The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

exports  fracking  lng34  natural-gas  taxes 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 25, 2013

Fuel Fix BlogReport: Petrochemical Plants See Big Benefits from Low-Cost Natural Gas

Low-cost shale natural gas has made North America – specifically the United States – a more competitive region for petrochemical producers. The sector has plans to add $120 billion in investments through 2030, according to an IHS analysis. 

AEI Ideas Carpe Diem BlogSpectacular Rise in America’s Oil Output

The U.S. last week reached a 21-year  high for domestic oil production, more than 7.3 million barrels of oil per day, something that is “nothing short of phenomenal,” writes blogger Mark J. Perry. The last time U.S. output exceeded the 7.3 million bpd mark was in 1992.

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emissions  ethanol  fracking  natural-gas  new-york  lng34 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 17, 2013

Washington TimesIs It Time to End Ethanol Vehicle Fuel mandates?

Steve Goreham recaps the pros and cons in the ethanol, Renewable Fuel Standard debate.

Press ConnectsGuest Viewpoint: NY Can’t Afford to Pass on Natural Gas

In a guest piece, New York resident Bob Tiberio writes that affordable energy “is the lifeblood of our economy and lowers the cost of almost everything we make and use. It drives economic growth and gives the United States a competitive edge in global markets. For most Americans, a high “quality of life” begins with low cost energy, which increasingly means natural gas from shale.”

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access  keystone-xl-pipeline  lng34  oil-and-natural-gas-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 28, 2013

Americans heard President Obama talk about his “all-of-the-above” energy strategy during last year’s campaign. They heard him praise the revolution in natural gas production from shale while hailing the rise in oil production on his watch. The words were encouraging, but it’s time for action. Erik Milito, API’s group director for upstream and industry operations, outlined the stakes during a conference call with reporters:

“We hope the president will take actions to match the ‘all-of-the-above’ energy strategy that was a central theme in his re-election campaign. We’ve heard rhetorical support for oil and natural gas, but it will take the right policies to meet the administration’s own projections that show oil and natural gas will be critical to meeting America’s energy needs for decades to come.”

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natural-gas  lng34  exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 25, 2013

New analysis by the consulting firm ICF International indicates significant potential economic benefits from the export of U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG):

  • An average across the studied cases of 213,000 new jobs supported by LNG exports from 2015 to 2035.
  • An average across the studied cases of 24,000 new jobs in the manufacturing sector over the same period.
  • More than $720 billion in cumulative economic growth over the same period.
  • An additional 291,000 barrels per day in natural gas liquids – the critical feedstock for chemicals and other industrial sectors – by 2035.

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trade  lng34  exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 22, 2013

A bipartisan group of U.S. senators has written Energy Secretary Steven Chu, urging the government to support liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports for the good of our economy and to improve our trade balance. Key points in their reasoning:

  • Increasing demand for U.S. natural gas will be easily met by increases in production. The letter cites U.S. Energy Information Administration projections that a 20 percent increase in domestic natural gas demand between now and 2040 will be fully offset by a 40 percent increase in production.
  • Domestic production will be stimulated if producers have greater access to U.S. natural gas reserves onshore and offshore – as well as greater access to “consumption markets.” This will bring job creation, economic growth and generate an in-flow of revenue from abroad.
  • Artificial restraints on the marketing of U.S. natural gas tend to inhibit future investment in development.

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domestic-energy  exports  lng34  liquefied-natural-gas 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 28, 2013

The campaign against the free trade of U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) generally goes down a few of tracks:

  • Consumers will be hurt as “excessive” LNG exports stretch demand, making natural gas more expensive here at home.
  • Blocking or restricting LNG exports will best fuel U.S. economic growth.
  • The federal government needs to prevent “unrestricted” or “unlimited” LNG exports.

Fortunately, this doesn’t have to be one opinion against another. The U.S. Energy Department has a recent, comprehensive study on these issues in hand, in addition to reports and studies by other reputable organizations. The conclusions, based on scholarly research, should guide the federal decision on licensing the construction of LNG export facilities – more than a dozen of which are awaiting approval.

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trade  lng34  exports  energy-policy  energy-economy  domestic-energy-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 25, 2013

This week API, on behalf of the U.S. oil and natural gas industry, furnished comments on the Energy Department’s 2012 study of the impact of exporting U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG). You can read them in full here, but let’s cover some of the main points.

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lng-exports  lng34  energy-policy  domestic-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 27, 2012

The continuing debate over America’s shale energy wealth – both natural gas and oil – boils down to this: Will we safely and responsibly develop those resources with cutting-edge fracking technology or fumble away an historic chance to take greater control over our energy future by leaving those resources in the ground?

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natural-gas  lng34  keystone-xl  exports  energy-policy  energy  domestic-energy  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 19, 2012

We’ve been talking about energy and the president’s campaign commitment to increase domestic oil and natural gas production. There are a number of ways he can follow through – approve the full Keystone XL pipeline, open new areas for oil and gas development, rein in unnecessary federal efforts to regulate hydraulic fracturing

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