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energy  keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 8, 2013

The folks at Oil Sands Fact Check have a new video that shows strong support for the Keystone XL pipeline from union members at a recent rally in Washington

Worth underscoring:

“The Keystone XL pipeline does not require an act of Congress; it does not require an appropriation.  It’s privately funded, it’s ready to go.  All it needs is one last permit and we go to work.”

Sean McGarvey, president, Building and Construction Trades Department (AFL-CIO)

 

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emissions  epa34  exports  gulf  hydraulic-fracturing  keystone-xl-pipeline  lng34 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted May 8, 2013

The AdvocateOur Views: Riches Await in the Gulf

The Baton Rouge, La., paper touts the energy potential in the Gulf of Mexico after Interior Secretary Sally Jewell’s recent visit to an offshore rig there. The editorial backs Jewell’s statement that “maintaining the public’s trust in the safety and environmental performance of oil and gas production is critically important as we continue to tap into the Gulf’s abundant resource potential.” 

TribLIVEHow’s the Economy? Looking Up

Washington County, Pa., leads the greater Pittsburgh region in terms of economic development projects, energy production and job creation – thanks to natural gas development and hydraulic fracturing. 

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hydraulic-fracturing  keystone-xl-pipeline  natural-gas  offshore-regulations 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted May 7, 2013

The Hill The Case for Keystone XL Goes Beyond Jobs and Energy Independence

In a guest column, Brigham McCown argues the benefits of  the Keystone XL pipeline would extend beyond  jobs and energy security to  safety. According to government statistics, pipelines are the safest way to transport energy supplies, writes McCown.

U.S. News and World ReportLawmakers: Natural Gas Exports Could Erode Political Might of U.S. Adversaries

U.S. News recaps today’s House Subcommittee on Energy and Power hearing, which focused on legislation that would expedite U.S. natural gas exports. Supporters  say shipping natural gas to allies could strengthen diplomatic ties, undermine political leverage of adversaries, while also shaving the U.S. trade deficit and creating jobs.

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economy-and-energy  keystone-xl-pipeline  oil-sands-pipeline  energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 1, 2013

Each of the State Department’s four reviews of the Keystone XL pipeline – during the more than four years the project has been under consideration – focused primarily on the Keystone XL’s impacts on the environment: air, ground and surface water, wetlands, vegetation, wildlife and more. State went beyond the Keystone XL itself, evaluating the environmental impact of oil sands crude that would be delivered through it – as well as the impacts on Canada.

Bottom line: Each review came to the same conclusion – the Keystone XL’s construction and operation will not significantly impact the environment. From the most recent State assessment, issued in March:

The analyses of potential impacts associated with construction and normal operation of the proposed Project suggest that there would be no significant impacts to most resources along the proposed Project route …

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keystone-xl-pipeline  fracking  gasoline-taxes  environmental-impact 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 30, 2013

BloombergApprove Keystone Now

Bloomberg’s editorial board argues that rather than encouraging more study on the Keystone XL pipeline, President Obama should “now prod the State Department to move as fast as possible” to approve the project.

AEI Carpe Diem BlogTexas Oil Output Continues

Mark J. Perry writes, “The exponential increase in Texas oil production over the last several years is nothing short of phenomenal, and is a direct result of … game-changing drilling technologies in America that have now revolutionized the nation’s production of shale oil.”

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energy  keystone-xl-pipeline  oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 25, 2013

The Keystone XL pipeline is squarely in President Obama’s court. He should approve the full project – for the jobs, economic lift and strengthened energy security this shovel-ready project would provide for our country. (Photo below by Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma)

KXL construction

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keystone-xl-pipeline 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 24, 2013

Let’s recap the economic reasons for construction of the full Keystone XL pipeline project, which has been waiting on the president’s approval for more than four years. According to the State Department’s most recent review Keystone XL would:

  • Create 42,100 average annual jobs across the United States over its one- to two-year construction period.
  • Generate $2.05 billion in employment earnings.
  • Result in $3.3 billion in direct spending on construction and materials.
  • Produce $65 million in short-term revenues for government from sales and use taxes in states that levy them.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  oil-sands 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 18, 2013

Listen to the pleas for approval of the full Keystone XL project – from people who’ve been waiting more than four years for the jobs and economic benefits construction of the pipeline would bring:

“We just want jobs. … A key part of the election was the economy. We need the jobs.”

“Delaying it any further is just harming the United States of America, and it’s harming the workers that are skilled and trained and ready to get to work.”

“Mr. President, I hope you stand behind your word and support labor, and you get behind the pipeline and you give American workers a job.”

“I’d have more money to support  my family, I’d have a better Christmas, I’d have a better life.”

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hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  keystone-xl-pipeline  natural-gas  revenue  taxes 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted April 15, 2013

The Hill Energy Taxes Are No Budget Solution

Steve Forbes writes on The Hill’s Congress Blog that higher taxes on the oil and natural gas industry would cost jobs, lower energy production and actually reduce revenue to government over time. He cites a study showing that “a new tax on the industry would sacrifice 170,000 direct and indirect energy jobs by 2014.”

Houston ChronicleIt’s Wrong to Penalize the Oil and Natural Gas Industry

“Singling out our oil and natural gas industry for taxation penalizes producers,” writes the newspaper. “Bad guys? You mean the folks who employ our neighbors in good-paying jobs, contribute mightily to our tax base, civic life and sports and cultural/arts scenes? We don't think so.”

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canadian-oil-sands  keystone-xl-pipeline  energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 12, 2013

To hear the other side, you’d think the Keystone XL pipeline project would be nearly 1,200 miles of all pain, no gain for the United States. No rewards? The U.S. State Department has reviewed the Keystone XL four times now and finds rewards aplenty. While Keystone XL opponents don’t like State’s fourth favorable analysis any more than they liked the previous three, they should pay attention nonetheless. Let’s go down the list:

Jobs: Opponents minimize the number and duration of Keystone XL-associated jobs. State says:

“Including direct, indirect, and induced effects, the proposed Project would potentially support approximately 42,100 average annual jobs across the United States over a 1-to 2-year construction period

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