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Energy Tomorrow Blog

rhode-island  vote4energy  natural-gas  infrastructure  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 19, 2016

Without any oil or natural gas of its own, Rhode Island ranks 49th among the 50 states in energy production. Thus, virtually all of the energy Rhode Island uses must come from somewhere else. In 2015, 95.2 percent of Rhode Island’s net generation of electricity was fueled by natural gas, which makes sufficient infrastructure – pipelines and gas-fired power plants – an imperative. 

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iowa  vote4energy  oil-and-natural-gas  ethanol  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 18, 2016

Given the fact Iowa leads the U.S. in corn production (18.4 percent of the national total last year), it follows that the state would also lead the country in biofuel production. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Iowa is the country’s largest ethanol producer, supplying 27.3 percent of U.S. fuel ethanol operating capacity in 2015. Iowa also is a big wind state, ranking second among the 50 states in net electricity generation from wind last year. Yet, at the same time, EIA says fossil fuels supplied more than 70 percent of the energy Iowans used in 2014, further illustrating the all-of-the-above nature of energy at state and local levels.

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georgia  vote4energy  natural-gas  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 17, 2016

Georgia is another good example of an all-of-the-above energy state. As an energy producer, Georgia has more nuclear electric power than any other energy source. At the same time, natural gas is the state’s leading fuel for generating electricity, accounting for 40.2 percent of its net generation in 2015. As a heavily forested state, Georgia produces large volumes of feedstock for biomass electricity generation, ranking third in net electricity from biomass in 2014. It truly takes an all-of-the-above energy approach – including oil and natural gas, nuclear, renewables – to energize a state and a country.

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delaware  vote4energy  refineries  infrastructure  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 16, 2016

The fact that Delaware has no oil or natural gas production doesn’t diminish the important part the state plays in America’s overall energy sector. Delaware is home to the Delaware City coking refinery, one of two coking refineries on the East Coast. These supply petroleum coke for the electric power and industrial sectors and makes up about a fifth of the nation’s finished petroleum product exports, according to U.S. Energy Information Administration data. In addition to that energy infrastructure, the state’s Delaware River ports and rail network make it critically important to the shipment of crude oil for refining in the state and neighboring states.

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florida  vote4energy  offshore-access  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 15, 2016

Florida is a tale of two energy stories. On the consumption side, only Texas generates more net electricity from natural gas than Florida – which makes sense given Florida’s use of electricity to run air conditioners during the summer and home heating units during the winter. Production-wise, Florida is in the second tier of states in output (about 2 million barrels of oil in 2015, compared to Texas’ 1.26 billion barrels) – yet geologists believe there may be large oil and natural gas reserves on the outer continental shelf off Florida’s western coast.

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vote4energy  maine  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 12, 2016

Woods. Maine has lots of woods. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, nearly 90 percent of the state is forested. Hence the nickname: the Pine Tree State. Naturally, wood products factor heavily in Maine’s energy portfolio, with biomass supplying the largest share of the energy Maine uses annually (27.3 percent in 2014).  

Yet, Maine is an all-of-the-above energy state – even with all those trees. Fuels from petroleum and natural gas are the next three largest energy sources, accounting for 52.8 percent of Maine’s energy use.

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vote4energy  arizona  nuclear  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 11, 2016

You might not think of Arizona as an energy state and to be sure, it ranks in the 30s in both oil and natural gas production. Arizona’s per capita energy consumption ranks 45th out of the 50 states. Yet, the state’s Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station is the largest nuclear power plant in the country, and the state ranked second in the country in utility-scale electricity generation from solar energy.

But Arizona’s energy ties go deeper. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, fuels from petroleum – natural gas, gasoline, fuel oil and others – supplied about 58 percent of the energy Arizonans used in 2014.

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vote4energy  south-carolina  oil-and-natural-gas  offshore-development  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 10, 2016

Our blog series on the 50 states of energy continues today with South Carolina – another piece of the national energy equation whose sum is an American energy superpower, leading the world in oil and natural gas production.

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vote4energy  louisiana  energy-production  refineries  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 9, 2016

We kicked off our 50 states of energy blog post series on Monday with New Jersey. Over the next several weeks we’ll focus on the impacts of energy in each individual state – underscoring the reality that the United States as an energy superpower, leading the world in oil and natural gas production, is very much a sum of its energy parts. Today: Louisiana.

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new-jersey  refinieries  eia34  vote4energy  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 8, 2016

The United States is the world’s leading producer of oil and natural gas – a fact that reflects energy production in so many of the individual states. At the same time, as an energy nation every single state is involved in the broad, economically beneficial energy supply chain. Over the next few weeks we’ll take a look at the 50 states of energy, including their energy use profiles and specific energy issues in each state. Today we start with – New Jersey.

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