natural gas.

Both our oil and natural gas output would be even higher if not for regulatory and infrastructure constraints.

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analysis  access  energy-exports  energy-supply  oil-and-natural-gas-development  senate  american-petroleum-institute  economic-growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 19, 2015

Solid bipartisan support for important energy legislation is on display in the U.S. Senate, with members of a key committee considering a number of ways to increase access to domestic supplies of oil and natural gas – as well as bills ending 1970s-era restrictions on U.S. crude oil exports.

Energy security is about having secure, reliable energy supplies to fuel broad economic expansion and create opportunity for individual Americans. When we remove outdated export restrictions, allowing U.S. energy to reach global markets, studies have detailed how domestic production will be stimulated – again, creating jobs and economic growth here at home. API Executive Vice President Louis Finkel talks about new legislation offered by Democrat Heidi Heitkamp, similar to legislation offered last week by Republican Lisa Murkowski, that would lift the crude export ban and boost U.S. energy:

“Bipartisan leadership on this issue keeps the focus on the consumers and workers that will benefit from free trade in crude oil. … Study after study shows that lifting outdated limits on crude exports will allow America to create more jobs, cut the trade deficit, grow the economy, and put downward pressure on fuel costs. Exports will help keep U.S. production strong in a tough market, and they will provide our allies with an important alternative to energy from less friendly regimes.”

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