The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

energy-exports  lng-exports  crude-oil  economic-growth  keystone-xl  oil-sands  fracking 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 4, 2014

Opponents of Natural Gas Exports Have It All Wrong

WSJ MarketWatch (Furchtgott-Roth): Americans opposed to the export of U.S. natural gas give many reasons for their position. But almost all of them are wrong.

The problem is that people underestimate the amount of this country’s natural gas and the potential effect exports could have on the world market.

Russia has swallowed parts of Georgia and Ukraine. No one is proposing that America send soldiers to defend those countries, even though we guaranteed Ukraine’s sovereignty in 1994 under the Budapest Memorandum. Instead, we can help our allies by diminishing Russia’s economic power over them. And that power rests on oil and gas.

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keystone-xl  public-opinion  labor  oil-sands  canada 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 19, 2014

Independents, Republicans and Democrats want the Keystone XL pipeline built. That’s the bottom line in Pew Research Center’s latest poll. Overall, the pipeline enjoys strong support, with 61 percent in favor while 27 percent are opposed – consistent with previous Pew’s previous Keystone XL poll in September.  

Look more closely, and Pew finds Keystone XL’s support bridges America’s political divide. Pew’s chart to the left shows that 84 percent of Republicans and 61 percent of Independents support the pipeline’s construction. More Democrats favor Keystone XL (49 percent) than oppose it (38 percent). This is what’s called a political “no-brainer.”

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economic-growth  keystone-xl  oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 18, 2014

Check out a new video that zeroes in on President Obama’s opportunities to help U.S. workers, the nation’s economy and America’s energy security by approving the Keystone XL pipeline for construction.

As the video points out, by approving the Keystone XL, President Obama can green light a significant infrastructure project that’s shovel-ready – and ready to put thousands of Americans to work during its construction phase. The pipeline would provide a broad boost to the economy in terms of worker earnings, spending on materials and economic activity from support and associated sectors.

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keystone-xl  oil-sands  economic-growth  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 3, 2014

The Keystone XL pipeline now is in the “national interest determination” phase of a long process to gain federal approval for construction. Having cleared its fifth State Department environmental review, the project is to be judged by on whether its construction serves the U.S. national interest. Last week’s State Department report listed the key factors that go into that determination:

To make this decision (i.e., the National Interest Determination), the Secretary of State, through the Department, considers many factors, including energy security; environmental, cultural, and economic impacts; foreign policy; and compliance with relevant state and federal regulations.

Let’s examine some of these. First, energy security: Would construction of the full Keystone XL pipeline further the energy security of the United States?

Yes.

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american-energy  energy-markets  global-energy  exports  infrastructure  fracking  jobs  economy  keystone-xl 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 27, 2014

Free America’s Energy Future: Drop Washington’s Counterproductive Oil and Natural Gas Ban

Forbes (Doug Bandow): For years people have been told to expect a dismal energy future.  But because of rapid free market innovation, Americans now can look forward to a future of energy abundance.  The U.S. could even become a leading exporter—if Washington gets out of the way.

Successive presidents and Congresses imposed controls, approved subsidies, created bureaucracies, and issued proclamations.  The most common commitment was to achieve “energy independence.”  But President Ronald Reagan set the stage for today’s energy advances by unilaterally eliminating oil price controls and pushing Congress to drop natural gas price and use restrictions.

His successors, however, have regressed back to expensive social engineering.  George W. Bush declared war on the common light bulb.  Barack Obama poured billions into the coffers of well-connected alternative energy firms, several of which, such as Solyndra, have gone bankrupt.  And everyone continued to support the authoritarian Gulf kleptocracies, led by Saudi Arabia, to ensure access to imported oil.

Yet an energy revolution is underway.  Observed Mark P. Mills, an Adjunct Fellow at the Manhattan Institute, “The game-changing technologies that have emerged involve hydrocarbons:  natural gas, oil, and coal.”  Major advances have been made in locating and extracting resources—such as horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or fracking—and operating in more distant and hostile environments.


Read morehttp://onforb.es/1f7kRXN

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energy-security  american-energy  infrastructure  keystone-xl  hydraulic-fracturing  tax-policy  budget  ethanol  exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 13, 2013

Bloomberg Poll: 56 Percent Say Keystone XL Would Help U.S. Energy Security

Bloomberg Businessweek: More Americans view the Keystone XL oil pipeline as a benefit to U.S. energy security than as an environmental risk, even as they say Canada should do more to reduce greenhouse gases in exchange for approval of the project.

A Bloomberg National Poll shows support for the $5.4 billion link between Alberta’s oil sands and U.S. Gulf Coast refineries remains strong, with 56 percent of respondents viewing it as a chance to reduce dependence on oil imports from less reliable trading partners. That compares with the 35 percent who say they see it more as a potential source of damaging oil spills and harmful greenhouse gas emissions.

Read more: http://buswk.co/1gwdBJq

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jobs  economy  environment  american-energy  hydraullic-fracturing  keystone-xl  manufacturing 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 9, 2013

Why Obama Should Thank the Oil and Natural Gas Industry

National Journal (Amy Harder): The oil and natural-gas industry probably won't ever get a thank-you card from President Obama, but he has a few big reasons to be grateful for the fossil-fuel boom.

America's vast resources of oil and natural gas have enabled Obama to move forward on aggressive policies, including tougher environmental rules and Iranian oil sanctions, which he would not have been able to do nearly as effectively without them.

The International Energy Agency predicts the U.S. will surpass Saudi Arabia as the world's biggest oil-producer in 2015; and, by the end of this year, the Energy Information Administration says we'll surpass Russia as the biggest natural-gas producer.

"I've joked before that for the last 30 years, our national energy policy has been implicitly predicated on a low-cost, trustable supply of natural gas," said Jason Grumet, president of the Bipartisan Policy Center, who advised Obama in his transition to the presidency in 2008. "It is incredibly fortunate that it showed up in time."

Read more: http://bit.ly/1aP7BDD

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american-energy  energy-security  economy  jobs  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  keystone-xl 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 19, 2013

America Needs its Shale Energy and Hydraulic Fracturing Provides It

The Hill:  In just a few short years, the United States has become the world’s number one oil and natural gas producer, and is well on its way to no longer relying on energy from countries that are historically hostile to U.S. interests.

For the average family last year, this energy transformation meant $1,200 in the form of lower energy bills, at a time when hard working American families desperately need a break. The benefits of the shale energy revolution have already been tremendous. On top of lowering costs for fueling our cars, heating our homes and running our factories, it may have saved America from slipping into a depression. After all, natural gas producing shale is the single most dramatically expanding part of the U.S. economy supporting the highest number of new jobs.
 
Energy is not an end unto itself; it is a key economic input to a more prosperous future for all Americans. If not for the shale revolution, we would not be reaping the benefits of the rebirth of the manufacturing sector that both of our parties see as key to rebuilding our economy. One recent study concluded that U.S. has added over 500,000 manufacturing jobs since the shale revolution began.
 
This shale revolution is completely dependent on two consistently improving American technologies: hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling. Without these two key technologies, all of the benefits we all experience every day would stop, our domestic energy resources would remain off limits from U.S. citizens, and the manufacturing jobs rebirth will end. 

Read more: http://bit.ly/If4fCM

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innovation  jobs  manufacturing  american-energy  keystone-xl  groundwater-protection 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 7, 2013

CLEVELAND -- U.S. Steel Corp. is expanding its Lorain steel tube plant to make pipes for natural gas companies.


Read more: http://on.wkyc.com/1b6PXyW

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american-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  innovation  technology  keystone-xl  ethanol  biofuels 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 4, 2013

The Outsiders Who Saw Our Economic Future

Wall Street Journal: The experts keep getting it wrong. And the oddballs keep getting it right.

Over the past five years of business history, two events have shocked and transformed the nation. In 2007 and 2008, the housing market crumbled and the financial system collapsed, causing trillions of dollars of losses. Around the same time, a few little-known wildcatters began pumping meaningful amounts of oil and gas from U.S. shale formations. A country that once was running out of energy now is on track to become the world's leading producer.

What's most surprising about both events is how few experts saw them coming—and that a group of unlikely outsiders somehow did. Federal Reserve chairmen Alan Greenspan and Ben Bernanke failed to foresee the financial meltdown. Top banking executives were stunned, and leading investors such as Bill Gross, Jim Chanos and George Soros didn't fully anticipate the downturn.

 

Read more: http://on.wsj.com/172n4PZ

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