The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

trade  american-energy  fracking  exports  pipelines  small-business 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 6, 2015

Wall Street Journal: The U.S. oil boom is redrawing America’s trade picture. Petroleum imports accounted for less than 20% of the nation’s trade deficit last year, down from more than 40% only five years earlier, according to figures for 2014 released Thursday. But the overall U.S. appetite for overseas goods didn’t diminish over the period, which started with the global economy’s first full year of expansion after the 2007-09 recession. Imports of just about everything else have surged as Americans substitute other goods for foreign oil, leaving a growing trade deficit. “If we hadn’t had this oil boom I think our deficit would be lot larger than it is right now,” said IHS Global Insight economist Patrick Newport. “It’s a game-changer.”

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american-energy  policy  biofuels  ethanol  rfs34  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 5, 2015

Denver Post Editorial: Yet another major environmental organization has concluded that biofuels, including ethanol, are a net detriment to the world — both in environmental and economic terms. The World Resources Institute (WRI) "recommends against dedicating land to produce bioenergy. The lesson: do not grow food or grass crops for ethanol or diesel or cut down trees for electricity." Why? The group, based in Washington, D.C., says converting plants into fuel is a terribly inefficient use of land, can never produce a major portion of the world's supplies, and puts pressure on cropland that is needed to feed the world's growing population, among other things.

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american-energy  economy  jobs  trade  manufacturing  exports  policy  ethanol  rfs34  keystone-xl-pipeline  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 3, 2015

NPR: As the economy continues to recover, economists are seeing stark differences between people with high school and college degrees. Four-year college graduates are nearly twice as likely to have a job compared to Americans who just graduated high school and stopped there. But economists say that doesn't mean everybody needs a four-year degree. In fact, millions of good-paying jobs are opening up in the trades. And some pay better than what the average college graduate makes.

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american-energy  infrastructure  innovation  fracking  economy  revenue  keystone-xl 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 2, 2015

Philadelphia Inquirer (Kevin Colosimo): Gov. Wolf has fulfilled a campaign promise to ban natural-gas drilling on state parklands, but he should ignore suggestions that he go further by instituting a statewide fracking ban. Simply put, a ban would kill the goose that has delivered a lot of golden eggs to the commonwealth. Consider: The natural-gas industry has contributed $34.7 billion to our economy, accounting for 5.8 percent of Pennsylvania's economic activity, according to an American Petroleum Institute study. The same study determined that the oil and natural-gas industry supports 339,000 jobs, or roughly 4.7 percent of the state's total employment. Shale development has generated more than $2 billion in state taxes, according to the state Department of Revenue.

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american-energy  energy-policy  lng-exports  ozone  epa34  emssions  fracking  ethanol 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 30, 2015

Support for LNG exports has gained momentum on Capitol Hill, with both the House and Senate advancing legislation this week that would help expedite federal approvals for exporting our plentiful natural gas. In a Senate Energy Committee hearing yesterday, an Energy Department official told lawmakers the legislation “is a solution [the agency] will be able to comply with.” Good news as both sides of the aisle tackle vital energy issues in the 114th Congress.

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keystone-xl  emissions  lng-exports  economy  jobs  arctic  alaska  policy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 29, 2015

National Journal: Over the past six years, the Keystone XL oil-sands pipeline has become a powerful symbol in the midst of a national debate over energy security and climate change. Opponents warn that construction would speed Canadian oil-sands development, which could spell "game over" for the planet. But despite its iconic status, Keystone would generate far fewer emissions than the nation's fleet of power plants, a source of emissions that the president has pledged to crack down on as part of his climate agenda.

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american-energy  economy  energy-security  growth  ethanol  fracking  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 28, 2015

The Guardian (Debbie Carlson): Ethanol was supposed to do a lot for the US. It was supposed to help reduce our dependence on foreign oil. It was supposed to combat climate change. It was supposed to be a gateway for more renewable fuels technology. It was supposed to reduce gasoline prices because it was cheaper. So when Congress mandated in 2005 that 10% of the nation’s fuel supply had to be blended with ethanol, which is derived from corn, there were some idealistic hopes that renewable fuels would wean us off fossil fuels. It hasn’t worked that way.

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american-energy  economy  jobs  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline  energy-security  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 27, 2015

TribLIVE: Specialized, experienced engineers are becoming a tough get in Western Pennsylvania as the gas drilling industry outpaces the growth of an experienced talent pool. Stock awards, sign-on bonuses, unlimited vacation and travel stipends are increasingly becoming necessary for companies looking to attract top candidates, recruiters say. “Sometimes, we get so lost in it, they have so much they're trying to offer and entice them with,” said Frank Civitate, founder and president of Synergy Staffing, based in Pittsburgh. “The fact of the matter is everyone is looking for the same types of folks.”

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economy  global-markets  energy-security  fracking  alaska  anwr  revenue 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 26, 2015

The New York Times (Daniel Yergin): A historic change of roles is at the heart of the clamor and turmoil over the collapse of oil prices, which have plummeted by 50 percent since September. For decades, Saudi Arabia, backed by the Persian Gulf emirates, was described as the “swing producer.” With its immense production capacity, it could raise or lower its output to help the global market adjust to shortages or surpluses. But on Nov. 27, at the OPEC meeting in Vienna, Saudi Arabia effectively resigned from that role and OPEC handed over all responsibility for oil prices to the market, which the Saudi oil minister, Ali Al-Naimi, predicted would “stabilize itself eventually.” OPEC’s decision was hardly unanimous. Venezuela and Iran, their economies in deep trouble, lobbied hard for production cutbacks, to no avail. Afterward, Iran accused Saudi Arabia of waging an “oil war” and being part of a “plot” against it.

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energy-security  economy  jobs  policies  keystone-xl  alaska  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 23, 2015

Forbes (Loren Steffy): President Obama didn’t say much about energy in his State of the Union speech Tuesday. Last year, he focused on energy issues more, and devoted much of the energy portions of his speech to natural gas.

This year, he acknowledged rising U.S. oil production and the benefits of cheap energy that have come with it, and then he made a backhanded reference to the Keystone XL pipeline.

In calling on both parties to support the infrastructure projects such as “modern ports, strong bridges, faster trains and faster internet,” he then encouraged lawmakers to pass a bipartisan infrastructure plan by saying: “So let’s set our sights higher than a single oil pipeline.”

Certainly, the Keystone pipeline has become a far greater political punching bag than a meaningful piece of infrastructure. Environmentalists have greatly exaggerated its role in climate change, and Republicans in Congress are now determined to push through legislation supporting it almost out of spite for the administration’s foot-dragging on a decision.

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