The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

american-energy  imports  emissions  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 10, 2014

EIA Today in Energy: U.S. crude oil proved reserves rose for the fourth consecutive year in 2012, increasing by 15% to 33 billion barrels, according to the U.S. Crude Oil and Natural Gas Proved Reserves (2012) report released April 10 by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. U.S. crude oil and lease condensate proved reserves were the highest since 1976, and the 2012 increase of 4.5 billion barrels was the largest annual increase since 1970, when 10 billion barrels of Alaskan crude oil were added to U.S. proved reserves. Contributing factors to higher crude oil reserves include increased exploration for liquid hydrocarbons, improved technology for developing tight oil plays, and sustained high historical crude oil prices.

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renewable-fuel-standard  blend-wall  emissions  liquid-natural-gas  oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 1, 2013

Lawmakers Urge EPA to Change Fuel Mandate

The Hill: More than 100 lawmakers are calling on Environmental Protection Agency chief Gina McCarthy to reduce the amount of ethanol that oil refiners must blend into gasoline next year.

Signed by 169 House members, the letter sent to McCarthy on Thursday urged the EPA to lower the renewable fuel standard (RFS), arguing the current mandate is unrealistic.

"Whether it’s increasing amounts of ethanol in fuel or higher food and feed prices, the RFS continues to negatively impact American consumers and the economy," Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) said in a statement. 



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hydraulic-fracturing  environment  emissions  american-energy  jobs 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 24, 2013

U.S. Carbon Emissions Hit Lowest Level Since 1994

USA Today: In a bit of encouraging climate news, the U.S. government reported Monday that U.S. emissions of heat-trapping greenhouse gases from the burning of fossil fuels were lower last year than at any time since 1994.

Driven by efficiency gains, an unusually warm winter and a switch from coal to natural gas, energy-related carbon dioxide emissions actually declined 3.8% in 2012 even though the U.S. economy grew 2.8% that year, according to new data by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, the statistical arm of the Department of Energy.

This emissions decline was the largest in any year that had positive growth in per capita gross domestic product (GDP) — its economic output — and the only drop when GDP rose at least 2%.

Read more: http://ti.me/1eNNHNA

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environment  industry  environment-and-safety  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  emissions  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 2, 2013

California Can Protect the Environment While Sharing in a Financial Bonanza 

The Globe and Mail: Hydraulic fracturing — fracking — has been used to extract oil and natural gas from shale rock for decades. But technological improvements in recent years have made the process far more efficient. It’s expanded use in states like North Dakota, Texas, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Colorado has sparked an energy revolution that is pushing the United States toward energy independence. It has also sparked major controversy over environmental concerns, nowhere more so than in California. On Sept. 20, Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation regulating fracking. In this essay below, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, like Brown an environmentally oriented Democrat, makes the case that energy development and environmental protection are not mutually exclusive.


A 21st-century oil and natural gas industry in Colorado is recognizing that more rigorous regulations translate into broader citizen acceptance. This evolution, and the joining of innovations like horizontal drilling with long-accepted practices like hydraulic fracturing, is moving America toward energy independence.

 

In the process, we are improving the quality of the air, as well as beginning to fight back against climate change. Colorado has a proud history of leadership and innovation in the deployment of clean energy technologies. We have laws in place that require utilities to produce as much as 30 percent of their electricity from renewable sources by 2020.

 

Read more: http://bit.ly/GzZbrG

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energy-security  keystone-xl  emissions  canadian-oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 12, 2013

For Canada, the question of whether the Keystone XL pipeline should be built can be reduced to a handful of clarity producing contrasts – as Canadian Ambassador to the U.S. Gary Doer framed for a group of reporters this week:

Does the U.S. choose oil from Venezuela or neighbor and ally Canada?

Do we transport that oil by pipeline, in an environmentally safe and cost-effective manner, or by other means?

Do we choose infrastructure construction, meaning thousands of U.S. jobs and economic stimulus, or the status quo?

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economy  emissions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 27, 2013

U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz emphasized the Obama administration’s commitment to curbing CO2 emissions during an appearance at Columbia University Monday, but he also stressed that energy policies must be grounded in reality:

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hydraulic-fracturing  emissions  jobs 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 27, 2013

The Geography of Jobs: Smart Policies Are Good, But Oil Is Better

The Atlantic: If you want to understand how to create jobs -- not just a few at a time, but hundreds of thousands at once -- look to Texas and North Dakota.

Together, these two states account for a little more than 8 percent of the country's population -- about one in 12 people. But they're also responsible for 20 percent of net new jobs since the end of the recession. And, crucially, they account for "more than 100 percent of the increase in U.S. [oil] production since 2009," James Hamilton writes.

The Great Plains have been relatively great throughout the recovery for many reasons -- cheaper land, cheap wages, service sectors insulated from the housing-finance crisis that leveled parts of California, Florida, Arizona, and Nevada -- but energy has helped a lot. 

Read more: http://bit.ly/1823p3p

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emissions  economic-growth 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 16, 2013

New EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy, in remarks this week in Colorado:

“Responsible development of natural gas is an important part of our work to curb climate change and support a robust clean energy market at home.”

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oil-sands  rfs34  ethanol  emissions 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted August 13, 2013

Bloomberg News– Canada's Oil Sands Industry Using CO2 to Grow Algae, Reduce Emissions

In an effort to  curb carbon emissions, Canadian energy companies have started converting CO2 into products – taking carbon dioxide from processing oil sands, mixing it with wastewater and fed to algae, which then can be turned into cattle feed and other products.

Washington Times – China Will Surpass U.S. in Oil Imports

According to EIA data, China will take over the top spot from the U.S. as the world’s largest importer of crude oil by October, the newspaper reports. This shift in the global oil market – the first time the U.S. will not be the top importer or oil since the 1970s – “could transform geopolitics” as the U.S. shale surge continues.  

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climate-impact  keystone-xl  emissions  oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 9, 2013

IHS CERA’s new environmental assessment of the Keystone XL pipeline and pipeline-related oil sands development sends a pretty clear message to President Obama as he decides whether to approve the full project’s construction: There’s not a climate rationale for rejecting the pipeline – and along with it, tens of thousands of U.S. jobseconomic uplift and greater energy security.

While the IHS report no doubt will have little effect on pipeline opponents – less than 15 percent of Americans in this recent survey – it should get the attention of the president, who has said the Keystone XL should be built only if it would serve the national interest and not “significantly exacerbate the problem of carbon pollution.”

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