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energy-101  shale  keystone-xl  hydraulic-fracturing  oil34  oil-sands  pipeline  jobs-and-economy  bakken  security-and-access  eagle-ford 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 25, 2013

Wall Street Journal - Texas' Next Big Oil Rush

Refineries in Texas are seeing a much-needed boost as pipelines begin to carry landlocked crude oil from U.S. shale plays to the Gulf Coast. This increase in domestic crude oil is due to increased hydraulic fracturing and shale development across the country. (Subscription publication)

USA TodayReport: Oil Sands  No More Corrosive Than Average Crude

A new report from the National Research Council found “no evidence … that Alberta’s pipeline contents are more corrosive than average crude oil.” 

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economy  hydraulic-fracturing  jobs  jobs-and-economy  keystone-xl  oil34  oil-sands 

Mary Leshper

Mary Schaper
Posted June 20, 2013

Fuel Fix BlogIEA: U.S. Natural Gas Output to Accelerate Next Year

A new estimate from the International Energy Agency says  that 2014-2018 domestic natural gas production will increase thanks to expanded hydraulic fracturing. U.S. shale production increased six-fold to 265 billion cubic meters last year from 45 billion in 2007.

CNBC Underground Economy: How Shale Is ‘Fracking’ the Old Order

CNBC’s top states for business ranking reflects a reordering because of  a U.S. energy surge that “has literally transformed the financial landscape of the central corridor; creating jobs and rising incomes." According to CNBC, this points to the importance of policies that encourage more energy development. "The reality is, California could reap the same shale-oil and shale-gas bounties now benefiting North Dakota. Politicians simply choose not to."

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access  energy  gasoline  regulation  energy-101  jobs-and-economy  gas-prices  fuel-prices  onshore-oil-production  onshore-gas-production 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted May 23, 2013

Gasoline prices have been rising with the approach of the summer driving season – up to about $3.66, according to AAA – pushed there by rising crude oil prices. U.S. consumers need help. And they could get it – if the administration pursued a number of energy policies to put downward pressure on global crude costs, while abandoning other choices that could harm consumers.

API Chief Economist John Felmy’s reporter briefing Thursday focused attention on two paths: one that will increase domestic production of oil and natural gas and one that won’t. Unfortunately, the administration – via proposals to increase energy taxes and a new wave of questionable regulation – looks headed down the wrong path, a recipe for disaster for American energy:

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