The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

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Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 12, 2015

Wall Street Journal: The U.S. government Monday conditionally approved Royal Dutch Shell PLC’s plans to drill in the Arctic Ocean this summer, removing the biggest remaining obstacle before the company can explore for oil and natural gas in the Arctic’s frigid, isolated waters.

The announcement adds to a mix of decisions by the Obama administration that have restricted and granted new domestic fossil-fuel development.

Though affecting just one company, the approval is a victory for the oil-and-gas industry, which has criticized recent regulations affecting the sector, including tougher requirements on hydraulic fracturing and trains hauling flammable oil. Monday’s approval is tied to regulations proposed by the government in February for Arctic drilling operations off the coast of Alaska that could pave the way for additional companies exploring in the region.

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analysis  offshore-energy  offshore-leasing-plan  atlantic-ocs  outer-continental-shelf  oil-and-natural-gas-development  safe-operations  boem  interior-department 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 30, 2015

It’s noteworthy that there’s bipartisanship in Congress on offshore energy development. Last week a group of Republican U.S. House and Senate members signed onto a letter urging the Interior Department to increase access to energy reserves on the nation’s outer continental shelf. It follows a March 26 letter from Virginia’s two Democratic senators and a March 27 letter from a dozen House Democrats supporting offshore energy development.

Bipartisanship in Washington is quite a rare bird, so it’s significant to see it form around the need to develop domestic offshore energy.

Equally important: Strongly worded concern from the most recent letter’s signers that the draft 2017-2022 plan for oil and natural gas leasing offered by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management not be weakened by removing any of the leasing areas in the proposal.

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oil-and-natural-gas-production  domestic-energy-access  eia34  offshore-energy  onshore-development  shale-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 6, 2015

Statistics in the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s Monthly Energy Review for March show U.S. domestic energy production meeting about 89 percent of the country’s total energy demand. That’s up from 84 percent in 2013 and 2012 and reflects a key result of the domestic energy revolution: growing U.S. self-sufficiency.

EIA data shows U.S. energy production as a percentage of total demand. Total energy production (fossil fuels, nuclear electric power and renewables – again, as a percentage of total U.S. energy demand -- was about 69 percent in 2005, and it grew to about 89 percent last year. The share of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal) accounted for approximately 55 percent in 2005, growing to about 70 percent last year.


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arctic  oil-and-natural-gas-development  offshore-energy  chukchi-sea  alaska  economic-benefits  boem 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 1, 2015

News that the Interior Department has reaffirmed Shell’s right to drill in the Chukchi Sea off the Alaskan coast is an important step toward to Arctic energy development. While the company still must secure individual drilling permits and overall federal approval of its exploration plan, this week’s action advances the larger objective of safe and responsible development of an extremely valuable energy reserve. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell:

“The Arctic is an important component of the Administration’s national energy strategy, and we remain committed to taking a thoughtful and balanced approach to oil and gas leasing and exploration offshore Alaska.”

The oil and natural gas industry agrees. In official comments to the federal Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), API and seven other industry-related associations argue that developing Arctic oil and natural gas off the coast of Alaska is essential to U.S. energy security. It’s also vital to the “long-term viability” of the Trans-Alaskan Pipeline System that connects Alaskan energy with the Lower 48. Developing Arctic energy is one of the keys to a robust offshore leasing program, which the federal government is drawing up right now.

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offshore-energy  oil-and-natural-gas-development  outer-continental-shelf  atlantic-ocs  wind-energy  economic-benefits  tax-revenues  safe-operations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 29, 2015

Offshore energy is getting lots of attention this week, which is good. Offshore energy is vital to America’s economy and energy security.

This week the Interior Department proposed the first draft of its next five-year program for offshore oil and natural gas leasing, in the 2017-2020 timeframe. While the draft plan doesn’t go far enough, it could include the first Atlantic lease sale in decades, and that would be a positive step. Meanwhile, on Thursday the federal government is scheduled to hold a lease sale for offshore wind in the Atlantic.

All of the above …

That’s more than a rhetorical flourish. America will need energy from all available sources in the future – thus the case for a genuine all-of-the-above strategy. We hope this week’s wind sale is successful.

Energy isn’t a zero-sum game, and neither is energy job creation. Offshore energy development of any kind can generate jobs and raise significant revenue for government. The country benefits and so do individual Americans – you know, folks holding the middle-class jobs everyone wants to support.

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offshore-energy  boem  oil-and-natural-gas-development  economic-growth  gulf-of-mexico 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 21, 2014

There’s much good to report from this week’s federal offshore drilling lease auction for the western Gulf of Mexico. But we can do better.

The good: nearly $110 million in apparent high bids over 81 blocks covering more than 430,000 acres, according to the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM). The bid total represents a moderate increase over last year’s western Gulf sale that generated slightly more than $102 million in bids. BOEM estimates the sale eventually could yield 116 million to 200 million barrels of oil and 538 billion cubic feet (bcf) to 938 bcf of natural gas.

Broadly speaking, the fact that the federal government conducted an offshore lease sale is in itself encouraging. Development of vast offshore oil and natural gas reserves starts with leasing areas for exploration. That’s where we can do better. More sales are needed to begin the process of finding and developing offshore energy on the outer continental shelf, 87 percent of which is off limits by policy.

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virginia  offshore-energy  economic-benefits  infrastructure  oil-and-natural-gas-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 28, 2014

Virginia is for lovers – of domestic oil and natural gas production and investments in energy infrastructure. That’s what you see in a recent Harris Poll of registered voters in the commonwealth: Strong support for developing domestic oil and natural gas, including offshore reserves, as well as increased spending on infrastructure.

Some of the numbers:

  • 80 percent support increased production of domestic oil and natural gas reserves. Just 11 percent oppose.
  • 89 percent support increased development of U.S. energy infrastructure.
  • 94 percent agree increased domestic oil and natural gas output could help strengthen America’s energy security.
  • 91 percent agree increased domestic oil and natural gas production could help stimulate the economy.

And so it goes – with similar, slam-dunk margins on other questions, from benefits to U.S. consumers to economic growth.

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offshore-access  offshore-energy  offshore-lease  jobs  economy  revenue  outer-continental-shelf  energy-security 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 5, 2013

America’s vast offshore energy reserves present an opportunity to improve our economy, increase our energy security and create tens of thousands of jobs. According to a new study, opening the U.S. Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) to offshore oil and natural gas development could turn that opportunity into reality. API’s Director of Upstream Erik Milito and the National Ocean Industries Association’s Randall Luthi outlined the study for reporters today. Milito:

“Oil and natural gas production off our Atlantic coast is a potential gold mine. Developing oil and natural gas in the Atlantic could put hundreds of thousands of Americans to work, make us more energy secure, and bring in needed revenue for the government. But none of these benefits will appear unless the federal government follows pro-development energy policies.”

According to the study, oil and natural gas development in the Atlantic OCS between 2017 and 2035 could:

  • Create nearly 280,000 new jobs along the East Coast and across the country.
  • Result in an additional $195 billion in new private investment.
  • Contribute up to $23.5 billion per year to the U.S. economy.
  • Add 1.3 million barrels of oil equivalent per day to domestic energy production, which is about 70 percent of current output from the Gulf of Mexico.
  • Generate $51 billion in new revenue for the government.

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offshore-energy  keystone-xl-pipeline  energy-policy  energy  election  domestic-energy  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 8, 2012

A big winner in the recent election: Energy. Both presidential candidates voiced supported for domestic oil and natural gas development, and President Obama’s re-election was based, in part, on his commitment to American oil and gas.

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alternative-energy  congress  deepwater-horizon  department-of-the-interior  domestic-energy  energy  energy-policy  energy-taxes  gas-prices  gasoline  gulf-of-mexico  gulf-oil-spill  offshore-energy  oil-leak  oil-spill  shallow-water-drilling20170719t150143 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted December 30, 2010

As the nation approaches the New Year, reporters around the country are writing about the energy outlook for 2011. There are quotes from analysts predicting oil and gasoline prices; opinion leaders discussing energy policies likely to be considered by the 112th Congress; and professors explaining the relative merits of fossil fuels and alternatives. 

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