The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

analysis  ozone  colorado  economic-impacts  epa34  regulation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 1, 2015

Surely, more state governors soon will echo the concern of Colorado’s John Hickenlooper for the potential economic impacts on his state of stricter ozone standards proposed by EPA. That is, any governor concerned about what it could mean for growth and progress if large chunks of his or her state were declared out of compliance.

In Colorado, that could be more than $19 billion in gross state product losses from 2017 to 2040 and nearly 11,000 lost jobs or job equivalents, according to a study by NERA Economic Consulting.

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analysis  georgia  biofuels  economy-and-energy  epa34  greenhouse-gas-emission-reduction  income  ozone-regulations  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 27, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Georgia. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and began this week with a review of Kentucky, Tennessee and Utah. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Georgia, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  oil-and-natural-gas-development  access  president-obama  epa34  regulation  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 25, 2015

Earlier this year at the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) annual conference in Washington, ClearView  Energy Partners’ Christine Tezak described the Obama administration’s energy policy as “give a little, take a little,” further characterizing it as “transitioning from scarcity to adequacy.”

It’s accurate. Handed a generational opportunity by America’s energy revolution to advance U.S. economic and security interests, the administration has responded by alternately embracing oil and natural gas development (in limited ways) and working to corral it. Given the chance to build a comprehensive, long-term energy strategy to carry the United States safely into mid-century, the administration has played “small ball” on the energy development side while unleashing a flood of unnecessary, self-limiting proposals largely untethered to scientific and economic analysis.

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analysis  tennessee  epa34  greenhouse-gas-emission-reduction  income  ozone-regulations  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 25, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Tennessee. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and began this week with a review of Kentucky. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Tennessee, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  energy-exports  crude-oil  regulation  methane  epa34  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 24, 2015

Two items from the weekend help sharpen the focus a strategic choice before Americans as they look to the future: Which energy path will we take?

One path leads to increased domestic energy development. It’s typified by safe and responsible oil and natural gas production that harnesses America’s energy wealth to create jobs, grow the economy and make the U.S. more secure in the world.

Another path likely would lead to very little of the above. It’s characterized by unnecessary regulation and self-limiting policies that hinder or block domestic development. America would be less secure, economically and in the world, and our allies, too.

The two paths, two very different futures – for American energy and America.

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analysis  methane  epa34  regulation  natural-gas-production  ozone  renewable-fuel-standard  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 18, 2015

So, the EPA looked at declining methane emissions …

Down 79 percent from hydraulically fractured wells since 2005; down 38 percent from natural gas production overall from 2005 to 2013; and emissions down – while natural gas production soared ... 

... and decided new methane regulations were the thing to do anyway.

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analysis  ozone  epa34  regulation  economic-impacts  oil-and-natural-gas-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 13, 2015

It’s expected that EPA will submit its recommendation for new ozone standards to the White House Office of Management and Budget next week, with the final rule due by Oct. 1.

The final outcome will be momentous. EPA could – and should – leave the existing standards in place at 75 parts per billion (ppb). That would be remarkable, given the long rulemaking process and the agency’s current inclination to regulate more, not less.

Conversely, reducing the standards to 65 ppb or possibly lower would make it the costliest regulation ever, with the potential to halt economic expansion and infrastructure development dead in their tracks. Stricter standards could result in a $270 billion reduction in GDP per year on average from 2017 through 2040 and an annual loss of 2.9 million job equivalents, according to a study by NERA Economic Consulting.

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analysis  arizona  biofuels  energy  epa34  greenhouse-gas-emission-reduction  ozone-regulations  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 13, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Arizona. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and reviewed Montana, Iowa and Alabama earlier this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Arizona, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  alabama  economy-and-energy  epa34  income  ozone-regulations  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 12, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Alabama. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and reviewed Montana and Iowa to begin this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Alabama, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  iowa  biofuels  e1534  epa34  ethanol  gasoline-costs  renewable-fuel-standard  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 11, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Iowa. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and reviewed Montana to begin this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Iowa, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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