The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  oil-and-natural-gas-production  economic-growth  carbon-dioxide-emissions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 29, 2016

A quick list of some of the benefits realized by the United States thanks to modern hydraulic fracturing and advanced horizontal drilling:

Surging oil and natural gas production

The United States is the world’s leading producer of oil and natural gas, resulting in lower oil imports and an opportunity for the U.S. to compete with other producers in the global market.

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, oil production from safely fractured wells totaled more than 4.3 million barrels per day in 2015, about half of all U.S. oil output.

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hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  oil-and-natural-gas-development  economic-benefits 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 7, 2016

You know, because of the broad benefits of the U.S. energy revolution – including higher domestic production, more energy security, lower costs for consumers and manufacturers – energy as an issue hasn’t been the kind of election-year focal point it might be if the country instead was staring at energy scarcity, higher costs and growing insecurity in the world – basically, America’s energy reality before the shale energy revolution launched by safe hydraulic fracturing and modern horizontal drilling.

That’s fine. We gladly welcome the new energy reality: America as the world’s No. 1 oil and natural gas producer, consumers with more disposable income thanks to lower gasoline and energy costs and businesses looking to locate and expand in the United States because abundant, more affordable energy.

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hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  oil-and-natural-gas-production  safe-operations  regulation 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted February 17, 2016

America’s status as the world’s leading producer of oil and natural gas is delivering major benefits to U.S. families and businesses. Production increases have ensured a stable supply of affordable, reliable energy, helping drive down prices for gasoline, electricity and home heating. Carbon emissions have also dropped – to near 20-year lows – thanks to abundant supplies of clean-burning natural gas.

It’s all possible due to hydraulic fracturing and advances in horizontal drilling. According to the Energy Department, at least 2 million oil and natural gas wells have been hydraulically fractured in this country, including up to 95 percent of new wells that account for more than 43 percent of U.S. oil production and 67 percent of its natural gas production.

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hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  safe-operations  epa34  water-supplies  oil-and-natural-gas-production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 20, 2016

Last week we made the point that America’s ongoing energy revolution is the main reason the United States is the world’s leading producer of oil and natural gas – a renaissance that is reducing oil imports and benefiting consumers in the form of lower prices at the pump. The same energy surge also is a leading reason the U.S. is leading the world inreducing carbon pollution.

These points argue for sustaining and growing domestic production – instead of trying to “transition away” from it, as the president said during last week’s State of the Union address. Turning our backs on vast public oil and gas resources – instead of safely developing them – would throw away a generational opportunity to strengthen America’s energy security, lift the economy, help U.S. consumers and aid friends overseas. It’s a shortsighted approach – especially when the U.S. model of increased domestic production, economic growth and emissions reduction is already working.

Safe, responsible hydraulic fracturing is the engine of America’s energy revolution. 

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natural-gas-production  consumption  electricity  fracking  lng-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 11, 2016

A couple of data points from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) that help illustrate the impact of the natural gas portion of the American energy revolution.

First, EIA reports that wholesale electricity prices at major trading hubs, on a monthly average for on-peak hours, were down 27 percent to 37 percent across the U.S. in 2015 compared to 2014. The reason for the decrease, EIA says, is lower natural gas prices. 

Now, let’s zero in on the increasing affordability of natural gas in electricity generation. Recently, EIA reported that 2015 natural gas spot prices at the national benchmark Henry Hub averaged $2.61 per million Btu (MMBtu), the lowest annual average since 1999. Interestingly, declining prices did not result in lower production, EIA says.

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consumer-products  natural-gas-benefits  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted December 22, 2015

What would the holidays be without energy? Sure, you could still roast your chestnuts – provided you had an open fire. And you still might find your way around on a dark, foggy night – with help from a certain reindeer. But in many cities and towns things would be significantly less jolly and less festive, even if it looked like snow.

Enter energy – and more specifically, natural gas.

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analysis  hydraullic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  fracking  water  energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 23, 2015

A new EnergyFromShale.org video shows the relatively tiny amount of water needed to develop U.S. energy with safe hydraulic fracturing – the chief reason (along with advanced horizontal drilling) that the United States now is the world’s No. 1 producer of oil and natural gas

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news  energy-exports  fracking  oil-and-natural-gas-development  russia  regulation  saudi-arabia 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 7, 2015

Roll Call (Reps. Joe L. Barton and Henry Cuellar)The advantages of lifting the ban on crude oil exports are not just theoretical talking points discussed in the halls of Congress, but rather supported by a large and growing body of research by government agencies, academic institutions and think tanks across the political spectrum. The latest is a study released by the Harvard Business School and the Boston Consulting Group. It highlights the obvious benefits lifting the ban will have on American families and businesses, our economy and global allies.

The study discusses the changing U.S. energy landscape and the opportunities made possible by America’s new energy abundance. The fear of a crippling dependence on foreign oil that existed in the 1970s, when the export ban was put in place, is no longer applicable today. In fact, the U.S. is now the world’s top petroleum producer largely due to our recent ability to produce oil and natural gas from shale formations. The world has changed drastically in the past 40 years and it is time for our policies to accurately reflect the current conditions in which we now live. We must embrace the United States’ new leading role on the world energy stage and recognize the value it would create in our everyday lives.

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news  safe-operations  fracking  epa34  shale-energy  keystone-xl  alaska  ozone  oil-and-natural-gas-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 6, 2015

USA Today (editorial)Fracking — the practice of cracking open underground oil and gas formations with water, sand and chemicals — has rescued U.S. energy production from a dangerous decline. Any debate about banning it should take a hard look at what that would cost the nation and at facts that aren't always part of the discussion.

Those facts are spelled out in a recent report from the Environmental Protection Agency on fracking and groundwater. One of the harshest charges against fracking, often leveled with apocalyptic intensity by its foes, is that it indiscriminately contaminates vital drinking water supplies.

The EPA's timely report essentially said that's overblown.

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news  american-energy  innovation  investment  fracking  shale-energy  manufacturing 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 25, 2015

CNN (Petraeus and Bhayani) – Fracking. 3D printing. Personalized medicine. Big data.

Each is a compelling technological trend. And taken together, advances in energy production, manufacturing, life sciences and IT amount to four interlocking revolutions that could make North America the next great emerging market -- as long as policymakers in this country don't impede their potential.

The impact of these four revolutions is already evident in the enviable economic position enjoyed by Canada, Mexico and United States compared with the rest of the world.

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