The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

natural-gas  energy  economic-growth  domestic-oil 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 24, 2012

News this week of increased domestic oil and natural gas production is welcome indeed – because increased production means jobs, economic growth and greater energy security for America.

That the president is calling for more American oil and natural gas, while acknowledging that the hard-working men and women of the oil and gas industry are helping lead our economic recovery is great, too. Thanks, Mr. President, for recognizing that this industry can create jobs and produce the energy to fuel our economy, while building a base for manufacturing and other industries.

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natural-gas  energy-information-administration 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 23, 2012

The outstanding statistic in the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s preview of its 2012 Annual Energy Outlook is the forecast for natural gas. EIA says that gas from shale and tight gas will account for 70 percent of the United States’ overall natural gas supply in 2035. Here’s their chart:

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natural-gas  energy-information-administration  energy-demand  energy  eia34  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 23, 2012

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the world’s demand for energy is going to increase by nearly 50 percent by 2035. Based on EIA projections, this graphic from API’s 2012 State of American Energy report shows that oil and natural gas is expected to supply 52 percent of that energy, only slightly less than today’s share (55 percent).

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policy  oil-sands  natural-gas  keystone-xl  energy 

Kyle Isakower

Kyle Isakower
Posted January 19, 2012

As befitting a day when, for the president, political interest trumped the national interest, he opened his 2012 campaign advertising with a commercial touting – wait for it – his energy accomplishments. And they say irony is dead. The commercial links to a webpage trumpeting the president “Boosting Domestic Energy Production.”

While it is great that the president recognizes Americans’ overwhelming support for increased domestic oil and natural gas production, any gains made in the past few years have happened not because of the president’s policies, but in spite of them. Consider this: The area of energy production the president has the most control over is drilling on federal lands.  In a study we released yesterday, this is what boosting domestic energy production looks like in the Western states:

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pennsylvania  ohio  north-dakota  natural-gas  keystone-xl  domestic-energy  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 12, 2012

From where we sit, a new White House report that gives substantial credit to natural gas production for recent growth in U.S. manufacturing looks pretty darn good. In this economy, lots of Americans surely would agree.

The report, “Investing in America: Building an Economy That Lasts,” notes the loss of 3 million manufacturing jobs from 2001-2007 – but then the addition of 334,000 of those jobs the past two years. That second number is due in no small part to the production of natural gas from shale through hydraulic fracturing. The White House:

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north-dakota  natural-gas  hydraullic-fracturing  fracking  domestic-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 6, 2012

Pretty neat animation by the Energy Information Administration, showing the growth of oil and natural gas production in the Bakken shale play between 1985 and 2010. You can see the locations and the yields of different wells within the Bakken in time-lapse fashion. EIA:

“Oil production growth in the Bakken shale play mirrors somewhat the growth in natural gas production in the Barnett play (Texas). Like the Barnett, the Bakken drilling and production animation … shows that drilling activity built up gradually and eventually led to rapid growth, particularly from 2006 to 2010. Production grew because of increased use of horizontal drilling and the addition of hydraulic fracturing, coupled with elevated prices for crude oil and other natural gas liquids.”

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