The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

energy-security  energy-101  jobs  american-energy  keystone-xl-pipeline  oil-sands  economy  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted September 19, 2014

An unhappy birthday: Six years ago the Keystone XL pipeline application was first submitted. Now, after six years and five State Department reviews concluding that Keystone XL is in the national interest, Americans continue to wait for the jobs, revenue and security this project would provide. Meanwhile, since the application was filed in 2008, more than 10,000 miles of oil and natural gas pipeline have been built in the U.S – all while the Obama administration continues to delay a Keystone XL decision. And America loses.

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american-energy  fracking  energy-security  jobs  global-markets 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted September 12, 2014

NY Post (Editorial): Despite the years of stalling from Gov. Cuomo and the state Legislature, fracking has still managed to deliver real dividends for New York. Thanks to fracking, the Buffalo Bills are staying put.

The two main reasons the NFL franchise won’t be moving are as follows:

First, Terry Pegula this week won the bidding for the team. Pegula owns professional hockey’s Buffalo Sabres — and thus was seen as the most committed of the bidders to keeping the Bills in their home of 55 years.

Second, the cash the self-made billionaire and his wife used to buy the team (and to invest in Buffalo) comes largely from the fortune he made in fracking.

He’s not the only one profiting. As The New York Times reported this week, the fracking revolution has set off a boom in nearby Ohio, with benefits rippling through the Buckeye State’s economy.

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economy  jobs  energy-security  american-energy  exports  fracking  marcellus  texas 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted September 9, 2014

Platts: US gasoline prices will fall 9-12 cents/gal and prices elsewhere in the world will fall 10-13 cents/gal if current US restrictions on oil exports are dropped next year, a leading Washington think-tank said Tuesday.

"The more the US exports crude oil, the greater decline in gasoline prices," the study from The Brookings Institution's Energy Security Initiative claimed. "As counterintuitive as it may seem, lifting the ban actually lowers gasoline prices by increasing the total amount of crude supply, albeit by only a modest amount."

Brookings' finding are nearly identical to those of a May study from energy consultancy IHS which concluded that free trade of crude would cause US gasoline prices to fall 8-12 cents/gal due to the close link between gasoline and world oil prices.

Like IHS, the Brookings study claimed the impact of crude exports on gasoline prices dulls over time, falling from a 9-12 cent/gal drop in 2015 to 0-10 cents/gal by 2025.

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fracking  economy  energy-security  american-energy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 28, 2014

Fuel Fix Blog: The Marcellus region is now the biggest natural gas shale play in the world, and there’s still about $90 billion to be made by tapping the area’s reserves, according to a study by energy analyst group Wood Mackenzie.

The Marcellus, which stretches from New York to West Virginia, produced about 15.6 billion cubic feet of natural gas per day in August, about 38 percent of total U.S. natural gas production for the month, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The agency doesn’t expect the boom to taper off anytime soon, and several of the biggest companies are cashing in.

Wood Mackenzie predicted that the top 20 operators in the Marcellus will earn nearly $86 billion over the life of the play after the costs of reaching the reserves. Among the 20 largest operators are Fort Worth-based Range Resources Corp., Pittsburgh’s EQT Corp., Houston’s Cabot Oil & Gas Corp. and Denver-based Antero Resources.

For comparison, Wood Mackenzie estimated that there’s about $118 billion to be made by extracting the resources in North Dakota’s Bakken region — but most production there is higher-priced oil compared to the natural gas dominant in the Marcellus.

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american-energy  energy-security  jobs  technology  innovation  emissions  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 18, 2014

Albuquerque Journal (Former Sen. Pete Domenici): America has been handed a great gift, the gift of technological breakthroughs like horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing for oils and natural gas.

This gift, if we handle it properly, has the potential not only to free our nation from being hostage to other nations, but to allow Europe and other regions to free themselves from the tyranny of dependence on Russian sources of oil and gas.

Think how much differently our allies in Europe would behave in this time of crisis if they had the infrastructure, and the access, to handle natural gas and oil from America, Canada and Mexico.

New Mexico has played an important, I would say critical, role in this potential geopolitical and economic revolution.

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energy-security  jobs  economy  keystone-xl-pipeline  oil-sands  fracking  north-dakota 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 15, 2014

Forbes: The U.S. arm of the Stockholm Environment Institute (SEI) has been making news this week with a ‘new’ report claiming the Obama Administration drastically underestimated carbon emissions of the proposed Keystone XL pipeline.  The report seeks to make the case as to why the final portion of the Keystone pipeline system should not be built.

As tantalizing as the report sounds, supporters of the pipeline have been quick to point out the report is actually a recycled 2013 SEI report which the State Department took into account, and largely dismissed.

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economy  energy-security  jobs  american-energy  fracking  ohio  pennsylvania 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 11, 2014

The Daily Signal: There’s been something of an energy boom taking place in the U.S. over the past few years, and it’s given the American economy a real boost. Now we just need the federal government to get out of the way and open opportunities to freely trade energy, and those benefits will grow substantially.

U.S. coal exports over the past six years are way up, in large part because of the administration’s effort to limit consumption domestically. Domestic production of oil and natural gas is rising fast as well, with producers seeking to export their products to foreign markets.

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energy-security  economy  jobs  american-energy  fracking  marcellus  lng-exports  colorado  texas 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 8, 2014

Penn Live (Brian Hollister): I was retired at age 49. After service in the military and a career as an Electronic Quality Engineer, I was pleased to be working independently at what I enjoy most, small construction projects. I was living comfortably while doing work for friends and community members.

But then came the economic collapse of 2008, and like so many Americans, my fortune - quite literally - changed. Overnight I lost much of what I'd saved for my future and I needed to return to work. It's a familiar story. After time away, the job market I found was quite different from the one I'd left behind.

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american-energy  trade  global-markets  exports  fracking  economy  energy-security 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 7, 2014

The Christian Science Monitor: WASHINGTON — An oil and gas boom helped drive the US trade deficit to a five-month low in June, according to federal data released Wednesday.

Increased domestic energy production means Americans are buying less foreign oil and gas, and selling more of it overseas. That has tamped down the trade deficit in recent years, helping along an economy that continues to recover from the Great Recession.

Some say the deficit could be slashed further if the US were to ease energy export restrictions put in place to protect US consumers from global energy shocks. But such a move would have impacts that go beyond the country’s balance of trade. Critics of oil and gas exports say they will raise energy prices at home, and increase the environmental impacts of extracting and burning fossil fuels.

Either way, a renaissance in oil and gas production is already changing the way officials, analysts, and economists look at the future of the US economy.

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economy  energy-security  jobs  american-energy  fracking  lng-exports  colorado 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 6, 2014

The Hill (Toby Mack): America , along with its oil and gas producers, energy supply chain companies, and millions of American workers, are quite literally "missing the boat" as a result of the federal government-imposed ban on crude oil exports, and severe limits on liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports. Eliminating these restrictions would set the stage for dramatically more rapid growth in energy production and for the supply chain businesses that support energy operations.

Applications to export as much as 25 billion cubic feet per day (bcf/d) equivalent of natural gas are stuck in the Department of Energy's limbo of lengthy review processes.  Recently released studies and analysis indicate that each additional 10 bcf/d of natural gas produced to meet export demand would create 110,000 new jobs and $20 billion annually of new business for the energy supply chain - construction contractors, equipment companies, materials suppliers and production service providers. And with other nations rushing to fill the void left by the absence of U.S. exports, this window of opportunity will close and the business lost if we don't accelerate processing of these applications.

On the crude oil front, research firm IHS Energy conservatively projects that enabling exports would cause U.S. production to increase by an average of 1.2 million barrels per day by 2016, which would result in an additional $86 billion of GDP per year. With models showing about half of production-related output being created by the energy supply chain, this yields approximately $40 billion more per year in potential business for supply chain companies, with about another 200,000 new jobs.

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