The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

keystone-xl-pipeline  infrastructure  jobs  energy-security  fracking  manufacturing  technology 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 21, 2014

Forbes (Christopher Helman): Whenever businesses and bureaucrats don’t have the guts to stand behind a decision they’ve made, they release the news late on a Friday. In the case of the Obama administration’s move to delay indefinitely a decision to approve or deny the Keystone XL pipeline, it speaks volumes that the announcement was made not just on any Friday, but on the convergence of Good Friday and Passover.

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co2-emissions  natural-gas-benefits  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  economic-growth  manufacturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 4, 2014

It’s hard to overstate the significance of the role that abundant, clean-burning natural gas had in bringing U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions to a 20-year low in 2012. While the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expected 2013 emissions to inch up – mostly due to increased coal use in electrical generation – the projected level still would be more than 10 percent below where emissions were in 2005

While lowering CO2 emissions is talked about in various circles, the fact is the United States already is doing it, thanks largely to natural gas – 60 percent of the U.S. total produced with advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling.

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american-energy  fracking  jobs  lng-exports  manufacturing  texas  ohio 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 28, 2014

The nation's energy boom, stoked by technological advances both onshore and offshore, drove significant economic growth for the oil and gas industry, which also fueled a corresponding population boom in resource-rich areas such as North Dakota and Texas between 2007 and 2012, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

The bureau's Economic Census Advance Report, released Wednesday, provides the first comprehensive look at the U.S. economy since the Great Recession, supplying data on a series of key metrics across more than 1,000 industries. The report comes out every five years.

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lng-exports  liquefied-natural-gas  economic-growth  jobs-creation  manufacturing  hydraulic-fracturing  energy-department 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 21, 2014

The Huntsman Corporation’s Peter Huntsman has this op-ed in USA Today that invokes a poll in which people were asked to respond to these statements:

Some say that exporting American natural gas to other countries will increase economic growth, keep thousands employed, and help increase domestic production of natural gas. Others say that American natural gas should be used here at home, where it can lead to thousands of new manufacturing jobs, grow the entire American economy, and keep prices of natural gas affordable. Which comes closest to your view?

Actually, it’s a false choice, a little bit of opinion polling flim-flammery. We can have both – as careful, scholarly research (see here and here) has shown. We have ample natural gas reserves to supply the needs here at home as well as those of friendly overseas buyers.

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manufacturing  oil-and-natural-gas-jobs  oil-and-natural-gas-development  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 20, 2014

A new study conducted for the U.S. Conference of Mayors underscores the significant economic link between America’s energy renaissance and a surge in U.S. manufacturing job creation and business activity. Some of the key findings in the IHS Global Insight study:

  • Abundant supplies of natural gas and oil lowered costs and increased refining volumes, resulting in a surge in plastic, rubber, resin and chemical manufacturing. These industries saw a combined employment increase of 2.6 percent across all metropolitan areas (2011-2012).
  • Energy-intensive manufacturing added more than 196,000 jobs and increased real sales by $124 billion in the nation’s metro areas from 2010-2012.
  • Energy-intensive manufacturing will expand by more than 1 percent annually nationwide through 2020, with 72 percent of those jobs going to U.S. metro areas.

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supply  oil-and-natural-gas  manufacturing  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 14, 2014

Surge in Oil from U.S., Canada Helps Meet Global Demand

Wall Street Journal: LONDON—The dramatic increase in oil supply from the U.S. and Canada—coupled with a surprise surge in Iraqi output—helped stave off global demand pressures brought on by a cold U.S. winter and geopolitical concerns over rising tensions between Russia and Ukraine.

The International Energy Agency, a watchdog for the world's biggest energy consumers, said North American output helped mitigate a bigger-than-expected draw from global crude inventories, caused by a colder than usual winter in the U.S. Surging Iraqi crude output, which rose to its highest level since 1979, also helped keep global markets supplied, and prices in check.

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natural-gas-from-shale  shale-jobs  shale-energy  manufacturing  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 28, 2014

The folks at Energy In Depth have a great video out that captures the key role natural gas is playing in the regeneration of U.S. manufacturing. 

It’s fairly simple: Because of available, affordable natural gas U.S. manufacturers are finding it more economical to conduct operations right here at home – producing more, hiring more, contributing more to the economy. As the video depicts, natural gas will help support more than 500,000 new U.S. manufacturing jobs by 2020.


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innovation  manufacturing  jobs  economy  fracking  american-energy  global-energy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 25, 2014

American Shale Gas and Tight Oil: Reshaping the Global Energy Balance

IHS Unconventional Energy Blog: The development of shale gas and tight oil in the United States constitutes an “unconventional revolution,” owing to its scale and speed. It is already having a profound global impact: upending energy markets, reshaping competitiveness in the world economy, and portending major shifts in global politics.

The unconventional revolution was born out of advances in two technologies. Hydraulic fracturing — or “fracking” — was introduced at the end of the 1940s. Efforts to apply this technique to dense shale in Texas began in the early 1980s. But it took two decades to perfect the combination of fracking and horizontal drilling that would drive the new boom. And it wasn’t until 2008 that these techniques began to have a major impact.

Since then, however, growth has been remarkable. Shale gas currently accounts for nearly half of U.S. natural gas production, and U.S. prices have fallen to one third of European levels and one-fifth of Asian levels. Tight oil, produced with the same techniques as shale gas, has led to a 60 percent rise in U.S. oil production since 2008. This increase of three million barrels per day is larger than the national output of nine of the 13 OPEC countries. The International Energy Agency predicts that the U.S. will soon overtake Saudi Arabia and Russia as the world’s largest oil producer.

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trade  economy  jobs  education  manufacturing  exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 24, 2014

Energy Trade is a Key Part of Overall U.S. Trade Flows

EIA Energy Today: Energy trade has long been a key component of overall U.S. trade flows. Recent developments in U.S. energy production, notably the rapid growth of tight oil and shale gas output, are leading to significant changes in the nation's energy trade flows. Another important factor is consumption trends, which reflect both increased efficiency of vehicles and other energy-using equipment, and structural changes in the economy. This article, which focuses on current energy trade in the context of overall trade flows, will be followed by several others in the coming days that consider the evolution of trade flows in major energy fuel categories since 2002.

 

As shown in the figure above, overall U.S. trade includes both goods and services but is dominated by goods. In 2013, as in other recent years, the United States was a net importer of goods and a net exporter of services. Energy accounted for 15% of gross U.S. goods imports in 2013, while energy exports, which have grown significantly in recent years, accounted for 7% of overall U.S. goods exports. Focusing on the net U.S. trade position, shown by the black line in the chart above, net energy imports account for nearly half of the total U.S. trade deficit in goods and services.

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jobs  economy  american-energy  manufacturing  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 14, 2014

How Low-Cost Natural Gas May be Helping to Fuel a Resurgence in U.S. Manufacturing

Fox Business: Inexpensive natural gas may be giving the U.S. a powerful and unique cost advantage that is incentivizing hundreds of companies to manufacture in the United States.

According to research conducted by Boston Consulting Group that was released Thursday, cheap natural gas will have a critical impact on U.S. manufacturing over the next several years that will benefit a wide variety of industries, from feedstock to finished goods.

“We are seeing an impact,” said BCG Senior Partner Hal Sirkin. “We can identify over 200 companies that are part of this manufacturing renaissance, moving jobs back to the United States.”

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