The People of America's Oil and Natural Gas Indusry

Energy Tomorrow Blog

keystone-xl-pipeline  canadian-oil-sands  american-energy  economic-security  economic-growth  job-creation  crude-prices  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  oil-and-natural-gas-development 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 14, 2014

The Fix (Washington Post): President Obama is fond of telling Congress that it should pass things with the overwhelming support of the American people, including (among other things) comprehensive immigration reform, increasing the minimum wage, and increasing gun background checks.

And yet, Obama could soon be in a position of vetoing something with a similar amount of support: the Keystone XL pipeline.

Poll after poll has shown support for Keystone is somewhere between very strong and overwhelming. A Pew Research Center survey this month showed support for the project at nearly two-to-one, 59 percent to 31 percent. And that was about the lowest level of support we've seen to date. Support has registered as high as two-thirds of Americans.

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lng-exports  natural-gas-development  economic-growth  job-creation  trade  shale-energy 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 13, 2014

A good deal of the buzz generated by America’s ongoing energy revolution has centered on the way surging domestic production is changing the crude oil imports picture. No question, it’s a pretty one, with net imports as a share of consumption falling to levels not seen in nearly three decades. That’s great news for job creation, the economy, our balance of trade and America’s energy security.

But here’s another pretty picture: declining imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG). Actually, “declining” is too mild a term for what we’re seeing. Thanks to energy developed from shale using hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, the U.S. has become the world’s No. 1 natural gas producer – which has dramatically cut the need to shop the world market for supplies of natural gas, illustrated in plummeting LNG imports.

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keystone-xl-pipeline  president-obama  job-creation  economic-growth  canadian-oil-sands  congress  infrastructure 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 6, 2014

Over the past few years it has been difficult to know President Obama’s true position on the long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline, now under federal review more than six years. That’s likely to change in the new Congress, with Republicans saying Keystone XL legislation will be a top priority soon after the first of the year. North Dakota Sen. John Hoeven talked to Fuel Fix.com:

“The president opposes the project and has tried to defeat it with delay,” Hoeven said, but “given the clear vote from the American public and strong bipartisan support, he may decide it’s time to start working with Congress, and this is a good example of a place to start and why you’ll see us advance the measure early on.”

Given the mid-term election results, President Obama soon will be called to make a decision on Keystone XL – one that will indicate his willingness to work with the new Congress on an issue that has strong public support and one that also will show whether he’s serious about an all-of-the-above approach to energy and American energy security.

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american-energy  election  vote  oil-and-natural-gas-development  access  keystone-xl-pipeline  economic-growth  job-creation 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 5, 2014

As the political parties sort through the results of this week’s mid-term congressional elections, let’s hope neither misses the unmistakable, bipartisan support from the American people for the ongoing energy revolution in this country. In their votes and in data from new election-night public opinion polling, it’s clear Americans see energy policy as a uniting point that can help break Washington gridlock while continuing to revitalize the country’s economy.

These topics and more came up during a conference call API President and CEO Jack Gerard conducted with reporters in the election’s aftermath. According to Gerard, the overarching lesson from Tuesday’s vote: Energy wins. Gerard:

“We need elected leaders who understand what’s at stake and who are willing to set aside outdated assumptions and partisan talking points to work together on safe, responsible and fact-based energy policy. In that regard, we hope that President Obama will take this opportunity to work with the new Congress on smart energy policies that grow our nation’s still shaky economy, create well-paying jobs and maintain our nation’s global energy leadership.”

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american-energy  oil-and-natural-gas-development  economic-growth  job-creation  keystone-xl-pipeline  shale-energy  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted November 4, 2014

Even before Americans went to the polls Tuesday, it’s clear American-made energy is this year’s winner. You could see it in pre-election public opinion surveying showing overwhelming support for increased production of domestic oil and natural gas as a job creator (90 percent), a national priority (87 percent) and as a boon to consumers (79 percent).

Regardless of who wins the most seats in Congress, the nation’s leaders should view policy choices with the knowledge that Americans strongly believe the ongoing U.S. energy revolution is a catalyst for individual prosperity, overall economic growth and national security. API President and CEO Jack Gerard, in a guest post for The Hill:

It may take weeks and a few run-off elections to determine control of Congress. But the American people have already given the House and Senate a clear mandate:  create jobs, boost the economy and advance America’s energy security through commonsense energy policies.

Here’s how we know this is true: As you look across the expanse of America, represented in the different state contests for the U.S. Senate, there’s broad bipartisan support for U.S. energy.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  us-crude-oil-production  hydraulic-fracturing  horizontal-drilling  shale-energy  economic-benefits  job-creation  global-markets 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 16, 2014

Early in a panel discussion of energy policy and politics hosted by Real Clear Politics, the question was asked whether U.S. voters pay much attention to energy issues in an election year. RCP tweeted panelist/Wall Street Journal energy reporter Amy Harder’s response - that voters only notice energy when the prices are high.

Certainly, that’s generally been an accurate analysis. Less than a decade ago energy issues were challenging for U.S. policymakers staring at flat or declining domestic oil and natural gas production

But the U.S. energy picture has been dramatically altered by surging production here at home – an energy revolution made possible by advanced hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling and vast resources in shale and other tight-rock formations. Result: Good news in the absence of challenging energy developments – for U.S. consumers (if not for hosts of events on the intersection of energy and politics).

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crude-oil  energy-exports  economic-benefits  gasoline-prices  job-creation  manufacturing  investments  refineries 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 14, 2014

A new study by the Aspen Institute joins a series of analyses concluding that one benefit from exporting U.S. crude oil would be lower gasoline prices here at home. Aspen’s projected reduction of between 3 and 9 cents per gallon parallels findings in previous major studies by ICF International (3.8 cents per gallon), IHS (8 cents) and Brookings/NERA (7 to 12 cents) that exports would lower pump prices.

Aspen and the other studies project other benefits from exporting crude oil, including broad job creation, economic growth and increased domestic energy production. Yet the solidifying consensus that consumers also would benefit is critically important as the public policy debate on oil exports continues.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  access  energy-investments  job-creation  energy-exports 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted October 3, 2014

Here’s the president, lauding the lift America’s domestic energy revolution has provided the nation’s economy in a speech this week in Illinois:

“The first cornerstone is new investments in the energy and technologies that make America a magnet for good, middle-class jobs. So right off the bat, as soon as I came into office, we upped our investments in American energy to reduce our dependence on foreign oil and strengthen our own energy security.  And today, the number-one oil and gas producer in the world is no longer Russia or Saudi Arabia.  It’s America. For the first time in nearly two decades, we now produce more oil than we buy from other countries.  We’re advancing so fast in this area that two years ago I set a goal to cut our oil imports by half by – in half by 2020, and we’ve actually – we will meet that goal this year, six years ahead of schedule.” 

It’s good to hear the president talking about the benefits to America of resurgent oil and natural gas production here at home. He’s right: The United States is the world’s No. 1 producer of natural gas and is poised to be No. 1 in oil production. He’s also right that this domestic output has cut imports significantly, putting America on a path to zero net imports in the foreseeable future – a good bench mark for something everyone wants: genuine U.S. energy security.

Now let’s talk plainly.

These energy developments and their benefits have occurred without much help from this White House. They’ve happened even as the president’s actions and those of his administration have fallen well short of his “all-of-the-above” rhetoric on energy.

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oil-and-natural-gas-investments  infrastructure  job-creation  economic-growth  access 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 15, 2014

It’s one thing to talk about energizing the U.S. economy, it’s another to walk the talk. America’s oil and natural gas industry is doing that, with four companies ranked in the top 10 of the Progressive Policy Institute’s list of leaders in U.S. capital spending in 2013.

ExxonMobil ($11.07 billion), Chevron ($10.56 billion), ConocoPhillips ($6.35 billion) and Occidental Petroleum ($5.5 billion) ranked in the top 10 in U.S. capital spending – expenditures for plants, property and equipment. Also significant: The same four are in the top 10 of cumulative U.S. capital spending over the three years (2011-2013) PPI has compiled its “investment heroes” list.

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oil-and-natural-gas-development  job-creation  economic-growth  pennsylvania  utah  jack-gerard 

Mark Green

Mark Green
Posted September 5, 2014

Ultimately, America’s energy revolution is what we choose to make of it – through the policy strategies and actions taken by our leaders and governments. Thanks to hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling, the United States is enjoying an energy boom – the harnessing of vast reserves of oil and natural gas that power our economy and enable modern lifestyles. Will that revolution be sustained and expanded? That’s America’s energy choice.

On energy, policy matters. During a speech on the impacts of federal energy policy at this week’s Uintah Basin Energy Summit in Salt Lake City, API President and CEO Jack Gerard said America’s energy renaissance is revitalizing some parts of the country while others are being made to wait for energy benefits because of “backward and shortsighted” policy from Washington.

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