The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

analysis  infrastructure  natural-gas-supplies  pipelines  electricity  energy-investments 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 28, 2015

There’s a new report out this week that says energy infrastructure constraints have cost New England at least $7.5 billion over the past three winters – while cautioning that failing to expand natural gas and electricity infrastructure will cost the region’s households and businesses $5.4 billion in higher energy costs between 2016 and 2020. 

Other key findings in the report by the New England Coalition for Affordable Energy show that without additional infrastructure, higher energy costs will lead to the loss of 52,000 private-sector jobs over the same time period. In all, a lack of infrastructure investment could mean 167,000 jobs lost or not created. The report also found that the region could see a reduction in household spending of $12.5 billion and $9 billion in foregone infrastructure construction.

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analysis  wyoming  crude-oil-exports  economy-and-energy  gasoline-prices  income  lng34  pricewaterhousecoopers  trade  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 28, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Wyoming. We started the series with Virginia and Colorado earlier this summer and reviewed Kentucky, Tennessee , Utah and Georgia to begin this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Wyoming, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  energy-exports  crude-oil  oil-and-natural-gas-production  trade  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 27, 2015

For as long as most younger Americans can recall, the United States has been barred from exporting crude oil – a self-inflicted sanction that’s at odds with our historical role as a global leader in both free trade and oil production. For them, that’s the way it has always been – the U.S. unilaterally excluding itself from the world’s most important energy marketplace.

Yet, history, economics and security imperatives all argue that it shouldn’t stay that way. Rather, U.S. oil exports policy should be restored to its former posture, to realign policy with this reality: America’s shale energy revolution, the most recent in a series of world-changing energy events, affords the U.S. a great opportunity, and that the U.S. should pursue every means possible to harness that revolution’s benefits – including resuming the export of domestic crude.

To start, policymakers must acknowledge a couple of things: First, that maintaining the oil export ban that was imposed after the 1973 embargo is hurting U.S. competitiveness in the global economy and limiting the benefits that could and should accrue to an energy superpower.

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analysis  georgia  biofuels  economy-and-energy  epa34  greenhouse-gas-emission-reduction  income  ozone-regulations  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 27, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Georgia. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and began this week with a review of Kentucky, Tennessee and Utah. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Georgia, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  utah  crude-oil-exports  economy-and-energy  gasoline-prices  income  lng34  pricewaterhousecoopers  trade  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 26, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Utah. We started the series with Virginia and Colorado earlier this summer and reviewed Kentucky and Tennessee to begin this week. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Utah, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  oil-and-natural-gas-development  access  president-obama  epa34  regulation  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 25, 2015

Earlier this year at the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) annual conference in Washington, ClearView  Energy Partners’ Christine Tezak described the Obama administration’s energy policy as “give a little, take a little,” further characterizing it as “transitioning from scarcity to adequacy.”

It’s accurate. Handed a generational opportunity by America’s energy revolution to advance U.S. economic and security interests, the administration has responded by alternately embracing oil and natural gas development (in limited ways) and working to corral it. Given the chance to build a comprehensive, long-term energy strategy to carry the United States safely into mid-century, the administration has played “small ball” on the energy development side while unleashing a flood of unnecessary, self-limiting proposals largely untethered to scientific and economic analysis.

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analysis  tennessee  epa34  greenhouse-gas-emission-reduction  income  ozone-regulations  pricewaterhousecoopers  wood-mackenzie 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 25, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Tennessee. We started the series with Virginia on June 29 and began this week with a review of Kentucky. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Tennessee, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  energy-exports  crude-oil  regulation  methane  epa34  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 24, 2015

Two items from the weekend help sharpen the focus a strategic choice before Americans as they look to the future: Which energy path will we take?

One path leads to increased domestic energy development. It’s typified by safe and responsible oil and natural gas production that harnesses America’s energy wealth to create jobs, grow the economy and make the U.S. more secure in the world.

Another path likely would lead to very little of the above. It’s characterized by unnecessary regulation and self-limiting policies that hinder or block domestic development. America would be less secure, economically and in the world, and our allies, too.

The two paths, two very different futures – for American energy and America.

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analysis  kentucky  biofuels  economy-and-energy  ghg-emission-reduction  income  ozone-regulations  wood-mackenzie  pricewaterhousecoopers 

Reid Porter

Reid Porter
Posted August 24, 2015

Our series highlighting the economic and jobs impact of energy in each of the 50 states continues today with Kentucky. We started the series with Virginia on June 29. All information covered in this series can be found online here, arranged on an interactive map of the United States. State-specific information across the country will be populated on this map as the series continues.

As we can see with Kentucky, the energy impacts of the states individually combine to form energy’s national economic and jobs picture: 9.8 million jobs supported and $1.2 trillion in value added.

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analysis  energy-tomorrow  energy-information-administration  energy-outlook 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 21, 2015

America’s energy strategy, short-term and long-term, is the sum of inputs: resource and production data, policy goals, technology, market conditions and more. These underpin the national conversation about the energy future of the United States and prospects for energy security – today, tomorrow and down the road.

Using federal energy information data we’ve launched a new website, Our Energy Tomorrow. It’s an interactive web experience that allows visitors to explore a variety of energy futures, based on inputs they select – including resource availability, advances in technology and federal legislation. These in turn generate a number of useable, shareable charts, graphs and trend lines that illustrate the energy scenario chosen.

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