The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

keystone-xl-pipeline  energy-policy  energy-exports  domestic-oil-production  oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 14, 2014

More on the growing discussion of how North America’s energy renaissance – led by surging oil and natural gas production – affects U.S. energy and national security and gives our country the chance to positively impact global stability. A part of that conversation is the significant role the Keystone XL pipeline could play in securing our energy future, allowing our country to have greater influence abroad.

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energy-policy  doe34  jack-gerard  lng-exports  global-markets  natural-gas  liquefied-natural-gas  us-chamber-of-commerce  russia 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 5, 2014

Politico reports (sub req'd) that the Energy Department plans to stick with its “case-by-case” approach to approving natural gas export projects – even as some policymakers say speeding up the process would send a strong signal that the United States is  a leader in global energy markets, expanding its ability to broaden supply options and defuse energy-related standoffs like the one playing out between Russia and Ukraine.

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american-energy  energy-security  energy-policy  fracking  exports  keystone-xl-pipeline  taxes 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 23, 2014

What The Captain & Tennille Teach Us About Energy Policy

Forbes: Love apparently didn’t keep the ’70s pop duo Captain & Tennille together.Toni Tennille has filed for divorce from Daryl Dragon after 39 years of marriage. Just as the pair’s most famous standard now rings false, so does our 1970′s notion of energy security. For the past 40 years, U.S. energy policy has been married to the idea of scarcity. Following the oil embargoes of the 1970s, we built policies, from export bans to ethanol mandates, based on the idea that we would forever be at the mercy of other oil-producing nations.

The hydraulic fracturing boom, however, has changed all that. North America is undergoing an energy renaissance. Domestic crude oil production has reached parity with imports, and the International Energy Agency predicts the U.S. may become the world’s largest energy producer as early as next year. Yet our policies remain stuck in the dark ages of scarcity. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle are resisting efforts to lift the 1970s-era ban on crude exports, citing issues of “energy security.”

As Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., told the Wall Street Journal: “If we overturn decades of law and send our oil to China and other markets, oil companies might make more money per barrel, but it will be American consumers and our national security that will pay the price.”

There’s a difference between ensuring our energy security and hoarding resources. With our newfound abundance, security comes through continued development of domestic reserves.

Read morehttp://onforb.es/KMM7kV

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american-energy  energy-policy  imports  keystone-xl-pipeline  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 22, 2014

Major Economies’ Reliance on Oil and Natural Gas Imports Projected to Change Rapidly 

Changing Import Reliance

EIA Today in Energy: The 2014 Annual Energy Outlook projects declines in U.S. oil and natural gas imports as a result of increasing domestic production from tight oil and shale plays. U.S. liquid fuels net imports as a share of consumption is projected to decline from a high of 60% in 2005, and about 40% in 2012, to about 25% by 2016. The United States is also projected to become a net exporter of natural gas by 2018.

Conversely, other major economies are likely to become increasingly reliant on imported liquid fuels and natural gas. China, India, and OECD Europe will each import at least 65% of their oil and 35% of their natural gas by 2020—becoming more like Japan, which relies on imports for more than 95% of its oil and gas consumption.

The reasons for these shifts are different between emerging and developed economies. In China and India, oil demand growth from emergent middle classes will likely outpace domestic production, while OECD Europe will likely become more import reliant as a result of declining oil production in the North Sea.

Read more: http://1.usa.gov/1g1pCqW

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american-energy  energy-policy  fracking  environment  economy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 17, 2014

David Ignatius has an important column in the Washington Post this week on America’s energy boom –the result of greatly expanded domestic oil and natural gas production and an “all of the above” approach to energy policy. Ignatius writes:

For decades, Americans have talked about “energy policy” as if it were the political equivalent of a migraine. The phrase connoted pain — in ever-rising gas prices, costly government schemes and dependence on imports from precarious Middle East regimes. But recent developments involving energy production and technology have been so astonishing that they should puncture this long-running pessimism. The amazing fact is that, on nearly every front, America’s energy prospects have improved in ways that would have been unimaginable just a decade ago. In the energy marketplace, President Obama’s vision of an “all of the above” strategy is actually happening. Production of oil, gas and alternative energy is rising, even as demand begins falling for these energy sources — all thanks to new technology. The market forces driving these changes are so powerful that even politicians probably can’t screw them up.

Ignatius highlights data we’ve previously seen from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), projecting that the U.S. will produce nearly 9.6 million barrels of oil per day by 2016, a level not seen since 1970 – thanks largely to vast shale deposits and advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling.

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job-creation  oil-and-natural-gas-development  economic-growth  energy-policy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 8, 2014

Below is a video clip from API President and CEO Jack Gerard’s State of American Energy speech this week, detailing strong support from Americans for increased production of U.S. oil and natural gas – because this development translates into millions of good jobs.

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energy-policy  fracking  innovation  technology  renewable-fuel-standard 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 6, 2014

Fracking 101: Breaking Down the most Important Part of Today’s Oil, Gas Drilling

Greeley Tribune:  Fracking, the two- to three-day process of hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas, is perhaps one of the most misunderstood drilling practices, becoming as bad of a word in some circles as a racial slur.

 

Entire countries have banned the process. Some Colorado towns have placed moratoriums to study it further.

Environmentalists storm capitals over it, demanding increased regulations, and oil and gas company employees and officials scratch their heads — they’ve been using the same process in oil and gas drilling for 60 years without widespread incidents.

 

“It’s a perplexing issue,” said Collin Richardson, vice president of operations for Mineral Resources Inc., who opened up a company fracking job last fall to a student tour from the University of Northern Colorado. “People go to a light switch and expect energy to be there, but they don’t think about where it comes from. I don’t think most people understand that without hydraulic fracturing, we wouldn’t have natural gas to provide electricity to our homes or gas in our cars.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1gc41Z7

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energy-policy  exports  american-energy  fracking  new-york-drilling-moratorium  keystone-xl-pipeline  arctic 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 2, 2014

Shale-Oil Boom Puts Spotlight on Crude Export Ban

Wall Street Journal: The U.S. government virtually banned the export of crude oil in the wake of the mid-1970s energy crisis. But as America pumps more crude, 2014 could be the year those constraints are lifted.

For decades, even discussing the possibility of exporting domestic oil was a political nonstarter in Washington. Now, surging U.S. production has led to the beginning of a glut along the Gulf Coast, home to the largest refinery complex in the world. Too much crude is driving down prices there, making producers eager to export some of their oil to places like Europe where prices are higher.

Read more (subscription publication): http://on.wsj.com/1d2nGfN

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american-energy  energy-security  jobs  economy  energy-policy  exports  fracking 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 30, 2013

Vaclav Smil’s Graph of the Year: The Natural Gas Boom

Washington Post: "[There are] too many choices possible, but here is one epoch-making trend: as the post-2008 rise of hydraulic fracturing drove U.S. natural gas prices down and increased the supply (in 2013 the U.S. will be again the world’s largest natural gas producer) oil and gas prices, traditionally moving in tandem, have diverged significantly. History is being made."

Crude and Natural Gas

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energy-policy  policy  energy-security  keystone-xl-pipeline  biofuels  rfs34  hydraulic-fracturing  exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted November 20, 2013

Future of U.S. Energy Production is Bright

KAAL ABC Rochester 6:  The U.S. is entering a new era of energy production said former national security advisor General James Jones who made a stop in Rochester Tuesday. He says the future of U.S. energy is bright.

Most people have noticed a change when they go to fill up.

"Gas being $3.20 instead of $3.80," said Scott Heck.

Rochester Area Chamber of Commerce member Scott Heck knows a lot more is happening with the U.S. energy industry than what we can see at the gas pump.

"Certainly being from North Dakota I know people that have been dramatically affected by the abundance of energy up there," said Heck.

North Dakota is just one of the areas that has seen the effects of the U.S. oil boom.

"The U.S. is now the largest producer of oil and gas," said General Jones.

General Jones is a former national security advisor to President Obama. He say with recent innovations and technologies the United States is now in a position where it may soon no longer have to rely on foreign oil.

"This is a whole different ball game, we need to develop our resources widely, this energy leverage gives us a role of influence in the world that we haven't enjoyed for a long time," said General Jones.

Read more: http://bit.ly/18QwkqR

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