The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

domestic-access  domestic-energy  drilling  energy  energy-information-administration  energy-policy  permits  renewable-energy  revenue 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted May 18, 2011

The future is going to require a lot of energy, of all kinds. World energy consumption is projected to grow nearly 50 percent by 2035. Renewable energy is projected to increase by nearly 200 percent by 2035 over 2008, thanks to leadership and investment from our own industry and others.

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domestic-energy  horizontal-drilling  leasing  michigan  encana  utica-shale  oil-and-natural-gas  revenue 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted November 2, 2010

The State of Michigan held a lease auction last week, in which leases for nearly 274,000 acres of state lands were awarded to the highest bidders for oil and natural gas development. The sale raised $9.65 million in bonus bids on top of the $178 million offered for leases during the very competitive May 2010 sale. 

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earnings  oil-companies  oil-company-earnings  revenue  downstream  upstream 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted November 6, 2009

Eighteen oil and natural gas companies had reported their third quarter 2009 earnings as of yesterday afternoon, and the results have been a mixed bag. Companies that focus on oil and natural gas production--also called the upstream sector of the business--experienced a better financial quarter than large integrated companies that have both upstream and downstream operations--refining and marketing. The companies that fared worst are in the downstream portion of the business, and some of them actually lost money. 

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energy  energy-policy  revenue  royalties  royalty-in-kind 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 16, 2009

Today, U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced that he would terminate the Royalty-in-Kind (RIK) program, which collected $6.6 billion in oil and gas deliveries in fiscal 2008, and is one of the government's largest sources of non-tax revenue. The program is an effective means of ensuring that the American people receive fair compensation for development of federal resources.

Terminating this straight-forward method of handling royalty payments runs the risk of raising administrative costs and adding additional layers of paperwork required to determine the value of oil and gas production. The Minerals Management Service itself noted administrative efficiencies brought on by the program, and pointed out that another benefit of RIK is the reduction in costly lawsuits tied to product valuation.

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canada  domestic-energy  energy  energy-policy  oil-sands  revenue 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 16, 2009

This week, Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper will visit the United States, and high on the agenda in discussions with President Obama should be our country's energy partnership with Canada.

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access  domestic-energy  energy  energy-policy  energy-taxes  pricewaterhousecoopers  revenue  taxes 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted September 9, 2009

A new PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) study released today found that the U.S. oil and natural gas industry supports more than 9 million American jobs and makes significant economic contributions as an employer and purchaser of American goods and services. 

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domestic-energy  energy  energy-development  hydraulic-fracturing  over-regulation  revenue  technology 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted July 29, 2009

In a recent Houston Chronicle op-ed, Richard Burleson, managing partner of Houston-based and energy-focused law firm Burleson Cooke L.L.P., cautions the administration and Congress against over-regulating hydraulic fracturing. As we've explained in this blog, hydraulic fracturing is a process where fluid is pumped under pressure down through the wellbore to make tiny fissures in the rock, allowing natural gas and oil to flow more easily up through the well. 

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domestic-energy  energy  natural-gas  revenue  taxes 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted July 28, 2009

Pennsylvanians are sitting on a buried treasure. It's called the Marcellus Shale formation, and a new study quantifies its potential impact on the state's economy and jobs. According to the study, the state's economy will receive an infusion of $14.17 billion in 2010 due to Marcellus Shale natural gas development, creating more than 98,000 jobs and generating $800 million in state and local tax revenue. 

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