The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

analysis  transportation  crude-oil  federal-government  regulations  american-petroleum-institute  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 5, 2015

During months of public discussion of improving the safety of transporting crude oil by rail, we’ve stressed the need to let science and fact-based analysis guide development of a holistic strategy that would have the best chance of producing tangible safety benefits.

Unfortunately, new rules published last week by the Transportation Department – featuring requirements for sturdier tank cars and electronically controlled pneumatic (ECP) brakes – are a mixed bag that will do little to prevent derailments in the first place.

Instead of working to ensure the integrity of the tracks and to eliminate human error as much as possible, both of which would help prevent accidents from occurring, it seems federal officials at times opted for the optics of appearing to make progress. In the case of the ECP brakes, it’s a technology that experts say doesn’t significantly improve safety – which is the goal. To add to the 99.99 percent safety record in the transport of hazardous materials by rail, a more comprehensive approach that focuses more attention on prevention is needed.

Read More

jack-gerard  cera  infrastructure  keystone-xl-pipeline  oil-and-gas-industry  ozone-standards  renewable-fuel-standard  regulations 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 23, 2015

In a post earlier this month I suggested that the domestic energy surge – the government says the U.S. is No. 1 in the world in energy developed from oil and natural gas – is helping reduce oil imports and increasing U.S. energy security – and that it’s a big reason fewer than one in four Americans recently told Gallup they view the energy situation as “very serious.” Probably safe to say the other three are more or less comfortable with the country’s energy picture.  

Read More

american-energy  exports  economy  jobs  regulations  fracking  new-mexico  north-dakota  michigan 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted March 25, 2015

Rice University: Lifting the 40-year-old export ban on U.S. crude oil would have far-reaching effects on pricing, energy security and energy sector investment, according to new research from the Center for Energy Studies at Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy in Houston. The study, “The US Crude Oil Export Ban: Implications for Price and Energy Security,” was presented today at a news conference at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., by Kenneth Medlock, the center’s senior director and the paper’s author.

Read More

energy  regulations  fracking  jobs  exports  regulatory-system  economy  taxes 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted January 5, 2015

NPR: President Obama’s chief custodian of federal lands says local and regional bans on fracking are taking regulation of oil and gas recovery in the wrong direction. “I would say that is the wrong way to go,” Interior Secretary Sally Jewell told KQED in an exclusive interview. “I think it’s going to be very difficult for industry to figure out what the rules are if different counties have different rules.” In November, two California counties added themselves to a growing list of local bans on hydraulic fracturing. Voters approved measures in San Benito and Mendocino Counties by wide margins. “There are a lot of fears out there in the general public and that manifests itself with local laws or regional laws,” Jewell said.

Read More

american-energy  global-energy  global-markets  economy  fracking  new-york  jobs  keystone-xl-pipeline  regulations 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 22, 2014

Wall Street Journal: In early October, Saudi Arabia’s representative to OPEC surprised attendees at a New York seminar by revealing his government was content to let global energy prices slide. Nasser al-Dossary ’s message broke from decades of Saudi orthodoxy that sought to keep prices high by limiting global oil production, said people familiar with the session. That set the stage for Saudi Arabia’s oil mandarins to send crude prices tumbling late last month after persuading other members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries to keep production steady.

Read More

ozone-standards  emssions  epa34  regulations  kentucky 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 19, 2014

We’ve posted recently on potential roadblocks to the progress America’s energy revolution is providing – posed by administration policies and new regulatory proposals (infographic). Among them are proposed stricter standards for ground-level ozone that could put 94 percent of the country out of compliance, potentially impacting the broader economy and individual households.

Looking at the possible state-level effects of a more stringent ozone proposal in North CarolinaOhio and Louisiana reveals a clearer picture of potential impacts on Americans’ lives. Kentucky, already at the forefront of a coal-related regulatory push, could see significant economic harm from a new ozone standard, according to a National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) report.

Read More

regulations  epa-proposals  ozone-standards  refineries  rfs34  emissions 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 11, 2014

API has put together a new infographic that captures the breadth of this administration’s policies – especially an ongoing regulatory push from EPA – that could slow progress that’s being built on America’s energy revolution. (Click here to pull up the PDF.)

Here’s the thrust: The administration’s policies and regulatory efforts are hindering needed energy and economic progress. It is delaying infrastructure, such as pending liquefied natural gas export projects and the Keystone XL pipeline. It is sustaining the broken Renewable Fuel Standard and its ethanol mandates, which could negatively affect consumers and the larger economy. It’s threatening new regulation that would needlessly impact the refining sector, while advancing a stricter ozone standard that would put virtually the entire country out of compliance.

Read More

regulations  epa34  government 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 21, 2014

Eye-catching headline this week in The Hill: “EPA races to finish Obama rules.” First reaction: Haste makes waste – and when talking about regulation that could affect America’s dynamic, game-changing energy revolution, the goal should be sound policy, not speed. The Hill:

Officials at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are racing to churn out new regulations before the clock runs out on President Obama’s term. … Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle say they are concerned by the broad sweep of the EPA’s regulatory agenda, even though the agency says it is merely enacting the laws that Congress has passed. “I recognize that EPA has to do this, but I think EPA is sometimes stretching the limit too far in how aggressive they’ve been moving,” said Sen. Mark Begich (D-Alaska), who has distanced himself from the president’s environmental and energy policies as he runs for reelection in his energy-rich state.

Read More

american-energy  energy-security  jobs  fracking  hydraulic-fracturing  lng-exports  keystone-xl-pipeline  regulations 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 20, 2013

Merry Christmas, Texas, From Your Oil and Gas Industry

Forbes: “Texas has recovered 100 percent of the jobs lost during the recession and added 597,000 beyond the previous peak in August 2008.”   – Texas State Comptroller Susan Combs

On Thursday, December 12, the Texas Comptroller’s Office released a report detailing the current state of the state’s budget.  The report was titled “Tracking the Texas Economy – Key Texas Economic Indicators”.  But given the content of the report, a better title might have been:

“Merry Christmas, Texas, From Your Oil and Natural Gas Industry”

According to the Comptroller, the state ended its 2012-2013 biennium with a surplus of more than $2.6 billion, almost three times the previously projected amount of $964 million.  The reason why?  Because the Texas oil and natural gas industry’s tax payments were more than $2 billion more than anticipated.

Read more: http://onforb.es/1i8lWU5

Read More

american-energy  trade  deficit  jobs  economy  hydraulic-fracturing  fracking  regulations  lng-exports 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted December 4, 2013

A Pivotal Moment in U.S. Energy History

Global Energy Initiative (Jason Bordoff):  We are at a transformational moment in energy history. Just a few years ago, all energy projections forecast increased imports, increased scarcity, and increased natural gas prices. Today, we’ve shifted from scarcity to abundance. U.S. oil production has increased by 2.5 million barrels per day (B/D) since 2010. This year, the United States overtook Saudi Arabia as the largest producer of liquid fuels (including crude oil, natural gas, and biofuels) in the world. U.S. oil imports are at their lowest level in 25 years and are projected to continue declining. The natural gas outlook is even more striking. New geological surveys and production data continue to surprise to the upside. And multi-billion-dollar terminals proposed not long ago to import natural gas are being flipped to export instead.

This transformation is not only a U.S. story. New technologies mean that what were once challenging sources of oil and gas can now be tapped economically from the oil sands in Canada (and potentially Venezuela), the ultra-deepwater “presalt” off the coast of Brazil, and many other parts of the world. Iraq, parts of Africa, and elsewhere are poised for sharp increases in production.

Read more: http://bit.ly/1gk7ms9

Read More