The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

economy  jobs  energy-security  hydraulic-fracturing  engineers  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 23, 2013

Marcellus Shale Gas Growing Faster than Expected

Wall Street Journal: PITTSBURGH — Natural gas production from the Marcellus Shale region is growing faster than expected, according to a new federal report issued Tuesday.

Marcellus production has now reached 12 billion cubic feet a day, the Energy Information Administration report found. That's the energy equivalent of about 2 million barrels of oil a day, and more than six times the 2009 production rate.

For perspective, if the Marcellus Shale region were a country, its natural gas production would rank eighth in the world. The Marcellus now produces more natural gas than Saudi Arabia, and that glut has led to wholesale prices here that are about one-quarter of those in Japan, for example.
 
Read more: http://on.wsj.com/1cedUYl

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offshore-access  offshore-development  american-energy  economy  jobs  gulf-leases  revenue 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 22, 2013

Domestic oil and natural gas development is a key driver of America’s economy and global energy security, API’s director of upstream and industry operations Erik Milito told reporters yesterday. Access to offshore resources currently off-limits in the Atlantic, Pacific and Eastern Gulf of Mexico  could supply even more of the energy and jobs Americans need. Milito:

“Americans are eager to put more of our offshore energy resources to work. If exploration and development is allowed to safely expand to new areas, domestic oil and natural gas could provide more energy, jobs and government revenue than ever before.”

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hydraulic-fracturing  american-energy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 21, 2013

EIA to Release New Drilling Productivity Report 

Shale Oil and Natgas Growth


EIA Energy Today
: In the past few years, the United States has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas production from shale resources and oil production from shale and other tight resources. This game-changing development has resulted in a significant reduction in the price of natural gas in the United States, both in absolute terms and compared with prices in other major consuming countries, as well as a significant decline in U.S. dependence on imported petroleum. 

Recent U.S. production growth has centered largely in a few key regions and has been driven by advances in the application of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies. Given the importance of drilling productivity trends as a driver for future domestic production, EIA has been developing new approaches to assess the productivity of drilling operations.

Read more: http://1.usa.gov/17EV6d4

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american-energy  exports  global-energy  pipelines  ethanol  hydraulic-fracturing 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 18, 2013

Amid Oil Boom, Petroleum Exports Surge

National Journal: RICHMOND, Calif. – It takes about a month for oil to arrive from the Middle East to a refinery here on the edge of the San Francisco Bay. On a clear day, you can see the Golden Gate Bridge in the distance from the refinery's pier, but you will probably notice first and foremost the massive tankers docked and unloading oil into a web of pipes.

About 60 percent of the oil processed by this refinery, owned and operated by Chevron, comes from the Middle East. Most of the rest comes from Alaska, also by tanker. But the oil coming in is not as interesting as what is going out. Many companies are beginning to turn around and export the refined gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel.

"As the economy has taken a hit, as vehicle efficiency standards have lowered the demand for fuel, California refineries in aggregate can now produce more than the local demand and therefore products are beginning to be exported," said Dave Reeves, president of global supply and trading at Chevron.

Read more: http://bit.ly/H1RtaF

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hydraulic-fracturing  energy-security  american-energy  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 17, 2013

U.S. is the World’s Largest Producer of Natural Gas – Here’s What That Means  

NPR: Natural gas production in the U.S. is going through the roof. The U.S. now produces more natural gas than any country on Earth, according to a recent report from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

This is largely due to fracking, the controversial method for using pressurized fluids to break up rocks to get at the natural gas below. Over the past few years, fracking has had a huge effect on energy in America. Here's how.

Read more: http://n.pr/H6tGpA

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energy-markets  global-energy  energy-poicy  ethanol  renewable-fuel-standard  pennsylvania  jobs 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 16, 2013

U.S. Becomes World’s Top Oil Producer in 2013, Group Says

Bloomberg: The U.S. is expected to overtake Saudi Arabia as the world biggest total supplier of oil this year when natural gas liquids and biofuels are added to crude, PIRA Energy Group said.

 

The U.S. is projected to produce an average of 12.1 million barrels a day of liquids in 2013, 300,000 barrels a day higher than Saudi Arabia and 1.6 million more than Russia, according to data presented at PIRA’s Retainer Client Seminar Oct. 10 and Oct. 11 in New York.

 

The U.S. position has improved because of surging “shale oil” output, the New York-based energy consultant said. The combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, has unlocked supplies in shale formations in the central part of the country. Shale liquids output has climbed 3.2 million barrels a day in the last four years, the biggest gain since Saudi Arabia raised production between 1970 and 1974.

 

“This isn’t a big surprise but notable all the same,” said Michael Lynch, president of Strategic Energy & Economic Research in Winchester, Massachusetts. “This is another sign of the successful story that is horizontal drilling.”

 

Read more: http://bloom.bg/1fDiyzu

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american-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  pipelines  technology 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 15, 2013

Daniel Yergin: Out of ’73 Embargo ‘the Birth of the Modern Era of Energy’

Wall Street Journal: Forty years ago, on Oct. 17, 1973, the world experienced its first "oil shock" as Arab exporters declared an embargo on shipments to Western countries. The OPEC embargo was prompted by America's military support for Israel, which was repelling a coordinated surprise attack by Arab countries that had begun on Oct. 6, the sacred Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur.

 

With prices quadrupling in the next few months, the oil crisis set off an upheaval in global politics and the world economy. It also challenged America's position in the world, polarized its politics at home and shook the country's confidence.

 

Yet the crisis meant even more because it was the birth of the modern era of energy. Although the OPEC embargo seemed to provide proof that the world was running short of oil resources, the move by Arab exporters did the opposite: It provided massive incentive to develop new oil fields outside of the Middle East—what became known as "non-OPEC," led by drilling in the North Sea and Alaska.

 

Read more: http://on.wsj.com/18iHMi7

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hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  economy  american-energy  jobs  global-markets 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 14, 2013

Central Europe is a Ready market for U.S. Natural Gas

Washington Post: The global economy is still struggling to overcome the effects of the recession sparked by the 2008 financial crisis. But energy — in particular, shale gas exploration — has become one of the strongest engines for the U.S. economy.

U.S. natural gas production has increased by one-fourth in the past five years, according to the Energy Information Administration; it has created 600,000 jobs since 2009 and helped drive down gas prices for millions of Americans. Moreover, the United States is now in a position to export gas. This surplus creates opportunities for the United States to again be a geopolitical player in Europe.

While U.S. officials ponder their approach to Syria, the larger Middle East and Central Asia, they need look no farther than Central Europe and the “Visegrád Four” (Hungary, Poland, the Czech Republic and Slovakia) to find some of the United States’ most passionate allies. 

Read more: http://wapo.st/17039Xv  

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ethanol  blend-wall  renewable-fuel-standard  american-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 11, 2013

Analysis: Lawsuits Likely as EPA Declares U.S. Ethanol Blend Wall a ‘Reality’

Reuters: With two words, the U.S. environment regulator may be handing oil refiners the biggest win of a long battle to beat back the seemingly inexorable rise of ethanol fuel.

In a leaked proposal that would significantly scale back biofuel blending requirements next year, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) says the blend wall - the 10 percent threshold of ethanol-mixed gasoline that is at the crux of the lobbying war - is an "important reality".

The agency's rationale for a cut in the volume of ethanol that must be blended echoes an argument the oil industry has been making for months: the U.S. fuel chain cannot absorb more ethanol.

Read more: http://reut.rs/1hIy6OU

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environment  economy  hydraulic-fracturing  marcellus 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted October 10, 2013

U.S. Poised to Pass Russia as World’s Largest Petroleum Producer – and the Bakken is Helping Make That Happen

Dickinson Press: The U.S. is poised to pass Russia as the world’s top oil and gas producer, according to a new report, and North Dakota’s congressional delegation said they believe it is largely due to the state’s Bakken energy play.

Citing U.S. Energy Information Administration and International Energy Agency numbers, the Wall Street Journal reported last week that the U.S. is poised to overtake its former Cold War rival in the production of oil and natural gas sometime later this year.

Sen. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., on Wednesday joined Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., and Rep. Kevin Cramer, R-N.D., in citing North Dakota’s booming Bakken shale play — which also spills over into Montana and the Canadian province of Saskatchewan — as a key contributing factor.

Read more: http://bit.ly/GIcFSK

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