The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

analysis  new-hampshire  crude-oil-exports  economy-and-energy  income  lng34  pricewaterhousecoopers  revenue  trade  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 21, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with New Hampshire. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and reviewed Hawaii, Idaho , Vermont and Oklahoma to begin this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with New Hampshire, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  access  offshore-energy  offshore-leases  gulf-of-mexico  boem 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 20, 2015

Some observations on this week’s federal oil and natural gas lease sale in the Western Gulf of Mexico, reported with alarm by some media outlets because it wasn’t as large as other recent sales.

First, every lease sale is welcome. Access to U.S. offshore reserves represents opportunity for energy development, job creation, economic growth and greater American energy security. We need more offshore opportunities to support the strategic, long-term energy security of the United States – advanced by a robust offshore energy sector.

This week the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) announced five companies submitted 33 bids on 33 tracts in the Western Gulf, with high bids totaling about $22.7 million.

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analysis  oklahoma  biofuels  e1534  energy  ethanol  gasoline-prices  pricewaterhousecoopers  renewable-fuel-standard  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 20, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Oklahoma. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and reviewed Hawaii, Idaho and Vermont this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Oklahoma, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  renewable-fuel-standard  rfs34  biofuels  ethanol  co234 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 19, 2015

There’s more scholarly research challenging the oft-heard claim that the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) and its requirements for increasing use of biofuels is good for the environment and climate.

The claimed environmental benefits of the RFS have been questioned before by organizations including the Environmental Working Group and ActionAid, as well as University of Minnesota researchers.

Now a paper published this month by University of Michigan Energy Institute researchers argues that the government-sponsored model used to calculate biofuels’ carbon footprint is flawed. The paper says a more accurate accounting method shows that corn ethanol doesn’t have an edge over petroleum gasoline when it comes to reducing CO2 emissions.

Research by the institute’s John DeCicco and Rashmi Krishnan (sponsored by API) found that assumed biofuel carbon neutrality that’s built into the government-sponsored model “does not hold up for real-world biofuel production.”

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analysis  vermont  crude-oil-exports  gasoline-prices  income  pricewaterhousecoopers  revenues  trade  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 19, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Vermont. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and reviewed Hawaii and Idaho to begin this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Vermont, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  methane  epa34  regulation  natural-gas-production  ozone  renewable-fuel-standard  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 18, 2015

So, the EPA looked at declining methane emissions …

Down 79 percent from hydraulically fractured wells since 2005; down 38 percent from natural gas production overall from 2005 to 2013; and emissions down – while natural gas production soared ... 

... and decided new methane regulations were the thing to do anyway.

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analysis  idaho  income  e1534  economy-and-energy  ethanol  gasoline-prices  renewable-fuel-standard  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 18, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Idaho. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and reviewed Hawaii to begin this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Idaho, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  mexico  crude-oil  energy-exports  trade  economic-benefits  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 17, 2015

Late last week the Obama administration gave the go-ahead for limited domestic crude oil exports to Mexico, a positive move on oil exports – yet one that immediately underscores this question: Why stop there?

According to the Associated Press, license applications approved by the Commerce Department allow the exchange of similar amounts of U.S. and Mexican crude, a swap. The U.S. would send an as-yet unspecified amount of light crude to Mexico in exchange for heavier Mexican crude. AP:

While the Commerce Department simultaneously rejected other applications for crude exports that violated the ban, the move to allow trading with Mexico marked a significant shift and an additional sign that the Obama administration may be open to loosening the export ban. Exchanges of oil are one of a handful of exemptions permitted under the export ban put in place by Congress.

Two things: First, the arrangement with Mexico, while limited in scope, nonetheless is the administration affirming the inherent benefits of trade. The light crude in the deal represents some of the domestic oil that’s accumulating and trading at a discount to global prices, unable to reach the world market because it’s shut in by an outdated, anti-competitive oil exports ban. Second, the U.S. needs to go further.

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analysis  hawaii  energy  income  offshore-access  oil-and-natural-gas-development  pricewaterhousecoopers  royalties  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 17, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Hawaii. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and continued with Montana, Iowa,  Alabama, Arizona and Nebraska last  week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Hawaii, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  energy-exports  crude-oil  economic-growth  domestic-oil-production  gasoline-prices  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 14, 2015

We’ve put up a number of posts recently that argue for lifting the United States’ decades-old ban on exporting domestic crude oil – citing sound economic, trade and security reasons. Underlying them all is this: As an energy superpower, America will see more benefits here at home, be more secure and help make the world safer if U.S. crude is allowed to trade freely in the global marketplace.

Now, there is a compelling, market reason for urgency in ending the export ban – a self-sanctioning relic of the 1970s that hinders U.S. global competitiveness while impeding domestic energy development and economic growth. That would be the impacts on global crude markets if/when Iran resumes exporting oil under the proposed nuclear agreement the White House is advancing.

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