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Energy Tomorrow Blog

states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 28, 2017

You remember “Lucy” and “Ricky” from “I Love Lucy,” one of the best TV sitcoms ever that’s still being seen on the Hallmark Channel. Once upon a time, in the film comedy “The Long, Long Trailer,” they set out on a road trip with a fully outfitted tow trailer about the length of Tennessee.

It’s still pretty funny stuff. For example, there’s a scene where she’s trying to fix a meal inside the bouncing, jouncing trailer while her husband happily belts out a ballad in the car, completely oblivious to his wife’s predicament in the rig behind him. And other gags.

Here’s the link between an old film comedy, trailers and energy: Every year, millions of Americans hit the roads towing trailers – and every mile is made better with the help of oil and natural gas. The link with Ohio is that Jackson Center in the Buckeye State, about 75 miles northwest of Columbus, is home to Airstream, maker of the classic, aluminum-clad travel trailer.

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states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 26, 2017

Heading down the Las Vegas Strip toward one of the town’s big-name attractions, the sights and sounds are just mesmerizing, the crowd’s energy adding to the excitement. At the show the view is as spectacular as the iconic neon lights of the city’s skyline. 

Musicians, illusionists and acrobats alike are decked out from head to toe in costumes that say out loud: There’s no such thing as too much glamour and extravagance in Las Vegas. The show’s a work of art of its own, seen in the performers’ elaborate face makeup. One’s decorated like a fierce warrior; another like a majestic animal. The shimmering makeup fits so well in a city that itself shimmers with color and light. Let’s look at the ways energy plays a role in makeup and cosmetic products – whether it’s putting the sparkle on a Vegas showgirl’s face or simply helping the rest of us look our best.

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power-past-impossible  states2017 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 20, 2017

In Birmingham, they may indeed love the governor (or so the song says), but in Alabama what they feel for college football – stretching from Mobile in the southwest corner of the state to Piedmont in the northeast – borders on insanity. College football might not be religion in these parts, but it’s pretty doggone close.

The first rite of service on football Saturdays is the tailgate. Before “War Eagle!” is heard inside Jordan-Hare Stadium or “Ro-o-o-o-oll Tide!” echoes in Bryant-Denny, the football acolytes observe special pregame rituals – food, drink and the most raucous reverie you’ll find under a canopy. Think of it as an outdoor party with tens of thousands of your closest friends. Whether on The Plains at Auburn or the Quad in Tuscaloosa, energy helps set the game day stage.

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states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 13, 2017

More than 16 million U.S. households own motorcycles. It’s an energy-filled joyride that’s more about the getting there than the being there. Energy makes each cycling mile quicker, faster, yet safer – helping riders become a little more present, more adrenalized, a little more alive. Indeed, that fairly describes energy’s role in modern life: supporting, empowering, improving.

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states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 29, 2017

The pro tennis U.S. Open getting under way this week in Queens, N.Y., is more than a sporting event. It’s a living museum, too. The hollowly thwack of racket hitting ball, echoing in the hard-court canyon of Arthur Ashe Stadium, conjures memories of past greats like Ashe and Billie Jean King, Jimmy Connors, Chris Evert, Roger Federer and many others. All authored key chapters to their legends at the open, many doing so under the lights at Flushing Meadow, where summer often gives way to fall during the tournament’s fortnight.

The U.S. Open is lightning-fast asphalt courts, power tennis and epic, late-night matches that stretch to five sets. It’s also energy – energy that makes tennis today a much improved game and spectator event compared to the tennis when Richard Sears won the first open in 1881, no doubt looking something like the image here.

Better rackets, better shoes, better playing surfaces and conditions – better tennis wear (sorry, Richard) – all assisted by contributions from natural gas and oil. America’s energy abundance supports virtually every aspect of modern living – work, home life, health and recreation – including tennis.

The Arthur Ashe Stadium, the open’s home the past 20 years, illustrates. The stadium’s retractable roof lets matches continue even in inclement weather. When it’s raining outside, more than 22,000 who fill the stadium can thank natural gas for keeping them and the tennis dry.

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states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 24, 2017

With food kings Heinz, Utz, Herr’s, Kunzler and brewer Yeungling all headquartered in Pennsylvania, you’d think the summer cookout was invented in the Keystone State. With that group you’ve got your dogs, chips, pretzels, ketchup and beer – and more. All that’s left is to fire up the grill.  

Energy handles the grilling part: propane from a tank or maybe a natural gas feed. Yet, products made from or with oil and natural gas contribute greatly to the feast in other, under-appreciated ways. Which is energy’s role: making modern life fresher, tastier, more convenient and more enjoyable – often without us noticing it very much. Let’s talk about how energy facilitates a great American summer tradition.

Pennsylvania is the perfect setting for cooking outdoors. Tourists flock there to take in the state’s rich history. Pittsburgh and Philadelphia offer a long list of things to see and do, as do the places in between. Catch a Pirates game at PNC Park, or if you’re in Philly, grab a cheesesteak downtown or a drink with some friends at Spruce Street Harbor. But it’s hard to beat a cookout in August.

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states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 17, 2017

The list of names of American Automobiles Past is as long as your arm – the inaugural era of U.S. auto manufacturing was a burst of entrepreneurship that included more than 1,800 carmakers, almost all of them defunct today. Brands like Hudson (1909-1954), Packard (1899-1956), Pierce Arrow (1901-1938) and others are the car ghosts of the past – though not completely gone and hardly forgotten.

These iconic brands and many more that helped define the golden age of car travel will be the stars this weekend in one of the country’s biggest classic car shows, the Woodward Dream Cruise, scheduled to roll down Woodward Avenue from suburban Pontiac, Mich., to downtown Detroit. Some 1.5 million people and 40,000 classic cars are expected. Energy will be there as well – in the fuel, lubrication and rubber need to keep the wheels  turning.

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states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 15, 2017

The last lines of Frank X. Gaspar’s poem, “Quahogs,” which appeared in New Yorker magazine last year, suggest a savory meal. Imagine a deep, stainless steel kettle, contents bubbling lazily on the stove in the kitchen – natural gas, preferably. In the next room friends seat themselves around a table as the sound of waves tumbling onto the beach pours through doors that open to the Atlantic Ocean.

Wait – What the heck’s a “quahog?”

In Rhode Island places like Quonochontaug, Weekapaug and Narragansett, it’s pronounced “co-hogs,” and they’re clams – the stars in a New England staple: clam chowder.  Indeed, ask a Rhode Islander what their state is known for, and there’s a good chance they’ll say “quahogs” (or “coffee milk”). Clamming – the actual foraging for clams in the sand just as the waves retreat from the beach – and eating them is a pastime for both locals and summer visitors. Energy makes it better – both the clamming and the eating.

Rhode Island’s clam chowder simply is a must for travelers to the nation’s smallest state. If you’re asked whether Rhode Island chowder is the red or the white, say neither. It’s a mixture of quahogs, potatoes, onions, butter, clam juice, water and spices – cooked over a natural gas stove indoors or an outdoor cooker at a clambake. It’s the quintessential summer dish in homes and restaurants across the state. For many in the Newport area, it’s the annual Great Chowder Cook-Off in early June that kicks off the season for this delicious treat.

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states2017  power-past-impossible 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 10, 2017

Don’t know about you, but if I’m anywhere near Des Moines the next couple of weeks, I’m headed to the Iowa State Fair – mainly, to gawk at the famed Butter Cow. Just have to. Imagine 600 pounds of low-moisture, pure-cream Iowa butter, slathered on an internal frame and sculpted, with precision, into a life-size, yellowy cow.

Six hundred pounds is lot of pats of butter – enough for 19,200 slices of toast, which, according to the fair’s website, would take a person two lifetimes to consume. (There are probably a couple of guys down at the pie-eating contest who might try to prove that false.) The Iowa State Fair has an official butter sculptor, Sarah Pratt, who has been at it the past nine years. The Butter Cow might not be Michelangelo, but in Iowa, it’ll do just fine – a big part of the sights and sounds of America’s quintessential state fair, right?

Sounds like a “yes.”

We mention the Butter Cow and all of the other attractions and activities at the fair to make the point that this piece of Americana and others like it are big energy events. The fair’s foods, displays, contests, rides and more – all use energy to bring off an event that continues to thrive long after it got the star treatment in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s 1945 film musical, “State Fair.” The Iowa State Fair is the largest annual event in the state, drawing about 1 million visitors.  

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