The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

fracking  american-energy  economy  environment  energy-security  energy-efficiency  jobs  hydraulic-fracturing  innovation  technology 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 17, 2014

Happy birthday, fracking! What a fantastic, 65-year ride it has been – and here’s to another 65 years and more.

Advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling launched an oil and natural gas renaissance in this country – bringing dynamic job creation, economic stimulus that radiates well beyond the oil and natural gas industry proper and greater energy security. Thanks to fracking, the United States is an energy superpower that, with the right policies, can harness its vast resources to ensure a significantly better future for its citizens while reducing energy-related tension across the globe.

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innovation  manufacturing  jobs  economy  fracking  american-energy  global-energy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 25, 2014

American Shale Gas and Tight Oil: Reshaping the Global Energy Balance

IHS Unconventional Energy Blog: The development of shale gas and tight oil in the United States constitutes an “unconventional revolution,” owing to its scale and speed. It is already having a profound global impact: upending energy markets, reshaping competitiveness in the world economy, and portending major shifts in global politics.

The unconventional revolution was born out of advances in two technologies. Hydraulic fracturing — or “fracking” — was introduced at the end of the 1940s. Efforts to apply this technique to dense shale in Texas began in the early 1980s. But it took two decades to perfect the combination of fracking and horizontal drilling that would drive the new boom. And it wasn’t until 2008 that these techniques began to have a major impact.

Since then, however, growth has been remarkable. Shale gas currently accounts for nearly half of U.S. natural gas production, and U.S. prices have fallen to one third of European levels and one-fifth of Asian levels. Tight oil, produced with the same techniques as shale gas, has led to a 60 percent rise in U.S. oil production since 2008. This increase of three million barrels per day is larger than the national output of nine of the 13 OPEC countries. The International Energy Agency predicts that the U.S. will soon overtake Saudi Arabia and Russia as the world’s largest oil producer.

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alternative-energy  global-energy  fracking  innovation  technology  keystone-xl-pipeline  jobs  economy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 10, 2014

How the U.S. Energy Boom is Changing America’s Place in the World 

Time: It wasn’t even five years ago that Iran reelected hardliner Mahmoud Ahmadinejad in a disputed presidential election, openly admitted it was building a uranium enrichment facility and brazenly test-fired missiles capable of hitting targets in Israel. Fast-forward to today: A more conciliatory president, Hassan Rouhani, is making historic overtures toward the West and negotiations are showing rare progress toward containing the country’s nuclear program, which has kept the region—and the world—on edge for years.

The difference, according to former Obama administration National Security Advisor Tom Donilon, can be summed up in one word: “fracking.” That’s hydraulic fracturing, the drilling method that’s helped fuel an unprecedented domestic energy boom in the United States.

“There’s a direct line between the U.S.-led sanctions effort to put pressure on Iran” and the flood of oil and gas coming out of the ground at home due to fracking technology, Donilon said Thursday night at an event announcing a new report from the Center for a New American Security, titled “Energy Rush: Shale Production and U.S. National Security.”

Before the North American energy boom—the largest-ever annual increase in domestic oil production took place in 2012—a harsh sanctions regime against Iran looked more like a suicide pact for the oil-import-dependent U.S. Instead, America’s sudden energy abundance dampened the blow of reduced oil exports to the global economy, making truly harsh sanctions on Iran possible.

Read more: http://ti.me/1eKvYKd 

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american-energy  environment  energy-security  jobs  keystone-xl-pipeline  infrastructure  fracking  innovation 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 4, 2014

Free the Keystone XL Pipeline, Mr. President

Los Angeles Times: Welcome to the "year of action." In last week's State of the Union address, the president vowed to do whatever he has to help the economy, even if that means working around Congress: "What I offer tonight is a set of concrete, practical proposals to speed up growth, strengthen the middle class and build new ladders of opportunity into the middle class. Some require congressional action, and I'm eager to work with all of you. But America does not stand still, and neither will I. So wherever and whenever I can take steps without legislation to expand opportunity for more American families, that's what I'm going to do."

The White House has touted the fact the president has a "phone and a pen" and he's not afraid to use them.

The president also vowed to cut red tape, and not for the first time. In 2013's State of the Union, he insisted that "my administration will keep cutting red tape and speeding up new oil and gas permits." And in 2012: "In the next few weeks, I will sign an executive order clearing away the red tape that slows down too many construction projects."

 

Read more: http://lat.ms/1eRaGFu

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american-energy  energyworks  jobs  economy  innovation  infrastructure 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 16, 2014

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Institute for 21st Century Energy laid out a road map for energy policy yesterday. Energy Works for US focuses on nine energy areas including removing barriers to increased domestic oil and natural gas production, modernizing the federal permitting process, regulation reform, and ensuring a competitive workforce.

Chamber CEO Tom Donohue spoke on America’s energy renaissance and opportunities for the future:

“Energy is absolutely essential. We have an opportunity to transform our country from one that is dependent on imports to an energy exporter. The U.S. has such energy reserves; we shouldn’t be reliant on foreign sources.” 

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fracking  innovation  jobs  economy  american-energy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 15, 2014

America’s Energy Boom     

Real Clear Politics:  WASHINGTON -- For decades, Americans have talked about "energy policy" as if it were the political equivalent of a migraine. The phrase connoted pain -- in ever-rising gas prices, costly government schemes and dependence on imports from precarious Middle East regimes.

But recent developments involving energy production and technology have been so astonishing that they should puncture this long-running pessimism. The amazing fact is that on nearly every front, America's energy prospects have improved in ways that would have been unimaginable just a decade ago.

In the energy marketplace, President Obama's vision of an "all of the above" strategy is actually happening. Production of oil, gas and alternative energy is rising, even as demand begins falling for these energy sources -- all thanks to new technology. The market forces driving these changes are so powerful that even politicians probably can't screw them up.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1b47dCg

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energy-policy  fracking  innovation  technology  renewable-fuel-standard 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 6, 2014

Fracking 101: Breaking Down the most Important Part of Today’s Oil, Gas Drilling

Greeley Tribune:  Fracking, the two- to three-day process of hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas, is perhaps one of the most misunderstood drilling practices, becoming as bad of a word in some circles as a racial slur.

 

Entire countries have banned the process. Some Colorado towns have placed moratoriums to study it further.

Environmentalists storm capitals over it, demanding increased regulations, and oil and gas company employees and officials scratch their heads — they’ve been using the same process in oil and gas drilling for 60 years without widespread incidents.

 

“It’s a perplexing issue,” said Collin Richardson, vice president of operations for Mineral Resources Inc., who opened up a company fracking job last fall to a student tour from the University of Northern Colorado. “People go to a light switch and expect energy to be there, but they don’t think about where it comes from. I don’t think most people understand that without hydraulic fracturing, we wouldn’t have natural gas to provide electricity to our homes or gas in our cars.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1gc41Z7

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innovation  jobs  manufacturing  american-energy  keystone-xl  groundwater-protection 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 7, 2013

CLEVELAND -- U.S. Steel Corp. is expanding its Lorain steel tube plant to make pipes for natural gas companies.


Read more: http://on.wkyc.com/1b6PXyW

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innovation  technology  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  hydrofracking 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 7, 2013

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) chief Adam Sieminski recently gave a presentation at Columbia University on the agency’s new drilling productivity report, and the takeaways are significant: The U.S. is in the midst of a remarkable surge in oil and natural gas production from shale and other tight resources. Higher drilling efficiency and new well productivity are the main drivers of production growth. EIA is confident the United States has ample reserves to sustain production growth for the foreseeable future. Sieminski said U.S. shale reserves, unlocked by hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, are the reason for skyrocketing oil and natural gas production – since 2007 for natural gas, 2009 for oil.

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american-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  innovation  technology  keystone-xl  ethanol  biofuels 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 4, 2013

The Outsiders Who Saw Our Economic Future

Wall Street Journal: The experts keep getting it wrong. And the oddballs keep getting it right.

Over the past five years of business history, two events have shocked and transformed the nation. In 2007 and 2008, the housing market crumbled and the financial system collapsed, causing trillions of dollars of losses. Around the same time, a few little-known wildcatters began pumping meaningful amounts of oil and gas from U.S. shale formations. A country that once was running out of energy now is on track to become the world's leading producer.

What's most surprising about both events is how few experts saw them coming—and that a group of unlikely outsiders somehow did. Federal Reserve chairmen Alan Greenspan and Ben Bernanke failed to foresee the financial meltdown. Top banking executives were stunned, and leading investors such as Bill Gross, Jim Chanos and George Soros didn't fully anticipate the downturn.

 

Read more: http://on.wsj.com/172n4PZ

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