The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

west-virginia  vote4energy  natural-gas  fracking  climate  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 30, 2016

Used to be, when you thought of West Virginia and energy, you thought of coal. Indeed, West Virginia remains a big coal producer, ranking No. 2 in the country (behind Wyoming) in 2014 U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) statistics. But the U.S. energy renaissance – driven by advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling – has the state’s natural gas production skyrocketing, with benefits to the state and the entire country.

Read More

natural-gas  climate  offshore-energy  virginia  access  emission-reductions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 17, 2016

Politicians’ issue positions are scribbled in sand, not granite, right? But here’s one that shouldn’t shift one bit – whether you’re a Democrat, Republican, an Independent or whatever: support for domestic natural gas and the hydraulic fracturing that’s producing record volumes of it. Thanks to fracked natural gas the United States leads the world in reducing carbon emissions, we're more energy secure and consumers are benefiting. No issue is more bipartisan than American-made energy – the natural gas and oil that primarily fuel our economy and our modern lifestyles, brought to us all by safe, responsible fracking.

Read More

natural-gas  climate  emission-reductions  renewable-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 15, 2016

I really like this quote from Chris Mooney’s analysis in the Washington Post last week – the speaker being Italian scientist Elena Verdolini, whose new research basically finds that solar and wind energy need big help from natural gas:

“If you have an electric car, you don’t need a diesel car in your garage sitting there. But in the case of renewables, it’s different, because if you have renewable electricity and that fails, then you need the fast acting gas sitting in your garage, so to speak.”

Read More

natural-gas  fracking  emission-reductions  climate  vote4energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 11, 2016

Thanks to fracking, the United States has reduced CO2 emissions to levels not seen in more than two decades, allowing the U.S. to lead the world in that important climate category – as it leads the world in oil and natural gas production. Around the globe there’s a lot of talk about making climate progress; the United States is actually achieving that progress, and it is doing so without sacrificing jobs, economic growth, energy security or consumer affordability.

Read More

vote4energy  climate  natural-gas  emission-reductions  democrats 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 27, 2016

Thanks largely to increased use of domestic natural gas, U.S. energy-related carbon emissions in 2015 were 12 percent lower than they were in 2005 – even though the economy last year was 15 percent larger than it was a decade before. EIA says the carbon drop is mostly because of changes in the electric power sector, where natural gas has become the leading fuel for generation. EIA reports that CO2 emissions from electricity generation were the lowest since 1993:

The larger point is one we’ve made a lot lately – that while there’s a lot of talk about the need to advance climate goals, the United States already is doing it with a big assist from abundant, affordable domestic natural gas. It’s a model that is working, even as the U.S. develops more energy here at home and as our economy grows.

The U.S. leads the world in reducing carbon emissions, which is a win in anyone’s book.

Read More

vote4energy  us-energy-security  oil-and-natural-gas  innovation  investment  economic-growth  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 20, 2016

Because of vast energy reserves and the advanced technologies and expertise to safely develop them, the United States’ energy future looks promising and secure. America continues to lead the world in oil and natural gas production, which is critically important for a future in which both are projected to remain the leading fuels supporting our economy and modern way of living. Energy security, in increasing measure, is in our hands … if.

If we make the right energy policy choices, and if we select leaders who will advance those policies. If we safely harness America’s energy wealth, if we foster the private investment and innovation that launched the ongoing energy revolution – if we do all these things, there’s no reason the United States can’t benefit from secure energy far into the future.

In this election year we should identify visionary leaders on energy issues – those who see and grasp the historic opportunity provided by surging domestic oil and gas production and also the actions needed to keep that production going. In that sense, energy can be a 2016 vote-decider.

Read More

climate  energy-policy  production  energy-security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 18, 2016

Energy-wise, it’s a great time to be an American. Be it providence or plain good luck, the United States is energy rich – with the technologies, industry expertise and experience to responsibly develop the energy Americans need every day to lead modern lives. The U.S. energy revolution comes at an opportune moment in our country’s history. Consider just some of the products of this good energy fortune…

Read More

natural-gas  climate  economic-growth  carbon-emissions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 13, 2016

John Holdren, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, had some important things to say at this week’s U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) conference – noting that fossil fuels will remain the world’s dominant energy for decades to come and that the idea of America leaving its oil and natural gas reserves in the ground is “unrealistic.” The first point is a fact-based projection by EIA. The second is a rational conclusion, given the first.

Now, on to something else from Holdren’s speech – his discussion of what he called the “energy-climate challenge.” Holdren:

“Without energy there is no economy, without climate there is no environment and without economy and environment there is no well-being, there’s no civil society, there’s no personal or national security, there’s no economic growth.”

The challenge – providing the energy we need in an environmentally responsible way – certainly is a complex task. The great news is the U.S. has found a model that provides both economic growth and advances climate goals: an abundant supply (thanks to fracking) of low-cost natural gas.

Read More

climate  economic-growth  electricity  energy  fossil-fuels  greenhouse-gas-emissions  energy-information-administration 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 11, 2016

The U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) annual energy conference is under way in Washington, D.C.  Here are a few highlights from the first slate of speakers, which included John Holdren, assistant to the president for science and technology, and Gregory Goff, Tesoro Corporation president and CEO.

Holdren went first, saying that the driver of technology in the future will be finding solutions to what he called the energy/climate challenge:

“Without energy there is no economy, without climate there is no environment and without economy and environment there’s no well-being, there’s no civil society, there’s no personal or national security, there’s no economic growth."

Read More

natural-gas  pipelines  climate  infrastructure  costs 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 1, 2016

When you see the significant economic, consumer and climate benefits to the U.S. from increased  use of natural gas, it’s quite a puzzle when some won’t take “yes” for an answer – yes to lower energy costs, yes to infrastructure jobs, yes to carbon emissions reductions. Unfortunately for Massachusetts residents, that’s the path the state legislature appears to be taking. More below. First, a review of how clean-burning natural gas is making life better across the rest of the country.

Let’s start with reduced household energy costs, which are helping to lower Americans’ cost of living, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). In constant 2015 dollars, EIA says average annual energy costs per household peaked at about $5,300 in 2008 then declined 14.1 percent in 2014.

Read More