The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

keystone-xl-pipeline  labor-unions  american-jobs  economic-benefits  canadian-oil-sands  congress  president-obama  state-department 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 13, 2015

As the Keystone XL pipeline debate in Congress continues, working Americans are pushing back against those – including President Obama – who dismiss as “temporary” the jobs the project would support.   

North America’s Building Trades Unions (NABTU) published an open letter to members of Congress that asks a simple question: “When did our careers and livelihoods become fodder for disdain and ridicule?”

Great question, because disparaging the more than 42,000 jobs Keystone XL would support during its construction – according to the U.S. State Department – has become a standard line of attack from Keystone XL opponents, from the president on down.

The union ad makes clear that those who work in the construction trades have had it with politicians who are double-tongued about the need to put Americans back to work and the need for infrastructure investment – while brushing off the way Keystone XL could help with both.

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american-energy  taxes  exports  jobs  economy  manufacturing  fracking  lng-exports  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 13, 2015

Forbes (Mark P. Mills): It was predictable. Oil gets cheap and now there’s a contingent in Congress looking to slap a new tax onto gasoline. What’s surprising is that there are some conservatives in both Congress and the pundictocracy also receptive to the notion, including the estimable Charles Krauthammer. It’s a terrible idea. Instead of raising taxes, the Congress should be focused on helping the industry that created the oil glut, and that nearly single-handedly sustained the U.S. economy through the recovery from the Great Recession: America’s shale producers who are now subject to nearly unprecedented foreign market manipulation.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  infrastructure  economic-growth  state-department  president-obama  environmental-review  canadian-oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 13, 2015

The federal approval process for cross-border pipelines (and there are many) historically has taken 18 to 24 months, yet the White House says that more than six years isn't enough time to determine whether the Keystone XL pipeline is in the national interest.

Perhaps the State Department can help them out with analysis that argues that infrastructure of this nature is in the national interest – a point grasped by a strong majority of Americans in the Keystone XL debate – which seems to elude the White House. Now, if the White House doesn’t want to listen to what its own State Department says about infrastructure, maybe another voice will be more persuasive.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  president-obama  infrastructure  investment  economic-benefits  job-creation  nebraska  state-department  canada  congress  refinieries 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 10, 2015

Throughout the Keystone XL pipeline’s long wait for federal approval, President Obama has used one excuse after another to deflect responsibility for blocking a project that polls in the 70s with the American people, one that would support thousands of U.S. jobs and help move the country closer to North American energy security. All along the way the president could have exercised his authority to say yes to all of the above but deferred instead.

The president said environmental questions needed answers, and they were provided by his own State Department, which cleared Keystone XL in five separate environmental reviews.

The president said the cross-border approval process – required because Keystone XL would cross the U.S.-Canadian border – needed to run its course. It did and then some, stretching now to more than six years when historically, cross-border approvals are granted in 18 to 24 months.

The president said Nebraska needed to work out the pipeline’s route through that state, which it did. Then the president said the state’s Supreme Court would have to settle a legal challenge over the re-routing process.

On Friday, Nebraska’s high court rejected that challenge, confirming the assessment of the state Department of Environmental Quality and the governor’s recommendation to the State Department – leaving the project with only one remaining obstacle: President Obama.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  oil-sands  economy  energy-security  environment  jobs  trade  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 9, 2015

The Hill: The Nebraska Supreme Court on Friday struck down a lower court's challenge to the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, handing a key victory to proponents of the project. The decision overturns a lower court's ruling that had sided with landowners challenging Keystone's path through Nebraska. The lower court said a 2012 law that allowed Nebraska Gov. Dave Heineman (R) to greenlight the route was against the state's constitution.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  canada  economic-benefits  infrastructure  state-department  president-obama 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 8, 2015

With legislation to advance the long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline moving ahead in the Senate, potentially attracting a misguided veto from President Obama, some important numbers:

76 – The number of months Keystone XL has been blocked by the Obama administration. Historically, approvals for cross-border pipeline projects take 18 to 24 months. Keystone XL’s history is something quite different – the story of how a shovel-ready infrastructure project was needlessly hijacked by politics.

830,000 – The number of barrels of North American oil per day that would flow through Keystone XL to U.S. refineries on the Gulf Coast, the vast majority of which would be turned into valuable fuel products.

42,100 – The number of U.S. jobs that would be supported during Keystone XL’s construction. That’s not industry’s number. That’s the number coming from President Obama’s own State Department. When he and others dismiss the project’s jobs impact, it reveals a serious lack of understanding of the way large infrastructure construction creates a positive ripple across the economy in terms of direct jobs, indirect jobs and induced jobs – all of which the White House fully appreciated when it was making the case for its federal stimulus package in 2009.   

5 – The number of Keystone XL environmental reviews conducted by President Obama’s own Department of State.

5 – The number of State Department environmental reviews that have concluded Keystone XL would have no significant climate impact.

2 – The number of Pinocchios just awarded by the Washington Post’s Fact Checker to claims that Keystone XL will negatively impact the environment and that it would only be only a conduit for oil to be shipped overseas. (This follows the Three Pinocchios given to President Obama last fall for saying oil transported by Keystone XL would go “everywhere else” but the U.S. Bottom line, that’s a lot of Pinocchios.)

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economy  jobs  trade  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline  affordable-energy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 8, 2015

Wall Street Journal: Justin Friend ’s parents have doctoral degrees and have worked as university lecturers and researchers. So Mr. Friend might have been expected to head for a university after graduating from high school in Bryan, Texas, five years ago. Instead, he attended Texas State Technical College in Waco, and received a two-year degree in welding. In 2013, his first full year as a welder, his income was about $130,000, more than triple the average annual wages for welders in the U.S. In 2014, Mr. Friend’s income rose to about $140,000.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  infrastructure  economic-benefits  president-obama 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 7, 2015

The White House’s newly issued Statement of Administration Policy, announcing that President Obama would veto current, bipartisan congressional legislation to authorize construction of the Keystone XL pipeline does a couple of things.

First, it announces that the new era of cooperation between the president and the new Congress on issues that have consensus support – supposedly the mandate from voters in last fall’s elections – might be over before it starts.

Second, and no less serious, it shows that President Obama doesn’t listen – doesn’t listen to the American people, who broadly support the multi-billion-dollar, privately financed infrastructure that the president’s own State Department says would support more than 42,000 U.S. jobs during construction, generate $2 billion in workers’ earnings and add $3.4 billion to the economy.

Wrangling inside the Beltway isn’t new; Americans are used to that. But a president who stubbornly dismisses broad public opinion, as Mr. Obama is doing on Keystone XL, is concerning on a different level.

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energy-policy  energy-101  trade  economy  imports  lng-exports  keystone-xl-pipeline  soae 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 7, 2015

Wall Street Journal: The U.S. trade gap narrowed in November to its lowest level in nearly a year, reflecting gyrations in the oil market that mask strong underlying domestic demand for foreign goods. The trade deficit fell 7.7% to a seasonally adjusted $39 billion in November from the prior month’s deficit of $42.25 billion, the Commerce Department said Wednesday. The reading marks the smallest deficit since December 2013. October’s deficit was revised from an initially reported $43.43 billion. The narrower trade gap could support fourth-quarter economic growth. Barclays lifted it forecast fourth-quarter gross domestic product forecast to a 3.5% gain from a 2.7% advance following the trade report. Credit Suisse moved its estimate to a 3.2% advance from 2.9%.

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fracking  heating-oil  jobs  manufacturing  keystone-xl-pipeline  american-energy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 6, 2015

Cleveland.com: Cold January weather has arrived, but rates for natural gas have fallen. Both Dominion East Ohio and Columbia Gas of Ohio are posting standard rates that are lower than those in December and lower than year-ago January prices. These standard rates change monthly because they are linked to the monthly gas commodity contracts traded on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

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