The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

environment  economy  alternative-energy  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline  efficiency 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 18, 2014

U.S. Energy Secretary Says Fracking Brings Prosperity

Capital New York: ALBANY—U.S. energy secretary Ernest Moniz said Andrew Cuomo should consider the economic prosperity fracking has brought to Pennsylvania as he weighs a ban in New York.

Natural gas produced by fracking has boosted American industry by more than $100 billion and lowered CO2 emissions, Moniz said, in an interview with Capital.

“This new resource is of critical importance. If you look at Pennsylvania, it's amazing, in the Marcellus shale,” he said. “They have gone from a very, very minor contributor to the national natural gas production, to nearly 20 percent in a remarkably short period. And as we know, that has had enormous economic benefits for the state. Obviously, New York will presumably take that as one of the factors to be considered in its decision.”

Moniz acknowledged that high-volume hydraulic fracturing presents environmental challenges, but said it can also be done safely. Proper management of wells is important including minimizing water usage as well as recycling and the careful monitoring of surface water and flow back fluids.

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jobs  american-energy  economy  energy-security  environment  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 13, 2014

Fuel Fix Blog: While the January jobs report was a disappointing for the national economy, it brought good news about growth in oil and gas.

About 206,000 employees worked in the oil and gas extraction sector in January, about 1.8 percent more than in December, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Nationwide, total employment was relatively stagnant at a seasonally adjusted 137.5 million.

The employment story was positive across sectors of the energy industry. Manufacturing of petroleum and coal products had 112,700 employees on payrolls, a 1.6 percent increase from December. The chemicals sector grew by 1.2 percent to 796,100 people.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  american-energy  economy  jobs  energy-security  environment  oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 13, 2014

What They’ve Said About Keystone XL: Build It!

It’s hard to overstate the broad-based nature of political support for the Keystone XL pipeline, support that stems from the project’s benefits: upwards of 830,000 barrels a day of oil from Canada’s oil sands and the U.S. Bakken region, 42,100 jobsduring the pipeline’s construction phase, strengthened energy security – with the Keystone XL playing an integral role in a broad strategy that could see 100 percent of U.S. liquid fuel needs met domestically and from Canada.

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fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline  jobs  environment  energy-security  economy  infrastructure 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 5, 2014

Former Secretary Salazar Boosts Fracking, Keystone XL Pipeline 

Newsworthy today: Former U.S. Secretary of Interior Ken Salazar, speaking at the North American Prospect Expo in Houston, notes  that hydraulic fracturing is, in part, the reason America is enjoying an energy boom that is making the country more energy secure and energy self-sufficient. Salazar

“We know that, from everything we’ve seen, there’s not a single case where hydraulic fracking has created an environmental problem for anyone. We need to make sure that story is told.” 

Salazar also said the Keystone XL pipeline is a ‘win-win” for America: 

“At the end of the day, we are going to be consuming that oil. So is it better for us to get the oil from our good neighbor from the north, or to be bringing it from some place in the Middle East?”

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american-energy  environment  energy-security  jobs  keystone-xl-pipeline  infrastructure  fracking  innovation 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 4, 2014

Free the Keystone XL Pipeline, Mr. President

Los Angeles Times: Welcome to the "year of action." In last week's State of the Union address, the president vowed to do whatever he has to help the economy, even if that means working around Congress: "What I offer tonight is a set of concrete, practical proposals to speed up growth, strengthen the middle class and build new ladders of opportunity into the middle class. Some require congressional action, and I'm eager to work with all of you. But America does not stand still, and neither will I. So wherever and whenever I can take steps without legislation to expand opportunity for more American families, that's what I'm going to do."

The White House has touted the fact the president has a "phone and a pen" and he's not afraid to use them.

The president also vowed to cut red tape, and not for the first time. In 2013's State of the Union, he insisted that "my administration will keep cutting red tape and speeding up new oil and gas permits." And in 2012: "In the next few weeks, I will sign an executive order clearing away the red tape that slows down too many construction projects."

 

Read more: http://lat.ms/1eRaGFu

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keystone-xl-pipeline  environment  energy-security  jobs  manufacturing  ethanol  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 3, 2014

With last week’s release of the fifth positive environmental study of the pipeline by the State Department, much is being written about benefits that would follow the project’s approval – including jobs and economic stimulus – without significantly impacting the environment.

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american-energy  energy-policy  fracking  environment  economy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 17, 2014

David Ignatius has an important column in the Washington Post this week on America’s energy boom –the result of greatly expanded domestic oil and natural gas production and an “all of the above” approach to energy policy. Ignatius writes:

For decades, Americans have talked about “energy policy” as if it were the political equivalent of a migraine. The phrase connoted pain — in ever-rising gas prices, costly government schemes and dependence on imports from precarious Middle East regimes. But recent developments involving energy production and technology have been so astonishing that they should puncture this long-running pessimism. The amazing fact is that, on nearly every front, America’s energy prospects have improved in ways that would have been unimaginable just a decade ago. In the energy marketplace, President Obama’s vision of an “all of the above” strategy is actually happening. Production of oil, gas and alternative energy is rising, even as demand begins falling for these energy sources — all thanks to new technology. The market forces driving these changes are so powerful that even politicians probably can’t screw them up.

Ignatius highlights data we’ve previously seen from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), projecting that the U.S. will produce nearly 9.6 million barrels of oil per day by 2016, a level not seen since 1970 – thanks largely to vast shale deposits and advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling.

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american-energy  jobs  economy  environment  hydraulic-fracturing  taxes  tax-revenue 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 23, 2013

State Already Taxes Oil in many Ways

San Francisco Chronicle (Catherine Reheis-Boyd): Tom Steyer, the San Francisco billionaire environmentalist, has launched a campaign to increase taxes on energy production in California. He thinks oil companies are allowed to "siphon California resources without providing any meaningful return to Californians."

Beginning an education campaign on inaccurate claims doesn't bode well for the quality of the educational experience.

To claim Californians receive no meaningful return for the oil we produce is puzzling. Oil companies in California generate $6 billion in tax revenues for state and local governments, according to an analysis by Purvin & Gertz in 2011. While it's true California does not have an oil severance tax per se, California taxes oil companies and oil production in a variety of other ways.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1kzQ4aP

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american-energy  carbon-emissions  environment  pennsylvania  hydraulic-fracturing  new-york  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 17, 2013

U.S. Energy Outlook: More Oil, More Natural Gas, Less Carbon. Yay America!

Forbes: The federal government’s Energy Information Administration is out today with an early version of its Annual Energy Outlook for 2014. Their headline finding: that the United States will continue to grow less dependent on foreign oil as the miracle of our tight oil boom adds to supply and more efficient vehicles reduce demand. Yay America!

By their reckoning, domestic crude oil production will continue its surge, adding another 800,000 barrels per day in 2014 and about the same in 2015. By 2016 we should reach 9.5 million barrels per day, approaching the historical high of 9.6 million bpd back in 1970.

The boom won’t last forever, and will level off around 2020. But when domestic oil supplies do start slipping, we won’t feel it too much at first, because our vehicles will be using a lot less fuel.

Read more: http://onforb.es/1gEiWP8

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economy  environment  energy-security  jobs  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 12, 2013

Shale Gas a Boon to Public Health

Breaking Energy (Dana Bohan): You’ve probably heard that the United States is experiencing an unprecedented energy boom that is transforming our economy, enhancing our energy security, and creating a manufacturing renaissance — all thanks to hydraulic fracturing and the development of America’s massive oil and natural gas resources. But what you probably haven’t heard is that shale development has an added bonus: it is rapidly reducing emissions of all kinds, which translates to massive public health benefits.

A new report by University of California-Berkeley climate scientist Richard Muller puts the health benefits of natural gas in the spotlight, concluding that “air pollution can be mitigated by the development and utilization of shale gas,” and because of this, “environmentalists who oppose the development of shale gas and fracking are making a tragic mistake.”

Read more: http://bit.ly/1gt6PnI

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