The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

vote4energy  us-energy-security  oil-and-natural-gas  innovation  investment  economic-growth  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 20, 2016

Because of vast energy reserves and the advanced technologies and expertise to safely develop them, the United States’ energy future looks promising and secure. America continues to lead the world in oil and natural gas production, which is critically important for a future in which both are projected to remain the leading fuels supporting our economy and modern way of living. Energy security, in increasing measure, is in our hands … if.

If we make the right energy policy choices, and if we select leaders who will advance those policies. If we safely harness America’s energy wealth, if we foster the private investment and innovation that launched the ongoing energy revolution – if we do all these things, there’s no reason the United States can’t benefit from secure energy far into the future.

In this election year we should identify visionary leaders on energy issues – those who see and grasp the historic opportunity provided by surging domestic oil and gas production and also the actions needed to keep that production going. In that sense, energy can be a 2016 vote-decider.

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vote4energy  oil-and-natural-gas  economic-growth  us-energy-security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 19, 2016

Energy and Campaign 2016 are a good fit. Whatever opportunity America has for present and future economic growth, individual prosperity and national security is connected to decisions voters will make this fall – and all of these things can be linked to energy.

All of us need energy, which is the reason it’s a rare bridge between the usual partisan divides. API President and CEO Jack Gerard earlier this year:

“As the two political parties look to … unify their parties behind a slate of candidates and party platforms, we want to remind them of the bipartisan nature and foundational role of our candidate: Energy, particularly oil and natural gas, which makes our modern society possible and provides our quality of life.”

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natural-gas  climate  economic-growth  carbon-emissions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 13, 2016

John Holdren, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, had some important things to say at this week’s U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) conference – noting that fossil fuels will remain the world’s dominant energy for decades to come and that the idea of America leaving its oil and natural gas reserves in the ground is “unrealistic.” The first point is a fact-based projection by EIA. The second is a rational conclusion, given the first.

Now, on to something else from Holdren’s speech – his discussion of what he called the “energy-climate challenge.” Holdren:

“Without energy there is no economy, without climate there is no environment and without economy and environment there is no well-being, there’s no civil society, there’s no personal or national security, there’s no economic growth.”

The challenge – providing the energy we need in an environmentally responsible way – certainly is a complex task. The great news is the U.S. has found a model that provides both economic growth and advances climate goals: an abundant supply (thanks to fracking) of low-cost natural gas.

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climate  economic-growth  electricity  energy  fossil-fuels  greenhouse-gas-emissions  energy-information-administration 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 11, 2016

The U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) annual energy conference is under way in Washington, D.C.  Here are a few highlights from the first slate of speakers, which included John Holdren, assistant to the president for science and technology, and Gregory Goff, Tesoro Corporation president and CEO.

Holdren went first, saying that the driver of technology in the future will be finding solutions to what he called the energy/climate challenge:

“Without energy there is no economy, without climate there is no environment and without economy and environment there’s no well-being, there’s no civil society, there’s no personal or national security, there’s no economic growth."

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oil-and-natural-gas  us-energy-security  climate  economic-growth  eia34 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 24, 2016

Let’s spend a few words supporting the work of the folks at the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) – which compiles energy data and produces reports that depict America’s current energy picture, as well as projections on how that picture could look years from now. EIA’s analyses are valuable for policymakers, energy-associated industries, a range of business sectors and regular Americans.

Unfortunately, EIA is taking criticism from some quarters because its reports, such as the Annual Energy Outlook 2016, project that fossil fuels will continue to be the largest piece of the U.S. energy portfolio well into the future. A number of critics want EIA to issue projections that are more optimistic about the use of renewables. ...

While predicting things is tricky, it looks like EIA’s 2000 projection for 2015 turned out to be pretty accurate for petroleum/other liquids and renewables.

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oil-and-natural-gas  economic-growth  access  vote4energy  us-energy-security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 21, 2016

There’s a reason pro-energy messages and objectives enjoy overwhelming support from the American people: Americans recognize that domestic energy production is nonpartisan and that it leads to prosperity throughout the land.

In this election year, the key is getting the folks running for office at all levels to get onboard with the voting public, for them to hear the strong pro-energy message voters are sending – seen in a new Harris Poll released at this week’s “Energy and the Election” event.

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oil-and-natural-gas-production  security  energy-exports  economic-growth  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 23, 2016

New figures from the U.S. Energy Information Administration show the United States remained the world’s No. 1 producer of oil and natural gas in 2015, a position the U.S. has held since 2012.

Several important points here, supporting the idea that U.S. world energy leadership is a big thing.

First, U.S. production of oil and natural gas grew last year despite continued low prices for crude last year. U.S. output of petroleum and other liquid fuels grew from 14.08 million barrels per day in 2014 to 15.04 million barrels per day in 2015. According to EIA, natural gas production rose from 74.89 billion cubic feet per day (bcf/d) in 2014 to 78.94 bcf/d in 2015, or about 13.99 million barrels of oil equivalent per day.

The second point is the vast majority of U.S. energy production is the result of safe and responsible hydraulic fracturing and modern horizontal drilling – fracking.

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jobs  infrastructure  natural-gas-pipelines  investment  economic-growth 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted May 18, 2016

The average American household has saved almost $750 in annual energy costs compared to 2008, according to recent data released by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Greater availability of domestic oil and natural gas, made possible by hydraulic fracturing, has helped drive down prices for gasoline, electricity and home heating.

Keeping affordable, reliable energy moving to families and businesses requires infrastructure -- pipelines, storage, processing, rail and maritime resources. Candidates often make infrastructure development a centerpiece of their economic plans, promising to create jobs and modernize the U.S. transportation system by improving roads, bridges, rail networks and airports. Energy infrastructure should be on that list. Shovel-ready projects abound in the energy sector.

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oil-and-natural-gas-production  security  economic-growth  energy-exports  climate  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 17, 2016

The United States in 2040 will be more energy self-sufficient, a net energy exporter and a lower source of energy-related carbon emissions as clean-burning natural gas becomes the dominant fuel for generating electricity. The leading energy source 24 years into the future – as they are now – will be oil and natural gas.  

So projects the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) in an early look at select data from EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2016 report that’s scheduled for full release in July.

The main takeaway from EIA’s “sneak preview” is the importance of the U.S. energy revolution – primarily oil and natural gas developed from shale and other tight-rock formations using safe hydraulic fracturing and modern horizontal drilling. The United States is stronger now and will be in the future thanks to domestic energy from fracking.

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infrastructure  natural-gas-pipelines  economic-growth  jobs  climate  labor-unions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 16, 2016

We kick off “Infrastructure Week 2016,” a seven-day focus on America’s infrastructure needs, sponsored by more than 100 trade associations and business and labor groups, with a conversation API President and CEO Jack Gerard and Sean McGarvey, president of North America’s Building Trades Unions, had last week with reporters covering a range of infrastructure and energy policy issues. Highlights below.

Gerard and McGarvey framed the infrastructure discussion by pointing out the way new pipelines, pipeline expansions and other projects are needed to harness America’s energy revolution and spread the benefits of the new energy abundance – to consumersworkers, businesses and to the betterment of the environment – to all parts of the country.

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