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keystone-xl-pipeline  canada  economic-benefits  infrastructure  state-department  president-obama 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted January 8, 2015

With legislation to advance the long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline moving ahead in the Senate, potentially attracting a misguided veto from President Obama, some important numbers:

76 – The number of months Keystone XL has been blocked by the Obama administration. Historically, approvals for cross-border pipeline projects take 18 to 24 months. Keystone XL’s history is something quite different – the story of how a shovel-ready infrastructure project was needlessly hijacked by politics.

830,000 – The number of barrels of North American oil per day that would flow through Keystone XL to U.S. refineries on the Gulf Coast, the vast majority of which would be turned into valuable fuel products.

42,100 – The number of U.S. jobs that would be supported during Keystone XL’s construction. That’s not industry’s number. That’s the number coming from President Obama’s own State Department. When he and others dismiss the project’s jobs impact, it reveals a serious lack of understanding of the way large infrastructure construction creates a positive ripple across the economy in terms of direct jobs, indirect jobs and induced jobs – all of which the White House fully appreciated when it was making the case for its federal stimulus package in 2009.   

5 – The number of Keystone XL environmental reviews conducted by President Obama’s own Department of State.

5 – The number of State Department environmental reviews that have concluded Keystone XL would have no significant climate impact.

2 – The number of Pinocchios just awarded by the Washington Post’s Fact Checker to claims that Keystone XL will negatively impact the environment and that it would only be only a conduit for oil to be shipped overseas. (This follows the Three Pinocchios given to President Obama last fall for saying oil transported by Keystone XL would go “everywhere else” but the U.S. Bottom line, that’s a lot of Pinocchios.)

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keystone-xl-pipeline  poll  economic-security  us-economy  energy  oil-sands  natural-gas  president-obama  state-department  congress  canada 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 7, 2014

A new Washington Post/ABC News poll on the Keystone XL pipeline adds to the drumbeat of strong public support for building the pipeline. The Post/ABC survey shows a nearly 3 to 1 margin, with 65 percent saying Keystone XL should be approved.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  ghg-emissions  state-department  oil-sand-production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted February 6, 2014

The folks at the Energy Collective hosted an interesting webchat discussion of the Keystone XL pipeline the other day, a good part of which focused on greenhouse gas emissions from the project and oil sands development – identified by President Obama as a key basis for his pipeline decision.

The big takeaway here: Even at the high end of estimates in the State Department’s latest Keystone XL environmental review, emissions would be a tiny fraction of global totals – hardly proving that the project would significantly exacerbate climate change.


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economy  energy-101  environment  jobs-and-economy  keystone-xl  oil-sands  pipeline  state-department 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted June 28, 2013

Raise your hand if you’ve played “Whack-A-Mole,” the old staple of arcades and carnivals, where the object is bopping the heads of mechanical varmints with a padded mallet as they rapidly and randomly pop up through multiple holes in the game table.

The concept pretty well captures tactics Keystone XL pipeline and Canadian oil sands opponents have used to help delay the Keystone XL, a shovel-ready project that would create tens of thousands of U.S. jobs, help grow our economy and make the U.S. more energy secure.

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access  canada  energy-policy  gasoline  gulf-of-mexico  keystone-xl  oil-sands  state-department 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted February 25, 2011

The U.S. State Department is evaluating a permit application to extend TransCanada's Keystone Pipeline to refineries in the U.S. Gulf Coast. If the project is approved, the pipeline would transport oil-sands derived oil from Alberta, Canada, to U.S. Gulf Coast refineries where it can be turned into products for American consumers. Although the pipeline has been on the drawing board for years, its importance to the United States is becoming clearer with every passing day. 

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canada  canadian-oil-sands  crude-oil  domestic-energy  energy-policy  gulf-of-mexico  keystone-xl  keystone-xl-pipeline  nebraska  oil-sands  refinery  state-department  energy-poicy 

Rayola Dougher

Rayola Dougher
Posted February 7, 2011

A few days ago in the midst of a blizzard on one of the coldest days of the year, members of the Construction and General Laborers Local 1140 met in Lincoln, Nebraska to rally in support of the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline and in opposition to state legislative proposals that would delay its construction.

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access  crude-oil  ghg34  greenhouse-gas-emissions  keystone-xl  keystone-xl-pipeline  oil-pipeline  oil-sands  pipeline-expansion  state-department 

Jane Van Ryan

Jane Van Ryan
Posted October 22, 2010

The debate over oil sands has taken a new political twist with a U.S. Senator asking whether the State Department will fairly consider a pipeline expansion project that could bring more Canadian crude oil to the United States. 

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