The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

keystone-xl  oil-sands  economic-growth  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 3, 2014

The Keystone XL pipeline now is in the “national interest determination” phase of a long process to gain federal approval for construction. Having cleared its fifth State Department environmental review, the project is to be judged by on whether its construction serves the U.S. national interest. Last week’s State Department report listed the key factors that go into that determination:

To make this decision (i.e., the National Interest Determination), the Secretary of State, through the Department, considers many factors, including energy security; environmental, cultural, and economic impacts; foreign policy; and compliance with relevant state and federal regulations.

Let’s examine some of these. First, energy security: Would construction of the full Keystone XL pipeline further the energy security of the United States?

Yes.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  oil-sands  canadian-oil-sands  job-creation  oil-and-natural-gas-production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 27, 2013

The long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline and whether President Obama will agree with a strong majority of Americans who believe that the full project is in the U.S. national interest landed on a couple of year-ending lists of top energy issues, here andhere, no doubt reflecting the politics surrounding the pipeline’s five-year federal review.

Much of politicizing has been fueled by opponents who say stopping Keystone XL will stop oil sands development. The U.S. State Department disagreed in its most recent review, citing key economic factors that argue oil sands will get to market with or without the Keystone XL. The dynamic already is at work.

Last week, Canada’s National Energy Board recommended approval of the Northern Gateway pipeline to bring as much as 525,000 barrels a day of oil sands from Alberta to British Columbia. At the same time others are making plans to build loading terminals to service oil sands-bearing railroad cars. Demand for supply is driving the infrastructure needed to deliver that supply.

The question for the U.S. concerns the impact of Washington’s never-ending deliberation over the Keystone XL, even as other infrastructure for delivering oil sands moves toward reality.

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energy-security  keystone-xl-pipeline  infrastructure  oil-sands  canada 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 12, 2013

U.S. voters continue to support approval of the full Keystone XL pipeline by strong, bipartisan majorities. A new Harris Interactive survey of 1,025 registered voters found that 72 percent agree it is in the United States’ national interest to approve the Keystone XL so it can deliver North American oil to U.S. refineries. In poll after poll, Americans have said: Build the Keystone XL.

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gulf-coast  keystone-xl-pipeline  job-creation  oil-sands  canada 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 10, 2013

Saw the tweet from energy author/scholar Daniel Yergin on the startup of TransCanada’s Gulf Coast Pipeline, linking the crude oil hub in Cushing, Okla., with refineries along the Texas Gulf Coast.

Certainly, the shot of President Obama standing in front of stacks of steel pipe last year is a reminder that he went to Oklahoma to illustrate his administration’s support for the 485-mile project.

Yet, commercial startup of the project also reminds that the Gulf Coast Pipeline is part of the larger Keystone XL project, which would allow more Canadian oil sands to be delivered to U.S. refiners. The Keystone XL’s northern portion remains on the drawing board and workers idle on the sidelines after more than five years of federal review.

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ethanol  renewable-fuel-standard  epa-proposal  oil-sands  shale-drilling 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 18, 2013

Big Ethanol Finally Loses

Wall Street Journal (editorial): It's not often that the ethanol lobby suffers a policy setback in Washington, but it got its head handed to it Friday. The Environmental Protection Agency announced that for the first time it is lowering the federal mandate that dictates how much ethanol must be blended into the nation's gasoline. It's about time. It's been about time from the moment the ethanol mandate came to life in the 1970s.

The 16% reduction is a modest pullback, which EPA says will hold ethanol blends in gasoline at the standard 10% (E10). But we hope this is a precedent-setting victory. After 35 years of exaggerations about the benefits of renewable fuels, the industry has lost credibility.

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renewable-fuel-standard  blend-wall  emissions  liquid-natural-gas  oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 1, 2013

Lawmakers Urge EPA to Change Fuel Mandate

The Hill: More than 100 lawmakers are calling on Environmental Protection Agency chief Gina McCarthy to reduce the amount of ethanol that oil refiners must blend into gasoline next year.

Signed by 169 House members, the letter sent to McCarthy on Thursday urged the EPA to lower the renewable fuel standard (RFS), arguing the current mandate is unrealistic.

"Whether it’s increasing amounts of ethanol in fuel or higher food and feed prices, the RFS continues to negatively impact American consumers and the economy," Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) said in a statement. 



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energy-security  jobs  keystone-xl  oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 16, 2013

Let’s see: Five years is 1,825 days, which is a pretty long time. Long enough to build the Hoover Dam, and long enough for Michelangelo to paint the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. It’s long enough for Lewis & Clark to explore the American West and for the U.S. and its allies to win World War II.

But it’s not long enough for the Obama administration to approve construction of the full Keystone XL pipeline – and in the process side with 82 percent of Americans who want it built and clear the way for thousands of new U.S. jobs and greater U.S. energy security. Not long enough.

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oil-sands  rfs34  ethanol  emissions 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 13, 2013

Bloomberg News– Canada's Oil Sands Industry Using CO2 to Grow Algae, Reduce Emissions

In an effort to  curb carbon emissions, Canadian energy companies have started converting CO2 into products – taking carbon dioxide from processing oil sands, mixing it with wastewater and fed to algae, which then can be turned into cattle feed and other products.

Washington Times – China Will Surpass U.S. in Oil Imports

According to EIA data, China will take over the top spot from the U.S. as the world’s largest importer of crude oil by October, the newspaper reports. This shift in the global oil market – the first time the U.S. will not be the top importer or oil since the 1970s – “could transform geopolitics” as the U.S. shale surge continues.  

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climate-impact  keystone-xl  emissions  oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 9, 2013

IHS CERA’s new environmental assessment of the Keystone XL pipeline and pipeline-related oil sands development sends a pretty clear message to President Obama as he decides whether to approve the full project’s construction: There’s not a climate rationale for rejecting the pipeline – and along with it, tens of thousands of U.S. jobseconomic uplift and greater energy security.

While the IHS report no doubt will have little effect on pipeline opponents – less than 15 percent of Americans in this recent survey – it should get the attention of the president, who has said the Keystone XL should be built only if it would serve the national interest and not “significantly exacerbate the problem of carbon pollution.”

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emissions  hydraulic-fracturing  keystone-xl-pipeline  oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 9, 2013

Reuters – Study: Keystone XL to Have ‘No Material Impact’ on Emissions

The new study by IHS CERA backs an earlier U.S. State Department analysis that the pipeline and pipeline-related oil sands development wouldn’t significantly affect U.S. greenhouse gas emissions.

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