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Energy Tomorrow Blog

ozone-standards  epa34  regulation  economic-impacts  emissions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 14, 2014

Earlier this month the National Association of Manufacturers issued a report measuring the potential impacts of a new, stricter ground-level ozone air quality standard that’s being proposed by EPA. The estimated national results are economically devastating: reduction of U.S. GDP by $270 billion per year, 2.9 million fewer job equivalents per year on average through 2040 and potentially increased natural gas and electricity costs for manufacturers and households.

The picture is the same on a state-by-state basis. Over the next few days we’ll highlight some of the individual state impacts from the report, starting with North Carolina.

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regulations  epa-proposals  ozone-standards  refineries  rfs34  emissions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 11, 2014

API has put together a new infographic that captures the breadth of this administration’s policies – especially an ongoing regulatory push from EPA – that could slow progress that’s being built on America’s energy revolution. (Click here to pull up the PDF.)

Here’s the thrust: The administration’s policies and regulatory efforts are hindering needed energy and economic progress. It is delaying infrastructure, such as pending liquefied natural gas export projects and the Keystone XL pipeline. It is sustaining the broken Renewable Fuel Standard and its ethanol mandates, which could negatively affect consumers and the larger economy. It’s threatening new regulation that would needlessly impact the refining sector, while advancing a stricter ozone standard that would put virtually the entire country out of compliance.

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epa-regulations  emissions  ozone-standards  economic-impacts 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 31, 2014

A couple of new warning lights concerning EPA’s regulatory approach in proposed standards for power sector emissions as well as the anticipated standard for ozone. In both cases the agency appears poised to regulate without thoroughly reckoning potential impacts that could harm the economy and individual consumers.

First, there’s EPA’s effort to regulate power sector emissions – with carbon pollution guidelines proposed for existing power plants, on top of the already proposed guidelines for new electric utility generating units.

Howard Feldman, API’s director of regulatory and scientific affairs, testified at EPA field hearings this week that the agency’s proposals could result in higher energy costs, impacting the oil and natural gas industry’s international competitiveness and negatively affecting the broader economy. Feldman also warned that the proposals could set a precedent for EPA incursion into management of the power sector that’s beyond its authority under the Clean Air Act.

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ozone-standards  epa34  oil-and-natural-gas-development  regulation  economic-impacts  energy-101 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 27, 2014

When EPA proposed tightening the national ozone standards a few years ago, President Obama told the agency to stand down. The existing standard of 75 parts per billion (ppb) wasn’t due for review, and there was concern stricter standards might harm the economy.

It’s a concern that hasn’t diminished as the agency starts regular review of ozone National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Howard Feldman, API’s director of regulatory and scientific affairs, discussed the review during a conference call with reporters:

“We recognize that EPA has a statutory duty to periodically review the standards. However, the current review of health studies has not identified compelling evidence for more stringent standards. Tightened standards could impose unachievable emission reduction requirements on virtually every part of the nation, including rural and undeveloped areas. These could be the costliest EPA regulations ever.”

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e1534  energy-policy  environmental-protection-agency  epa34  ghg34  greenhouse-gas  greenhouse-gas-emissions  over-regulation  ozone-standards 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted October 22, 2010

Yesterday API hosted a blogger conference call to discuss several U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposals on the table that could harm the United States' economy. Topics included the agency's premature approval of E15, a gasoline blend containing 15 percent ethanol, as well as the agency's plans to regulate greenhouse gases, toughen ozone standards, and even govern things like farm dust and boilers. As we have noted previously here on the Energy Tomorrow Blog, a recent report by the Manufacturers Alliance/MAPI estimates that the proposed ozone standard alone could destroy 7.3 million U.S. jobs. 

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air-quality  energy-policy  epa34  air-pollution  ozone-standards 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted October 20, 2010

Whenever the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issues new regulations, it usually includes information about the impact on human health. 

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domestic-energy  energy-policy  environmental-protection-agency  epa34  gdp34  manufacturers-alliance  over-regulation  ozone-standards 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted September 22, 2010

The numbers are mind-boggling. The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposal to tighten ozone standards could result in the loss of 7.3 million U.S. jobs by 2020, add $1 trillion in new regulatory costs per year between 2020 and 2030, and sharply reduce the nation's productivity. Gross Domestic Product (GDP) would be reduced by $676.8 billion in 2020, accounting for 3.6 percent of U.S. productivity. 

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