The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

energy-security  american-energy  imports  fracking  jobs  economy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 2, 2014

Total U.S. net imports of energy, measured in terms of energy content, declined in 2013 to their lowest level in more than two decades. Growth in the production of oil and natural gas displaced imports and supported increased petroleum product exports, driving most of the decline. A large drop in energy imports together with a smaller increase in energy exports led to a 19% decrease in net energy imports from 2012 to 2013.

Total energy imports declined faster—down 9% from 2012 to 2013—than in the previous year, while export growth slowed. Crude oil production grew 15%, about the same pace as in 2012, which led imports of crude oil to decrease by 12%, accounting for much of the overall decline in imports.

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economy  fracking  lng-exports  jobs  keystone-xl-pipeline  energy-security 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 1, 2014

With Europe’s dependence on Russian gas impeding diplomatic efforts, it’s time to reconsider outdated policies that are keeping the U.S. from becoming an energy exporter.

U.S. lawmakers don’t drive around in 1970s-era cars, yet they don’t seem to mind energy policies that are equally out of date. Attempts to export shale oil and gas, for example, have run smack into legal and regulatory barriers as old as a Gran Torino.

Energy companies have been urging Congress to lift the lid on exports and start treating oil and gas again like any other commodity that’s freely traded in world markets. Tapping global demand for U.S. shale oil and gas, they say, will spur domestic production and create even more jobs in a sector that’s already racked up robust employment gains.

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american-energy  energy-security  economy  jobs  fracking  texas  oklahoma  pennsylvania 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 31, 2014

Over the past few years, the U.S. has witnessed a dramatic turnaround in its energy situation. Thanks largely to a combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," energy producers have been able to tap vast oil and gas deposits buried in deep shale formations. As a result, domestic oil and gas production has surged to multi-decade highs.

This energy boom has yielded tremendous and widespread economic benefits to the United States. A statement from the White House Council of Economic Advisors last year summed it up nicely: "Every barrel of oil or cubic foot of gas that we produce at home instead of importing abroad means more jobs, faster growth, and a lower trade deficit." Let's take a closer look at some of the main ways the energy boom has helped the nation's economy.

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american-energy  fracking  jobs  lng-exports  manufacturing  texas  ohio 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 28, 2014

The nation's energy boom, stoked by technological advances both onshore and offshore, drove significant economic growth for the oil and gas industry, which also fueled a corresponding population boom in resource-rich areas such as North Dakota and Texas between 2007 and 2012, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

The bureau's Economic Census Advance Report, released Wednesday, provides the first comprehensive look at the U.S. economy since the Great Recession, supplying data on a series of key metrics across more than 1,000 industries. The report comes out every five years.

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economy  jobs  american-energy  fracking  global-energy  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 27, 2014

Associated Press: WASHINGTON -- America's cities are still growing, with the population boom fueled by people picking up and moving to find jobs in energy production across the oil- and gas-rich areas west of the Mississippi River.

New 2013 census information released Thursday shows that cities are the fastest-growing parts of the United States, and a majority of the metro areas showing that growth are located in or near the oil- and gas-rich fields of the Great Plains and Mountain West.

Neighboring cities Odessa and Midland, Texas, show up as the second and third fastest-growing metro areas in the country. Sara Higgins, the Midland public information officer, has a simple explanation: oil. "They're coming here to work," Higgins said.

Energy production is one of the fastest-growing industries in the United States, the Census Bureau said. The boom in the U.S. follows the use of new technologies, such as hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, to tap oil and gas reserves.

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economy  energy-efficiency  jobs  fracking  energy-security  exports  lng34 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 21, 2014

To Americans used to thinking of energy in terms of the Middle East, the names of the world's top producers of natural gas might come as a surprise.

 

No. 1 is the United States. No. 2 is Russia. Together they stand as the giants of gas production. What separates them is that the U.S. consumes its gas, while Russia has become the world's largest exporter — a key reason why President Vladimir Putin felt confident that he could seize Crimea from Ukraine and get away with it. Russia supplies 30% of Europe's gas needs, making it hard for European leaders to muster the resolve to resist.

 

The good news is that the West can turn the tables on Putin, freeing Europe from its dependency and in the process making Russia pay dearly. That can't be done fast enough to neuter the current crisis, nor will it come cheaply. But if Putin believes his actions will drive Europe toward energy independence, he'll have to think twice. Deprived of its biggest market, Russia's fragile, energy-based economy would erode, along with its power and Putin's stratospheric popularity.

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american-energy  economy  energy-efficiency  energy-security  environment  jobs  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 20, 2014

The U.S. shale boom is beginning to ripple outward to American cities.

The shale mining industry's rising demand for materials and equipment along with the abundance of cheap fuel are fueling a modest renaissance in American manufacturing, according to a report prepared by IHS Global insight for the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

The shale extraction industry is itself driving growth through its hunger for steel pipeline, extraction machinery and other materials needed at domestic shale deposits, including the Bakken in North Dakota and the Marcellus shale in Pennsylvania. The availability of cheap fuel has in turn allowed these energy intensive manufacturing industries to cut costs and compete better with foreign imports.

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american-energy  energy-security  economy  jobs  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline  global-markets 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 19, 2014

Carpe Diem Blog: US petroleum exports reached a new record high in 2013 at an average of more than 3.5 million barrels per day (bpd), which was almost double the 1.8 million bpd of petroleum exports in 2008. During his State of the Union address in January of 2010, President Obama promised that his administration would double US exports within five years. It’s becoming increasingly clear that it’s a completely unachievable goal, except for a few exceptions like petroleum products. But I don’t think we’ll be hearing about the doubling of petroleum exports from Team Obama. Fossil fuel based exports were probably the furthest thing from his mind when Obama made the fantasy promise to double America’s exports within five years.

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fracking  american-energy  economy  environment  energy-security  energy-efficiency  jobs  hydraulic-fracturing  innovation  technology 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 17, 2014

Happy birthday, fracking! What a fantastic, 65-year ride it has been – and here’s to another 65 years and more.

Advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling launched an oil and natural gas renaissance in this country – bringing dynamic job creation, economic stimulus that radiates well beyond the oil and natural gas industry proper and greater energy security. Thanks to fracking, the United States is an energy superpower that, with the right policies, can harness its vast resources to ensure a significantly better future for its citizens while reducing energy-related tension across the globe.

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innovation  manufacturing  jobs  economy  fracking  american-energy  global-energy 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted February 25, 2014

American Shale Gas and Tight Oil: Reshaping the Global Energy Balance

IHS Unconventional Energy Blog: The development of shale gas and tight oil in the United States constitutes an “unconventional revolution,” owing to its scale and speed. It is already having a profound global impact: upending energy markets, reshaping competitiveness in the world economy, and portending major shifts in global politics.

The unconventional revolution was born out of advances in two technologies. Hydraulic fracturing — or “fracking” — was introduced at the end of the 1940s. Efforts to apply this technique to dense shale in Texas began in the early 1980s. But it took two decades to perfect the combination of fracking and horizontal drilling that would drive the new boom. And it wasn’t until 2008 that these techniques began to have a major impact.

Since then, however, growth has been remarkable. Shale gas currently accounts for nearly half of U.S. natural gas production, and U.S. prices have fallen to one third of European levels and one-fifth of Asian levels. Tight oil, produced with the same techniques as shale gas, has led to a 60 percent rise in U.S. oil production since 2008. This increase of three million barrels per day is larger than the national output of nine of the 13 OPEC countries. The International Energy Agency predicts that the U.S. will soon overtake Saudi Arabia and Russia as the world’s largest oil producer.

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