The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

liquefied-natural-gas  lng-exports  economic-benefits  manufacturing  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 3, 2016

As is the case with any tradable commodity, selling U.S. natural gas outside this country promotes domestic jobs and economic growth. Expanding demand for U.S. natural gas in global markets through LNG exports will result in increased domestic investment, enhanced GDP growth, rising incomes and more well-paying jobs. At the same time, U.S. LNG exports will expand global natural gas markets – enhancing U.S. influence to encourage transparency and fair market rules while strengthening relationships with our allies.

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maryland  lng-exports  natural-gas  vote4energy  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 29, 2016

An all-of-the-above energy narrative is playing out in Maryland – as it is in the country at large. The United States is the world’s leading producer of oil and natural gas, fuels that are complemented by coal, nuclear, solar, wind and other renewable energy sources.  It’s an approach that serves the nation well and should be supported by pro-development policies

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lng-exports  trade  economic-growth  emission-reductions  security 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 21, 2016

With environmentalists attacking a provision in pending energy legislation that would boost the competitiveness of U.S. liquefied natural gas (LNG) exports, now’s a good time to review the reasons to expedite federal approval of LNG export projects in this country.

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oregon  vote4energy  natural-gas  lng-exports  states2016 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 20, 2016

Even in a big hydroelectric power-producing state like Oregon, petroleum-based fuels play an important energy role. Hydro accounted for 55.5 percent of the state’s net electricity generation in 2015 and supplied 34 percent of the energy Oregonians used in 2014 – the largest single energy source. Yet, combined fuels from oil and natural gas supplied 54.5 percent of the energy the state used. By itself, natural gas supplied 23 percent of the energy the state consumed.

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liquefied-natural-gas  lng-exports  trade  us-energy-security  fracking  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted August 2, 2016

Gaining strength is the argument that the United States should move as expeditiously as possible on liquefied natural gas (LNG) export infrastructure that would help secure America’s place in the emerging global LNG market.

The added heft is seen in two ways. First, the initial U.S. shipment of LNG passed through the newly expanded Panama Canal last week, underscoring a point made in this postthat the widened canal will shorten voyage times from U.S. LNG export facilities on the Gulf Coast to Asia and the western coast of South America, boosting the competitiveness of U.S. suppliers. Reduced voyage time means quicker turnaround times, leading to better service and a boost to U.S. competitiveness.

Secondly, an International Energy Agency (IEA) report projects the U.S. will become the world’s third-largest LNG supplier in five years, behind Qatar and Australia. 

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liquefied-natural-gas  lng-exports  infrastructure  economic-benefits  trade 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted July 5, 2016

newly expanded Panama Canal is open for business.

It’s noteworthy, as federal official say, that the enlarged canal can handle the vast majority of the world’s liquefied natural gas (LNG) tankers while significantly shortening travel time and transportation costs for U.S. LNG suppliers to key overseas markets. This is huge for U.S. LNG exports, offering another strong argument for swifter federal approval of pending LNG export projects.

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infrastructure  oil-and-natural-gas  pipelines  policy  lng-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 2, 2016

This wonderful domestic energy abundance and the global LNG market opportunities could be impacted by challenges facing infrastructure expansion here at home. America needs more energy infrastructure to move domestic supply to all areas of the country, for residential consumers, power generators and manufacturers. Yet, without stronger high-level backing, we could see these infrastructure needs delayed or rejected, as occurred last month with the proposed Constitution natural gas pipeline in New York.

Americans overwhelmingly support more energy infrastructure, and there appears to be bipartisan consensus for it in Congress. But infrastructure projects are being targeted by a vocal minority – even though increased domestic use of natural gas is the leading reason the United States is leading the world in reducing carbon emissions. A key going forward is gaining infrastructure support from the White House and the administration, said Marty Durbin, API’s executive director for market development.

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natural-gas-production  infrastructure  lng-exports  climate 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted April 28, 2016

Bringing home recognition of the U.S. energy renaissance and its benefits to policymakers in Washington is critically important. Sustaining and growing the domestic surge in oil and natural gas production depends on forward-looking leadership and sound policies.

No less critical is increasing Americans’ buy-in on the golden opportunity to foster economic growth well into the future, create jobs, produce consumer savings and strengthen U.S. standing in the world, all thanks to more home-grown energy – and all occurring as the United States leads the world in reducing carbon emissions.

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liquefied-natural-gas  lng-exports  energy-department  global-markets  shale-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted March 21, 2016

Interesting weekend remarks from the Energy Department’s deputy secretary on U.S. oil and natural gas exports to Europe – especially so because DOE is the key federal agency in allowing domestic liquefied natural gas (LNG) export projects to proceed.

Energy Deputy Secretary Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall was speaking at a forum hosted by the German Marshall Fund in Brussels, Belgium, when she discussed the dramatic change in energy markets caused by the U.S. shale revolution. Sherwood-Randall:

“What’s really changed in the global energy landscape is American abundance of supply of both oil and gas. … We are now poised to become significant exporters of both oil and natural gas. We began the export of natural gas just last month, and we are also beginning to export oil.”

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lng-exports  natural-gas  jobs  global-markets  economic-security  russia  electricity 

Jack Gerard

Jack Gerard
Posted February 24, 2016

Two separate but related news items last week demonstrate the economic promise and geopolitical significance of America’s natural gas export opportunity

The first headline, “U.S. LNG Set to Hit Global Market,” signifies a landmark moment in America’s trajectory from energy scarcity to abundance. The export facility covered in the article – Cheniere Energy’s Sabine Pass in Cameron Parish, La. – actually opened as a liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in 2008. Just two years later in September 2010, it became the first U.S. facility to apply for a Department of Energy permit to export LNG. After a decade that saw U.S. natural gas production jump 45 percent – and following an extensive review process – Sabine Pass is set to ship its first cargo to Europe.

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