The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

oil-and-natural-gas-jobs  solar-energy  economic-impacts  oil-and-natural-gas-production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 14, 2016

If you believe America is best served by taking a true, all-of-the-above approach to energy – and we do – there’s not a lot of value in getting into a donnybrook over which energy sector employs the most people. America needs all of its energy sources and all of each energy sector’s jobs. That said, let’s set the record a little straighter in the wake of a recent report by the Solar Foundation.

The solar report trumpets 209,000 workers employed by the solar industry – including installation, manufacturing, sales & distribution, project development and “all others.” The report compares that figure with 187,000 people employed in just the oil and natural gas industry’s extraction segment, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), an apples-to-oranges comparison that could leave a wrong impression.

We looked at the comparison and figured something is missing.

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state-of-american-energy  oil-and-natural-gas-production  economic-growth  jobs  us-energy-security  crude-oil-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 5, 2016

There are many ways to gauge the current strength of American energy. The U.S. is producing nearly twice as much oil as it did less than a decade ago, which, combined with natural gas output, has made America the world’s leading producer.

Yet, the real-world impact of America’s energy revolution offers a more meaningful picture. New tensions are roiling the Middle East, yet global crude markets have remained relatively calm – unimaginable a few years ago. Meanwhile, a tanker carrying U.S. crude oil left port headed for Europe – the first since the lifting of America’s 40-year-old ban on domestic exports. There’s the reach of our energy revolution.

In his State of American Energy remarks, API President and CEO Jack Gerard focused on the growth of U.S. energy and its benefits – and also the opportunity to sustain them with sound energy policies based on facts and science.

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crude-oil-exports  lng-exports  economic-growth  oil-and-natural-gas-production  us-energy-security  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 4, 2016

As we write, the United States is once again an exporter of crude oil. Sure, in the past the federal government has allowed limited crude exports. The oil tanker that left the Port of Corpus Christi, Texas, late last week is the bearer of the first freely traded U.S. crude in about four decades – made possible by congressional legislation that President Obama signed to end a 1970s-era ban on exports. It’s a new day indeed.

But wait, there’s more. Cheniere Energy  says it has begun liquefying natural gas at its new export terminal in Louisiana, setting the stage for its first LNG export cargo this month.

Both are big-time energy developments for the United States – opportunities created by a domestic energy revolution largely driven by safely harnessing vast shale reserves with advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. 

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offshore-access  economic-growth  energy-poicy  hydraullic-fracturing  oil-and-natural-gas-production  jobs  keystone-xl-pipeline  ozone-regulations 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted December 29, 2015

2015 ends on a high note for U.S. energy policy as Congress voted to repeal the obsolete, ‘70s-era ban on crude exports. Dozens of studies agree that lifting the restrictions will put downward pressure on gas prices, reduce the trade deficit, and provide a boost to economic growth and U.S. energy production.

Throughout the year, our status as the world’s leading producer of oil and natural gas continued to provide savings to American families and businesses while significantly enhancing our energy security. A review of the year’s energy developments shows how the American energy renaissance is paying off for consumers while also demonstrating that policymakers have some work to do in 2016.

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offshore-safety  oil-and-natural-gas-production  bsee  regulation  safe-operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 2, 2015

A couple of important takeaways from this week’s Capitol Hill hearing on a proposed federal well control rule for offshore drilling:

First, offshore drilling is safer today than it has ever been – for the Gulf of Mexico, Alaska and Pacific regions. In coordination with federal regulators, industry has improved the safety of offshore development – in terms of safety systems management, prevention and response – while advancing the nation’s energy security through continued offshore oil and natural gas production.

This is seen in the approximately 275 API exploration and production standards that include offshore operations, more than 100 of which have been incorporated into federal regulation. 

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affordable-energy  american-energy-security  co2-emissions  consumer-products  oil-and-natural-gas-production  economic-benefits  gasoline-prices  energy-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 25, 2015

Thanksgiving is about taking a moment to give thanks for our good fortune. A festival of gratitude with food, family and friends – maybe with a little football thrown in.  So here's a list of some of the things that we’re thankful for this holiday season, from A to Z.

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crude-oil-exports  oil-and-natural-gas-production  security  economic-growth  jobs 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 29, 2015

Lacking factual, substantial reasons for keeping the United States’ antiquated ban on crude oil exports, those who oppose letting U.S. crude reach the global marketplace are left to make a non-factual, unsubstantial case instead.

In a letter to the editor in the New York Times, the Sierra Club’s Michael Brune offers up a couple of scary fictions – in time for Halloween – to distract Americans from the stark, “off oil” agenda that Brune and many others advocate: a harsher, less healthy, less hospitable world minus the reliable, affordable fuels that are fundamental to modern living.

API President and CEO Jack Gerard recently called them out for the false choice that’s central to their advocacy:

“There is a vocal minority who believe that instead of growing our economy to lift people out of poverty we should reduce our current standard of living and cap our potential. We reject this notion and encourage policy makers to continue down the path we have shown to work, supplying abundant, affordable, and reliable energy to consumers while lowering our impact on the environment.”


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analysis  oil-and-natural-gas-production  hydraulic-fracturing  economic-growth  energy-security  energy-exports  jobs  ethanol 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 30, 2015

America’s energy revolution means … a United States that’s more energy self-sufficient – less dependent on others, more secure in the world and better positioned to help friends abroad; economic growth and job creation – and with the right policy choices, a golden opportunity to secure American prosperity well into the future; and a stronger U.S. trading posture that, with energy exports, could benefit consumers

Let’s look at some charts that illustrate this American energy renaissance – which is based on the surge in domestic production that has accompanied the growth of safe, advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling since the mid-2000s.

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analysis  energy-exports  crude-oil  oil-and-natural-gas-production  trade  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 27, 2015

For as long as most younger Americans can recall, the United States has been barred from exporting crude oil – a self-inflicted sanction that’s at odds with our historical role as a global leader in both free trade and oil production. For them, that’s the way it has always been – the U.S. unilaterally excluding itself from the world’s most important energy marketplace.

Yet, history, economics and security imperatives all argue that it shouldn’t stay that way. Rather, U.S. oil exports policy should be restored to its former posture, to realign policy with this reality: America’s shale energy revolution, the most recent in a series of world-changing energy events, affords the U.S. a great opportunity, and that the U.S. should pursue every means possible to harness that revolution’s benefits – including resuming the export of domestic crude.

To start, policymakers must acknowledge a couple of things: First, that maintaining the oil export ban that was imposed after the 1973 embargo is hurting U.S. competitiveness in the global economy and limiting the benefits that could and should accrue to an energy superpower.

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analysis  energy-exports  trade  crude-oil  liquefied-natural-gas  lng34  economic-growth  oil-and-natural-gas-production  american-petroleum-institute 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 11, 2015

The U.S. Commerce Department’s recent mid-year trade report illustrates how surging domestic oil and natural gas production is helping our economy – and strongly suggests what increased domestic output could do if U.S. crude oil and liquefied natural gas (LNG) had unhindered access to global markets.

According to Commerce, the U.S. trade deficit among petroleum and petroleum products fell 56.1 percent the first six months of this year compared to the first six months of 2014 (exhibit 9). That growth helped hold the total U.S. year-over-year trade balance steady, even as the trade deficit in non-petroleum products increased 23.1 percent. API Chief Economist John Felmy:

“Despite a very competitive global market, the U.S. energy revolution continues to push our trade balance in a positive direction. Oil imports remain on the decline, and strong exports of petroleum and refined products are creating new opportunities for America to bring wealth and jobs back to U.S. shores.”

For that trend to continue, though, the United States must pursue energy trading opportunities with the same vigor it pursues trade in other areas. A 1970s-era ban on crude oil exports should be lifted, and LNG export projects should be approved by the government so that domestic producers have every chance to access global markets.

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